break vs wear what difference

what is difference between break and wear

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: brāk, IPA(key): /bɹeɪk/, [bɹʷeɪ̯k]
  • Rhymes: -eɪk
  • Homophone: brake

Etymology 1

From Middle English breken, from Old English brecan (to break), from Proto-West Germanic *brekan, from Proto-Germanic *brekaną (to break), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰreg- (to break). The word is a doublet of bray.

Verb

break (third-person singular simple present breaks, present participle breaking, simple past broke or (archaic) brake, past participle broken or (colloquial) broke)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To separate into two or more pieces, to fracture or crack, by a process that cannot easily be reversed for reassembly.
    1. (transitive, intransitive) To crack or fracture (bone) under a physical strain.
  2. (transitive) To divide (something, often money) into smaller units.
  3. (transitive) To cause (a person or animal) to lose spirit or will; to crush the spirits of.
    • 1613, William Shakespeare and John Fletcher, Henry VIII, Act IV, Sc. 2:
      An old man, broken with the storms of state,
      Is come to lay his weary bones among ye;
      Give him a little earth for charity
    1. To turn an animal into a beast of burden.
      • 2002, John Fusco, Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron
        Colonel: See, gentlemen? Any horse could be broken.
  4. (intransitive) To be crushed, or overwhelmed with sorrow or grief.
  5. (transitive) To interrupt; to destroy the continuity of; to dissolve or terminate.
    1. (transitive, theater) To end the run of (a play).
      • 1958, Walter Macqueen-Pope, St. James’s: Theatre of Distinction (page 134)
        In July Alexander broke the run and went on tour, as was his custom. He believed in keeping in touch with provincial audiences and how wise he was!
      • 1986, Kurt Gänzl, The British Musical Theatre: 1865-1914 (page 610)
        After Camberwell he broke the play’s season and brought it back in the autumn with a few revisions and a noticeably strengthened cast but without any special success.
  6. (transitive) To ruin financially.
    • With arts like these rich Matho, when he speaks, / Attracts all fees, and little lawyers breaks.
  7. (transitive) To violate, to not adhere to.
  8. (intransitive, of a fever) To pass the most dangerous part of the illness; to go down, in terms of temperature.
    Susan’s fever broke at about 3 AM, and the doctor said the worst was over.
  9. (intransitive, of a spell of settled weather) To end.
  10. (intransitive, of a storm) To begin; to end.
  11. (intransitive, of morning, dawn, day etc.) To arrive.
  12. (transitive, gaming slang) To render (a game) unchallenging by altering its rules or exploiting loopholes or weaknesses in them in a way that gives a player an unfair advantage.
  13. (transitive, intransitive) To stop, or to cause to stop, functioning properly or altogether.
    1. (specifically, in programming) To cause (some feature of a program or piece of software) to stop functioning properly; to cause a regression.
  14. (transitive) To cause (a barrier) to no longer bar.
    1. (specifically) To cause the shell of (an egg) to crack, so that the inside (yolk) is accessible.
    2. (specifically) To open (a safe) without using the correct key, combination, or the like.
  15. (transitive) To destroy the arrangement of; to throw into disorder; to pierce.
  16. (intransitive, of a wave of water) To collapse into surf, after arriving in shallow water.
  17. (intransitive) To burst forth; to make its way; to come into view.
    • 1800, William Wordsworth, The Fountain
      And from the turf a fountain broke, / And gurgled at our feet.
  18. (intransitive) To interrupt or cease one’s work or occupation temporarily.
  19. (transitive) To interrupt (a fall) by inserting something so that the falling object does not (immediately) hit something else beneath.
  20. (transitive, ergative) To disclose or make known an item of news, etc.
  21. (intransitive, of a sound) To become audible suddenly.
    • c. 1843,, George Lippard, The Battle-Day of Germantown, reprinted in Washington and His Generals “1776”, page 45 [2]:
