breath vs intimation what difference

what is difference between breath and intimation

English

Alternative forms

  • breth (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English breeth, breth, from Old English brǣþ (odor, scent, stink, exhalation, vapor), from Proto-Germanic *brēþaz (vapour, waft, exhalation, breath) of unknown origin, perhaps from *gʰwer- (smell).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: brêth, IPA(key): /bɹɛθ/ [bɹ̠ʷɛθ]
  • Rhymes: -ɛθ

Noun

breath (countable and uncountable, plural breaths)

  1. (uncountable) The act or process of breathing.
    • Breezes blowing from beds of iris quickened her breath with their perfume; she saw the tufted lilacs sway in the wind, and the streamers of mauve-tinted wistaria swinging, all a-glisten with golden bees; she saw a crimson cardinal winging through the foliage, and amorous tanagers flashing like scarlet flames athwart the pines.
  2. (countable) A single act of breathing in or out; a breathing of air.
    • She knew from avalanche safety courses that outstretched hands might puncture the ice surface and alert rescuers. She knew that if victims ended up buried under the snow, cupped hands in front of the face could provide a small pocket of air for the mouth and nose. Without it, the first breaths could create a suffocating ice mask.
  3. (uncountable) Air expelled from the lungs.
  4. (countable) A rest or pause.
  5. A small amount of something, such as wind, or common sense.
  6. (obsolete) Fragrance; exhalation; odor; perfume.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Gardens
      the breath of flowers
  7. (obsolete) Gentle exercise, causing a quicker respiration.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Adjective

breath (not comparable)

  1. (phonetics, of a consonant or vowel) voiceless, surd; contrasting with voice (breath sounds, voice sounds)

Verb

breath (third-person singular simple present breaths, present participle breathing, simple past and past participle breathed)

  1. Misspelling of breathe.
    In the polar regions one finds dark cold waters with few places to breath.

See also

  • exhalation
  • inhalation
  • respiration

Anagrams

  • Bertha, bareth, bather, bertha

Irish

Noun 1

breath f (genitive singular breithe, nominative plural breitheanna)

  1. Alternative form of breith (birth; lay; bearing capacity; bringing, taking; seizing; catching, overtaking)

Noun 2

breath f (genitive singular breithe, nominative plural breitheanna)

  1. Alternative form of breith (judgment, decision; injunction)

Declension

Mutation

References

  • “breath” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.



English

Etymology

From Middle French intimation, from Latin intimatio

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌɪntəˈmeɪʃən/
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

intimation (plural intimations)

  1. The act of intimating.
  2. The thing intimated.
  3. Announcement; declaration.
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)
      They made an edict with an intimation that whosoever killed a stork, should be banished.
  4. A hint; an obscure or indirect suggestion or notice; a remote or ambiguous reference.
    • 1862, Henry David Thoreau, Walking:
      At length, perchance, the immaterial heaven will appear as much higher to the American mind, and the intimations that star it as much brighter.
    • 1975, Saul Bellow, Humboldt’s Gift [Avon ed., 1976, p. 378:
      And actually I had important intimations to communicate as he faced the end. But intimations weren’t much use.

Translations

Related terms

  • intimacy
  • intimate

References

  • “intimation” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial