brew vs brewage what difference

what is difference between brew and brewage

English

Etymology 1

Middle English brewen, from Old English brēowan, from Proto-West Germanic *breuwan, from Proto-Germanic *brewwaną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrewh₁-.

Cognate with
Dutch brouwen, German brauen, Swedish brygga, Norwegian Bokmål brygge; also Ancient Greek φρέαρ (phréar, well), Latin fervēre (to be hot; to burn; to boil), Old Irish bruth (violent, boiling heat), Sanskrit भुर्वन् (bhurván, motion of water). It may be related to English barley

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bro͞o, IPA(key): /bɹuː/
    • (Wales) IPA(key): /bɹɪʊ̯/
  • Rhymes: -uː

Verb

brew (third-person singular simple present brews, present participle brewing, simple past and past participle brewed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To make tea or coffee by mixing tea leaves or coffee beans with hot water.
    • 1935, Christopher Isherwood, Mr Norris Changes Trains, Penguin, 1942, Chapter Eleven, p. 113,[1]
      Elderly people sat indoors, in the damp. shabby houses, brewing malt coffee or weak tea and talking without animation []
  2. (transitive) To heat wine, infusing it with spices; to mull.
    • c. 1600, William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act III, Scene 5,[2]
      Go, brew me a pottle of sack finely.
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To make a hot soup by combining ingredients and boiling them in water.
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To make beer by steeping a starch source in water and fermenting the resulting sweet liquid with yeast.
  5. (transitive) To foment or prepare, as by brewing
    Synonyms: contrive, plot, hatch
    • 1634, John Milton, Comus, in Poems of Mr. John Milton, London: Humphrey Mosely, 1645, p. 106,[3]
      Hence with thy brew’d inchantments, foul deceiver []
  6. (intransitive) To attend to the business, or go through the processes, of brewing or making beer.
    • c. 1600, William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act I, Scene 4,[4]
      I wash, wring, brew, bake, scour, dress meat and drink []
  7. (intransitive, of an unwelcome event) To be in a state of preparation; to be mixing, forming, or gathering.
    • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II, Scene 5,[5]
      There is some ill a-brewing towards my rest,
  8. (transitive, obsolete) To boil or seethe; to cook.
Translations
Derived terms
  • brewage
  • brewer
  • brewery
  • brewhouse

Noun

brew (plural brews)

  1. The mixture formed by brewing; that which is brewed; a brewage, such as tea or beer.
    1. (slang) A single serving (can, bottle, etc.) of beer.
    2. (Britain, slang) A cup of tea.
Translations

Etymology 2

Middle English brewe (eyebrow), from Old English bru (eyebrow). Doublet of brow

Noun

brew (plural brews)

  1. (Britain, dialect) An overhanging hill or cliff.
Translations

Anagrams

  • BWER

Middle English

Verb

brew

  1. Alternative form of brewen

Polish

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *bry, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃bʰrúHs

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brɛf/

Noun

brew f

  1. eyebrow

Declension

Further reading

  • brew in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • brew in Polish dictionaries at PWN


English

Etymology

brew +‎ -age

Noun

brewage (countable and uncountable, plural brewages)

  1. Something brewed.
    • 1855, Robert Browning, “Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came”, XXIII:
      [] Mad brewage set to work / Their brains, no doubt, like galley-slaves the Turk / Pits for his pastime, Christians against Jews.

Anagrams

  • begware

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial