breed vs cover what difference

what is difference between breed and cover

English

Alternative forms

  • breede (archaic)

Etymology

From Middle English breden, from Old English brēdan, from Proto-Germanic *brōdijaną (to brood), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰreh₁- (warm). Cognate with Scots brede, breid, Saterland Frisian briede, West Frisian briede, Dutch broeden, German Low German bröden, German brüten.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɹiːd/
  • Rhymes: -iːd

Verb

breed (third-person singular simple present breeds, present participle breeding, simple past and past participle bred)

  1. To produce offspring sexually; to bear young.
  2. (transitive) To give birth to; to be the native place of.
    a pond breeds fish; a northern country breeds stout men
  3. Of animals, to mate.
  4. To keep animals and have them reproduce in a way that improves the next generation’s qualities.
  5. To arrange the mating of specific animals.
  6. To propagate or grow plants trying to give them certain qualities.
  7. To take care of in infancy and through childhood; to bring up.
    • 1859, Edward Everett, An Oration on the Occasion of the Dedication of the Statue of Mr. Webster
      born and bred on the verge of the wilderness
  8. To yield or result in.
    • 1634, John Milton, Comus
      Lest the place / And my quaint habits breed astonishment.
  9. (obsolete, intransitive) To be formed in the parent or dam; to be generated, or to grow, like young before birth.
  10. (sometimes as breed up) To educate; to instruct; to bring up
    • 1724-1734′, Bishop Burnet, History of My Own Time
      No care was taken to breed him a Protestant.
    • His farm may not [] remove his children too far from him, or the trade he breeds them up in.
  11. To produce or obtain by any natural process.
    • Children would breed their teeth with much less danger.
  12. (intransitive) To have birth; to be produced, developed or multiplied.
    • 1610-11, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act III Scene 1
      Fair encounter
      Of two most rare affections! Heavens rain grace
      On that which breed between ’em!
  13. (transitive) to ejaculate inside someone’s ass
    • 2018, Cassandra Dee, Paying My Boyfriend’s Debt: A Billionaire Bad Boy Romance, Cassandra Dee Romance via PublishDrive
      “God, I love your ass,” he says, his voice almost a growl. “I’m gonna breed this ass tonight.”
    • 2015, David Holly, The Heart’s Eternal Desire, Bold Strokes Books Inc (→ISBN)
      “ Yes,” I said. “You want to fuck me, and I submit to you. My body is yours. Stuff me. Fill me. Breed my ass. Seed me, my love.
    • year unknown, Tymber Dalton, Disorder in the House [Suncoast Society], Siren-BookStrand (→ISBN), page 32:
      “Then…you get…bred.”
    • 2017, Casper Graham, Same Script, Different Cast [Scripts & Lyrics Trilogy], Siren-BookStrand (→ISBN), page 41:
      “I can’t…can’t last, baby.” / “I don’t care. Come inside me. Breed me.”
    • 2017, Casper Graham, Nothing Short of a Miracle [Scripts & Lyrics Trilogy], Siren-BookStrand (→ISBN), page 19:
      “Are you clean?” he asked. / “Yeah, I get tested recently.” / “Perfect. Breed me.”

Synonyms

  • (take care of in infancy and through childhood): raise, bring up, rear

Derived terms

Related terms

  • breed in the bone

Translations

Noun

breed (plural breeds)

  1. All animals or plants of the same species or subspecies.
    a breed of tulip
    a breed of animal
  2. A race or lineage; offspring or issue.
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Sonnet 12:
      And nothing ‘gainst Time’s scythe can make defence
      Save breed, to brave him when he takes thee hence.
  3. (informal) A group of people with shared characteristics.
    People who were taught classical Greek and Latin at school are a dying breed.

Translations

Anagrams

  • berde, brede, rebed

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch breed, from Middle Dutch brêet, from Old Dutch *brēd, from Proto-West Germanic *braid.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brɪə̯t/, [breət]

Adjective

breed (attributive breë, comparative breër, superlative breedste)

  1. broad

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch brêet, from Old Dutch *brēd, from Proto-West Germanic *braid, from Proto-Germanic *braidaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /breːt/, [breːt]
  • Hyphenation: breed
  • Rhymes: -eːt

Adjective

breed (comparative breder, superlative breedst)

  1. broad, wide
    Antonyms: nauw, smal
  2. large, ample

Inflection

Derived terms

  • breedband
  • breedbeeld
  • breeddoek
  • breedgebouwd
  • breedgerand
  • breedgeschouderd
  • breedgetakt
  • breedgetakt
  • breedheid
  • breedspraak
  • breedte
  • breedvoerig
  • hemelsbreed
  • kamerbreed
  • verbreden

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: breed
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: brete
  • Negerhollands: breed
  • West Frisian: breed

Anagrams

  • brede

Middle English

Etymology 1

Noun

breed

  1. Alternative form of brede (breadth)

Etymology 2

Noun

breed

  1. Alternative form of bred (bread)

West Frisian

Etymology

Borrowed from Dutch breed, displacing older brie.

Adjective

breed

  1. broad, wide

Inflection

Derived terms

  • breedteken

Further reading

  • “breed”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Yola

Etymology

From Middle English bred, from Old English brēad, from Proto-Germanic *braudą. Cognates include English bread and Scots breid.

Noun

breed

  1. bread

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith


English

Etymology

From Middle English coveren, borrowed from Old French covrir, cueuvrir (modern French couvrir), from Late Latin coperire, from Latin cooperiō (I cover completely), from co- (intensive prefix) + operiō (I close, cover). Displaced native Middle English thecchen and bethecchen (to cover) (from Old English þeccan, beþeccan (to cover)), Middle English helen, (over)helen, (for)helen (to cover, conceal) (from Old English helan (to conceal, cover, hide)), Middle English wrien, (be)wreon (to cover) (from Old English (be)wrēon (to cover)), Middle English hodren, hothren (to cover up) (from Low German hudren (to cover up)).

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the original sense of the verb and noun cover was “hide from view” as in its cognate covert. Except in the limited sense of “cover again,” the word recover is unrelated and is cognate with recuperate. Cognate with Spanish cubrir (to cover).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkʌvɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkʌvə/
  • Rhymes: -ʌvə(ɹ)

Noun

cover (countable and uncountable, plural covers)

  1. A lid.
  2. (uncountable) Area or situation which screens a person or thing from view.
  3. The front and back of a book, magazine, CD package, etc.
  4. The top sheet of a bed.
  5. A cloth, usually fitted, placed over an item such as a car or sofa to protect it from dust, rain, etc. when not in use.
  6. A cover charge.
  7. A setting at a restaurant table or formal dinner.
  8. (music) A new performance or rerecording of a previously recorded song; a cover version; a cover song.
  9. (cricket) A fielding position on the off side, between point and mid off, about 30° forward of square; a fielder in this position.
  10. (topology) A set (more often known as a family) of sets, whose union contains the given set.
  11. (philately) An envelope complete with stamps and postmarks etc.
  12. (military) A solid object, including terrain, that provides protection from enemy fire.
  13. (law) In commercial law, a buyer’s purchase on the open market of goods similar or identical to the goods contracted for after a seller has breached a contract of sale by failure to deliver the goods contracted for.
  14. (insurance) An insurance contract; coverage by an insurance contract.
  15. (espionage) A persona maintained by a spy or undercover operative; cover story.
  16. (dated) A swindler’s confederate.
  17. The portion of a slate, tile, or shingle that is hidden by the overlap of the course above.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  18. In a steam engine, the lap of a slide valve.
  19. (construction) The distance between reinforcing steel and the exterior of concrete.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Hijazi Arabic: كَڤَر(kavar)

Translations

Adjective

cover (not comparable)

  1. Of or pertaining to the front cover of a book or magazine.
  2. (music) Of, pertaining to, or consisting of cover versions.

