bribe vs corrupt what difference

what is difference between bribe and corrupt

English

Etymology

From Old French briber (go begging).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: brīb, IPA(key): /bɹaɪb/
  • Rhymes: -aɪb

Noun

bribe (plural bribes)

  1. Something (usually money) given in exchange for influence or as an inducement to dishonesty.
    • c. 1613-1625, Henry Hobart, Yardly v. Ellill
      Undue reward for anything against justice is a bribe.
  2. That which seduces; seduction; allurement.
    • 1744, Mark Akenside, The Pleasures of the Imagination
      Not the bribes of sordid wealth can seduce to leave these everblooming sweets.
    • 1974, George Fox, Mario Puzo, Earthquake
      Remy, this was a bribe! Our whole marriage has been nothing but a series of bribes!

Synonyms

  • See Thesaurus:bribe

Derived terms

  • bribeless
  • bribeproof
  • bribetaking

Translations

Verb

bribe (third-person singular simple present bribes, present participle bribing, simple past and past participle bribed)

  1. (transitive) To give a bribe to; specifically, to ask a person to do something, usually against his/her will, in exchange for some type of reward or relief from potential trouble.
    • October 23, 1848, Frederick William Robertson, an address delivered at the Opening of The Working Men’s Institute
      Neither is he worthy who bribes a man to vote against his conscience.
  2. (transitive) To gain by a bribe; to induce as by a bribe.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • ribbe

French

Etymology

Imitative. (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʁib/
  • Rhymes: -ib

Noun

bribe f (plural bribes)

  1. (obsolete) crumb (of bread)
  2. scrap, bit

Further reading

  • “bribe” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Alternative forms

  • corrumpt (archaic)
  • corrump (obsolete)
  • corroupt (rare)

Etymology

From Middle English corrupten, derived from Latin corruptus, past participle of corrumpō, corrumpere (to destroy, ruin, injure, spoil, corrupt, bribe), from com- (together) + rumpere (to break in pieces).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kəˈɹʌpt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌpt

Adjective

corrupt (comparative more corrupt, superlative most corrupt)

  1. In a depraved state; debased; perverted; morally degenerate; weak in morals.
    The government here is corrupt, so we’ll emigrate to escape them.
    • The earth also was corrupt before God, and the earth was filled with violence.
    • At what ease
      Might corrupt minds procure knaves as corrupt
      To swear against you.
  2. Abounding in errors; not genuine or correct; in an invalid state.
    The text of the manuscript is corrupt.
    It turned out that the program was corrupt – that’s why it wouldn’t open.
  3. In a putrid state; spoiled; tainted; vitiated; unsound.
    • with such corrupt and pestilent bread to feed them.

Usage notes

  • Nouns to which “corrupt” is often applied: practice, state, country, nation, regime, city, government, person, man, politician, leader, mayor, judge, member, minister, file, database, document, woman.

Synonyms

  • corrupted

Translations

Verb

corrupt (third-person singular simple present corrupts, present participle corrupting, simple past and past participle corrupted)

  1. (transitive) To make corrupt; to change from good to bad; to draw away from the right path; to deprave; to pervert.
    • And God looked upon the earth, and, behold, it was corrupt; for all flesh had corrupted his way upon the earth.
  2. (archaic, intransitive) To become putrid, tainted, or otherwise impure; to putrefy; to rot.
    • he entrails, which are the parts aptest to corrupt
  3. (transitive) To introduce errors; to place into an invalid state.
  4. To debase or make impure by alterations or additions; to falsify.
  5. To waste, spoil, or consume; to make worthless.
    • Lay not up for yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth and rust doth corrupt.

Translations

Related terms

  • corruptible
  • corruption
  • incorruptible

References

  • corrupt in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • corrupt in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin corruptus or from Middle French corrupt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔˈrʏpt/
  • Hyphenation: cor‧rupt
  • Rhymes: -ʏpt

Adjective

corrupt (comparative corrupter, superlative corruptst)

  1. corrupt (lacking integrity, being prone to discriminating, open to bribes, etc.)
  2. (textual criticism) corrupt (containing (many) errors)
  3. deprave, morally corrupt

Inflection

Related terms

  • corrumperen
  • corruptie

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: korrup
  • Indonesian: korup
  • West Frisian: korrupt

Middle French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin corruptus.

Adjective

corrupt m (feminine singular corrupte, masculine plural corrupts, feminine plural corruptes)

  1. corrupt (impure; not in its original form)

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