      Like the crash of thunderbolts[…], the sound of musquetry broke over the lawn, […].
  22. (transitive) To change a steady state abruptly.
  23. (copulative, informal) To suddenly become.
  24. (intransitive) Of a male voice, to become deeper at puberty.
  25. (intransitive) Of a voice, to alter in type due to emotion or strain: in men generally to go up, in women sometimes to go down; to crack.
  26. (transitive) To surpass or do better than (a specific number), to do better than (a record), setting a new record.
  27. (sports and games):
    1. (transitive, tennis) To win a game (against one’s opponent) as receiver.
    2. (intransitive, billiards, snooker, pool) To make the first shot; to scatter the balls from the initial neat arrangement.
    3. (transitive, backgammon) To remove one of the two men on (a point).
  28. (transitive, military, most often in the passive tense) To demote, to reduce the military rank of.
    • 1926, T.E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom, New York: Anchor (1991), p. 167:
      Sir Reginald Wingate, High Commissioner in Egypt, was happy for the success of the work he had advocated for years. I grudged him this happiness; for McMahon, who took the actual risk of starting it, had been broken just before prosperity began.
    • 1953 February 9, “Books: First Rulers of Asia”, in Time:
      And he played no favorites: when his son-in-law sacked a city he had been told to spare, Genghis broke him to private.
    • 1968, William Manchester, The Arms of Krupp, Back Bay (2003), →ISBN, page 215:
      One morning after the budget had failed to balance Finanzminister von Scholz picked up Der Reichsanzeiger and found he had been broken to sergeant.
    • 2006, Peter Collier, Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty, Second Edition, Artisan Books, →ISBN, page 42:
      Not long after this event, Clausen became involved in another disciplinary situation and was broken to private—the only one to win the Medal of Honor in Vietnam.
  29. (transitive) To end (a connection), to disconnect.
  30. (intransitive, of an emulsion) To demulsify.
  31. (intransitive, sports) To counter-attack.
  32. (transitive, obsolete) To lay open, as a purpose; to disclose, divulge, or communicate.
  33. (intransitive) To become weakened in constitution or faculties; to lose health or strength.
    • 1731, Jonathan Swift, Verses on His Own Death
      See how the dean begins to break; / Poor gentleman he droops apace.
  34. (intransitive, obsolete) To fail in business; to become bankrupt.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Riches
      He that puts all upon adventures doth oftentimes break, and come to poverty.
  35. (transitive) To destroy the strength, firmness, or consistency of.
  36. (transitive) To destroy the official character and standing of; to cashier; to dismiss.
    • January 11, 1711, Jonathan Swift, The Examiner No. 24
      when I see a great officer broke.
  37. (intransitive) To make an abrupt or sudden change; to change the gait.
  38. (intransitive, archaic) To fall out; to terminate friendship.
    • c. 1700 Jeremy Collier, On Friendship
      To break upon the score of danger or expense is to be mean and narrow-spirited.
  39. (computing) To terminate the execution of a program before normal completion.
  40. (programming) To suspend the execution of a program during debugging so that the state of the program can be investigated.
  41. (computing) To cause, or allow the occurrence of, a line break.
Conjugation
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:break.
Synonyms
  • (ergative: separate into two or more pieces): burst, bust, shatter, shear, smash, split
  • (ergative: crack (bone)): crack, fracture
  • (transitive: turn an animal into a beast of burden): break in, subject, tame
  • (transitive: do that which is forbidden by): contravene, go against, violate
  • (intransitive: stop functioning): break down, bust, fail, go down (of a computer or computer network)
Antonyms
  • (transitive: cause to end up in two or more pieces): assemble, fix, join, mend, put together, repair
  • (tennis, intransitive: break serve): hold
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