Translations

Verb

cover (third-person singular simple present covers, present participle covering, simple past and past participle covered)

  1. (transitive) To place something over or upon, as to conceal or protect.
  2. (transitive) To be over or upon, as to conceal or protect.
    • A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor; as, again, the arm-chair in which Bunting now sat forward, staring into the dull, small fire.
  3. (transitive) To be upon all of, so as to completely conceal.
  4. (transitive) To set upon all of, so as to completely conceal.
  5. (intransitive, dated) To put on one’s hat.
  6. (transitive) To invest (oneself with something); to bring upon (oneself).
    • 1842, Henry Brougham, Political Philosophy
      the powers that covered themselves with everlasting infamy by the partition of Poland
  7. (of a publication) To discuss thoroughly; to provide coverage of.
  8. To deal with or include someone or something.
    • 2010 (publication date), “Contributors”, Discover, ISSN 0274-7529, volume 32, number 1, January–February 2011, page 7:
      Richard Morgan covers science for The Economist, The New York Times, Scientific American, and Wired.
  9. To be enough money for.
  10. (intransitive) To act as a replacement.
  11. (transitive) To have as an assignment or responsibility.
  12. (music) To make a cover version of (a song that was originally recorded by another artist).
  13. (military, law enforcement) To protect using an aimed firearm and the threat of firing; or to protect using continuous, heaving fire at or in the direction of the enemy so as to force the enemy to remain in cover; or to threaten using an aimed firearm.
  14. To provide insurance coverage for.
  15. To copulate with (said of certain male animals such as dogs and horses).
    Synonym: impregnate
  16. (chess, transitive) To protect or control (a piece or square).
  17. To extend over a given period of time or range, to occupy, to stretch over a given area.
  18. To traverse or put behind a certain distance.
    • 1915, Aerial Age
      November 22 — Owing to bad weather all machines flew at a height of 5,000 feet and covered the 90 miles in just 90 minutes . November 23 — During fourth lap …
    • 1989, Robert K. Krick, Parker’s Virginia Battery, C.S.A.
      It had covered better than 840 miles in just a few hours more than seven days.32 The apparently clumsily managed shuffle through the various railroad nets …
  19. (sports) To defend a particular player or area.

Quotations

  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:cover.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • German: covern
  • Danish: lave en cover

Translations

Anagrams

  • Vorce, corve

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English cover.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɑ.vər/, /ˈkɔ.vər/
  • Hyphenation: co‧ver

Noun

cover m (plural covers, diminutive covertje n)

  1. A cover, cover song, cover version (rerecording of a previously recorded song, typically by a different artist).
  2. A cover, the front of a magazine or of the package of a storage medium.

Derived terms

  • coveren
  • coverversie

Finnish

Etymology

From English cover.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkoʋer/, [ˈko̞ʋe̞r]

Noun

cover

  1. cover, cover version, cover song (rerecording of a previously recorded song)

Declension

Synonyms

  • koveri, coverversio

French

Etymology

From English cover.

Noun

cover m (plural covers)

  1. (colloquial) cover (rerecording)

German

Verb

cover

  1. inflection of covern:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. singular imperative

Polish

Etymology

From English cover.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): //ˈkɔ.vɛr//, //ˈka.vɛr//

Noun

cover m inan

  1. (music) cover version (rerecording of a song)

Declension

Further reading

  • cover in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • cover in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

From English cover.

Noun

cover m or f (rare) (plural coveres)

  1. (music) cover version (rerecording of a song by another musician or group)
    Synonym: versão cover

Spanish

Etymology

From English cover.

Noun

cover m (plural covers)

  1. cover, cover version

Swedish

Etymology

From English cover.

Noun

cover c

  1. (music) cover, cover song

Usage notes

The plural of this word could also be covers.

Declension

Derived terms

  • coverband

References

  • cover in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

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