breathe vs suspire what difference

what is difference between breathe and suspire

English

Etymology

From Middle English brethen (to breathe, blow, exhale, odour), derived from Middle English breth (breath). Eclipsed Middle English ethien and orðiæn, from Old English ēþian and orþian (to breathe); as well as Middle English anden, onden, from Old Norse anda (to breathe). More at breath.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: brēth, IPA(key): /bɹiːð/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /bɹið/
  • Rhymes: -iːð

Verb

breathe (third-person singular simple present breathes, present participle breathing, simple past and past participle breathed)

  1. (intransitive) To draw air into (inhale), and expel air from (exhale), the lungs in order to extract oxygen and excrete waste gases.
  2. (intransitive) To take in needed gases and expel waste gases in a similar way.
  3. (transitive) To inhale (a gas) to sustain life.
  4. (intransitive, figuratively) To live.
    • Breathes there a man with soul so dead?
  5. (transitive) To draw something into the lungs.
  6. (intransitive) To expel air from the lungs, exhale.
  7. (transitive) To exhale or expel (something) in the manner of breath.
    • 2012, Timothy Groves, The Book Of Creatures (→ISBN), page 85:
      Mountain Drakes breathe fire, Ice Drakes breathe ice, Swamp Drakes breathe acid, and Forest Drakes breathe lightning.
  8. (transitive) To give an impression of, to exude.
  9. (transitive) To whisper quietly.
  10. To pass like breath; noiselessly or gently; to emanate; to blow gently.
  11. (chiefly Evangelical and Charismatic Christianity, with God as agent) To inspire (scripture).
    • 1850, John Howard Hinton, On the Divine Inspiration of the Scriptures. A lecture, etc, page 16:
      The affirmation before us, then, will be, “All scripture is divinely breathed.”
    • 1917, J. C. Ferdinand Pittman, Bible Truths Illustrated: For the Use of Preachers, Teachers, Bible-school, Christian Endeavor, Temperance and Other Christian Workers, page 168:
      [] that God, who breathed the Scriptures, “cannot lie,” []
    • 2010, Jay E. Adams, The Christian Counselor’s Manual: The Practice of Nouthetic Counseling, Zondervan (→ISBN)
      Paul says that since God breathed the Scriptures, they are therefore useful; he did not put it the other way around (i.e., that they are useful, therefore inspired).
  12. (intransitive) To exchange gases with the environment.
  13. (intransitive, now rare) To rest; to stop and catch one’s breath.
    • Well! breathe awhile, and then to it again!
  14. (transitive) To stop, to give (a horse) an opportunity to catch its breath.
  15. (transitive) To exercise; to tire by brisk exercise.
  16. (transitive, figuratively) To passionately devote much of one’s life to (an activity, etc.).

Conjugation

Synonyms

  • (to draw air in and out): see Thesaurus:breathe
  • (to be passionate about): live and breathe

Derived terms

Related terms

  • breath

Translations

Anagrams

  • beareth, beheart, herb tea, rebathe


English

Etymology

Late Middle English, from Latin suspīrāre, present active infinitive of suspīrō. Cognate with Old French sospirer (modern soupirer) and Spanish suspirar.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /səˈspaɪə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -aɪə(ɹ)

Verb

suspire (third-person singular simple present suspires, present participle suspiring, simple past and past participle suspired)

  1. (literary) To breathe.
  2. (literary) To exhale.
  3. (literary) To sigh.
    • 1859, Edward Fitzgerald, Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam
      Where the White Hand Of Moses on the Bough/Puts out, and Jesus from the Ground suspires.

Synonyms

  • (to breathe): see Thesaurus:breathe

Related terms

  • suspiral
  • suspiration
  • suspirious

Noun

suspire (plural suspires)

  1. (obsolete) A long, deep breath; a sigh.

Anagrams

  • pussier, rises up, uprises

Portuguese

Verb

suspire

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of suspirar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of suspirar
  3. first-person singular imperative of suspirar
  4. third-person singular imperative of suspirar

Spanish

Verb

suspire

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of suspirar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of suspirar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of suspirar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of suspirar.

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