break (plural breaks)

  1. An instance of breaking something into two or more pieces.
  2. A physical space that opens up in something or between two things.
  3. A rest or pause, usually from work.
  4. (Britain) a time for students to talk or play.
  5. A short holiday.
  6. A temporary split with a romantic partner.
  7. An interval or intermission between two parts of a performance, for example a theatre show, broadcast, or sports game.
  8. A significant change in circumstance, attitude, perception, or focus of attention.
  9. The beginning (of the morning).
  10. An act of escaping.
  11. (computing) The separation between lines, paragraphs or pages of a written text.
    • 2001, Nan Barber, ‎David Reynolds, Office 2001 for Macintosh: The Missing Manual (page 138)
      No matter how much text you add above the break, the text after the break will always appear at the top of a new page.
  12. (computing) A keystroke or other signal that causes a program to terminate or suspend execution.
  13. (programming) Short for breakpoint.
  14. (Britain, weather) A change, particularly the end of a spell of persistent good or bad weather.
  15. (sports and games):
    1. (tennis) A game won by the receiving player(s).
    2. (billiards, snooker, pool) The first shot in a game of billiards
    3. (snooker) The number of points scored by one player in one visit to the table
    4. (soccer) The counter-attack
    5. (surfing) A place where waves break (that is, where waves pitch or spill forward creating white water).
  16. (dated) A large four-wheeled carriage, having a straight body and calash top, with the driver’s seat in front and the footman’s behind.
  17. (equitation) A sharp bit or snaffle.
    • 1576, George Gascoigne, The Steele Glas
      Pampered jades [] which need nor break nor bit.
  18. (music) A short section of music, often between verses, in which some performers stop while others continue.
  19. (music) The point in the musical scale at which a woodwind instrument is designed to overblow, that is, to move from its lower to its upper register.
  20. (geography, chiefly in the plural) An area along a river that features steep banks, bluffs, or gorges (e.g., Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument, US).
  21. (obsolete, slang) error [late 19th–early 20th c.]
Usage notes
  • music The instruments that are named are the ones that carry on playing, for example a fiddle break implies that the fiddle is the most prominent instrument playing during the break.
Synonyms
  • (instance of breaking something into two pieces): split
  • (physical space that opens up in something or between two things): breach, gap, space; see also Thesaurus:interspace or Thesaurus:hole
  • (rest or pause, usually from work): time-out; see also Thesaurus:pause
  • (time for playing outside): playtime (UK), recess (US)
  • (short holiday): day off, time off; see also Thesaurus:vacation
  • (beginning of the morning): crack of dawn; see also Thesaurus:dawn
  • (error): See Thesaurus:error
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Clipping of breakdown (the percussion break of songs chosen by a DJ for use in hip-hop music) and see also breakdancing.

Noun

break (plural breaks)

  1. (music) A section of extended repetition of the percussion break to a song, created by a hip-hop DJ as rhythmic dance music.
Derived terms
  • Amen break

References

  • break at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • 2001. The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music: North America. Garland Publishing. Ellen Koskoff (Ed.). Pgs. 694-695.

Anagrams

  • Abrek, Baker, Brake, baker, barke, brake

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʁɛk/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English break.

Noun

break m (plural breaks)

  1. break (pause, holiday)
    Synonym: pause
  2. (tennis) break (of serve)

Derived terms

  • balle de break

Etymology 2

From earlier break de chasse, from English shooting brake.

Noun

break m (plural breaks)

  1. (automotive) estate car, station wagon
    Antonym: berline

References

  • “break” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English break.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbrɛk/

Noun

break m (invariable)

  1. break (intermission or brief suspension of activity)

Interjection

break

  1. break! (boxing)

References


Spanish

Noun

break m (plural breaks)

  1. break (pause)
  2. (tennis) break


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English weren, werien, from Old English werian (to clothe, cover over; put on, wear, use; stock (land)), from Proto-West Germanic *waʀjan, from Proto-Germanic *wazjaną (to clothe), from Proto-Indo-European *wes- (to dress, put on (clothes)).

Cognate to Sanskrit वस्ते (váste), Ancient Greek ἕννυμι (hénnumi, put on), Latin vestis (garment) (English vest), Albanian vesh (dress up, wear), Tocharian B wäs-, Old Armenian զգենում (zgenum), Welsh gwisgo, Hittite ????????- (waš-).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /wɛə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) enPR: wâr, IPA(key): /wɛ(ə)ɹ/, [wɛɚ], [wɛɹ]
  • Rhymes: -ɛə(ɹ)
  • Homophones: ware, we’re, where (in accents with the wine-whine merger), were (some dialects)

Verb

wear (third-person singular simple present wears, present participle wearing, simple past wore, past participle worn or (now colloquial and nonstandard) wore)

  1. To carry or have equipped on or about one’s body, as an item of clothing, equipment, decoration, etc.
    • It was April 22, 1831, and a young man was walking down Whitehall in the direction of Parliament Street. He wore shepherd’s plaid trousers and the swallow-tail coat of the day, with a figured muslin cravat wound about his wide-spread collar.
  2. To have or carry on one’s person habitually, consistently; or, to maintain in a particular fashion or manner.
  3. To bear or display in one’s aspect or appearance.
  4. (colloquial, with “it”) To overcome one’s reluctance and endure a (previously specified) situation.
  5. To eat away at, erode, diminish, or consume gradually; to cause a gradual deterioration in; to produce (some change) through attrition, exposure, or constant use.
  6. (intransitive, copulative) To undergo gradual deterioration; become impaired; be reduced or consumed gradually due to any continued process, activity, or use.
    • 1880, Benjamin Disraeli, Endymion
      The family that had raised it wore out in the earlier part of this century
  7. To exhaust, fatigue, expend, or weary.
    His neverending criticism has finally worn my patience.  Toil and care soon wear the spirit.  Our physical advantage allowed us to wear the other team out and win.
  8. (intransitive) To last or remain durable under hard use or over time; to retain usefulness, value, or desirable qualities under any continued strain or long period of time; sometimes said of a person, regarding the quality of being easy or difficult to tolerate.
  9. (intransitive, colloquial) (in the phrase “wearing on (someone)“) To cause annoyance, irritation, fatigue, or weariness near the point of an exhaustion of patience.
  10. (intransitive, of time) To pass slowly, gradually or tediously.
  11. (nautical) To bring (a sailing vessel) onto the other tack by bringing the wind around the stern (as opposed to tacking when the wind is brought around the bow); to come round on another tack by turning away from the wind. Also written “ware”. Past: weared, or wore/worn.
    Synonym: gybe
Derived terms
Related terms
  • vest
Translations
See also
  • don
  • put on

Noun

wear (uncountable)

  1. (uncountable) (in combination) clothing
    footwear; outdoor wear; maternity wear
  2. (uncountable) damage to the appearance and/or strength of an item caused by use over time
    • 1895, H. G. Wells, The Time Machine Chapter X
      Now, I still think that for this box of matches to have escaped the wear of time for immemorial years was a strange, and for me, a most fortunate thing.
  3. (uncountable) fashion
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:wear.
Related terms
  • wear and tear
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English weren, werien, from Old English werian (to guard, keep, defend; ward off, hinder, prevent, forbid; restrain; occupy, inhabit; dam up; discharge obligations on (land)), from Proto-West Germanic *warjan, from Proto-Germanic *warjaną (to defend, protect, ward off), from Proto-Indo-European *wer- (to close, cover, protect, save, defend).

Cognate with Scots wer, weir (to defend, protect), Dutch weren (to aver, ward off), German wehren (to fight), Swedish värja (to defend, ward off), Icelandic verja (to defend).

Alternative forms

  • wer, weir (Scotland)

Verb

wear (third-person singular simple present wears, present participle wearing, simple past weared or wore, past participle weared or worn)

  1. (now chiefly Britain dialectal, transitive) To guard; watch; keep watch, especially from entry or invasion.
  2. (now chiefly Britain dialectal, transitive) To defend; protect.
  3. (now chiefly Britain dialectal, transitive) To ward off; prevent from approaching or entering; drive off; repel.
    to wear the wolf from the sheep
  4. (now chiefly Britain dialectal, transitive) To conduct or guide with care or caution, as into a fold or place of safety.

Etymology 3

Noun

wear (plural wears)

  1. Dated form of weir.

Anagrams

  • -ware, Awre, Ware, arew, ware

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial