bridge vs nosepiece what difference

what is difference between bridge and nosepiece

English

Alternative forms

  • bridg (obsolete)
  • brigge (etymology 1, noun)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: brĭj, IPA(key): /bɹɪd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪdʒ

Etymology 1

From Middle English brigge, from Old English brycġ (bridge), from Proto-Germanic *brugjō, *brugjǭ (bridge), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerw-, *bʰrēw- (wooden flooring, decking, bridge).

Cognate with Scots brig, brigg, breeg (bridge), Saterland Frisian Brääch (bridge), West Frisian brêge (bridge), Dutch brug (bridge), German Brücke (bridge), Danish bro (bridge) and brygge (wharf), Icelandic brú (bridge) and brygga (pier), Gaulish briua (bridge), Serbo-Croatian brv (bridge, crossbar), Old Church Slavonic бръвъно (brŭvŭno, beam) and Russian бревно́ (brevnó, log).

The verb is from Middle English briggen, from Old English brycġian (to bridge, make a causeway, pave), derived from the noun. Cognate with Dutch bruggen (to bridge), Middle Low German bruggen (to bridge), Old High German bruccōn (to bridge) (whence Modern German brücken).

Noun

bridge (plural bridges)

  1. A construction or natural feature that spans a divide.
    1. A construction spanning a waterway, ravine, or valley from an elevated height, allowing for the passage of vehicles, pedestrians, trains, etc.
    2. (anatomy) The upper bony ridge of the human nose.
    3. (dentistry) A prosthesis replacing one or several adjacent teeth.
    4. (bowling) The gap between the holes on a bowling ball
  2. An arch or superstructure.
    1. (nautical) An elevated platform above the upper deck of a mechanically propelled ship from which it is navigated and from which all activities on deck can be seen and controlled by the captain, etc; smaller ships have a wheelhouse, and sailing ships were controlled from a quarterdeck.
    2. (music, lutherie) The piece, on string instruments, that supports the strings from the sounding board.
    3. (billiards, snooker, pool) A particular form of one hand placed on the table to support the cue when making a shot in cue sports.
    4. (billiards, snooker, pool) A cue modified with a convex arch-shaped notched head attached to the narrow end, used to support a player’s (shooter’s) cue for extended or tedious shots. Also called a spider.
    5. Anything supported at the ends and serving to keep some other thing from resting upon the object spanned, as in engraving, watchmaking, etc., or which forms a platform or staging over which something passes or is conveyed.
    6. (wrestling) A defensive position in which the wrestler is supported by his feet and head, belly-up, in order to prevent touch-down of the shoulders and eventually to dislodge an opponent who has established a position on top.
    7. (gymnastics) A similar position in gymnastics.
  3. A connection, real or abstract.
    1. (medicine) A rudimentary procedure before definite solution
    2. (computing) A device which connects two or more computer buses, typically in a transparent manner.
    3. (programming) A software component connecting two or more separate systems.
      • 2011, Thord Daniel Hedengren, Smashing WordPress Themes: Making WordPress Beautiful
        The plugin also acts as a bridge with BuddyPress and adds things like the top admin bar, and so on.
    4. (networking) A system which connects two or more local area networks at layer 2 of OSI model.
    5. (chemistry) An intramolecular valence bond, atom or chain of atoms that connects two different parts of a molecule; the atoms so connected being bridgeheads.
    6. (electronics) An unintended solder connection between two or more components or pins.
    7. (music) A contrasting section within a song that prepares for the return of the original material section.
    8. (graph theory) An edge which, if removed, changes a connected graph to one that is not connected.
    9. (poetry) A point in a line where a break in a word unit cannot occur.
    10. (diplomacy) A statement, such as an offer, that signals a possibility of accord.
    11. A day falling between two public holidays and consequently designated as an additional holiday.
  4. (electronics) Any of several electrical devices that measure characteristics such as impedance and inductance by balancing different parts of a circuit
  5. A low wall or vertical partition in the fire chamber of a furnace, for deflecting flame, etc.; a bridge wall.
  6. (cycling) The situation where a lone rider or small group of riders closes the space between them and the rider or group in front.
  7. A solid crust of undissolved salt in a water softener.
  8. (roller derby) An elongated chain of teammates, connected to the pack, for improved blocking potential.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

bridge (third-person singular simple present bridges, present participle bridging, simple past and past participle bridged)

  1. To be or make a bridge over something.
    With enough cable, we can bridge this gorge.
  2. To span as if with a bridge.
    • 2012, Christoper Zara, Tortured Artists: From Picasso and Monroe to Warhol and Winehouse, the Twisted Secrets of the World’s Most Creative Minds, part 1, chapter 1, 28:
      The brooding, black-clad singer bridged a stark divide that emerged in the recording industry in the 1950s, as post-Elvis pop singers diverged into two camps and audiences aligned themselves with either the sideburned rebels of rock ‘n’ roll or the cowboy-hatted twangsters of country music.
    The two groups were able to bridge their differences.
  3. (music) To transition from one piece or section of music to another without stopping.
    We need to bridge that jam into “The Eleven”.
  4. (computing, communication) To connect two or more computer buses, networks etc. with a bridge.
  5. (wrestling) To go to the bridge position.
  6. (roller derby) To employ the bridge tactic. (See Noun section.)
Translations

Etymology 2

From the earlier form (name of an older card game) biritch, probably from Russian бири́ч (biríč) (per the OED), or else from Turkish birüç, “one-three”.

Noun

bridge (uncountable)

  1. (card games) A card game played with four players playing as two teams of two players each.
    Bidding is an essential element of the game of bridge.
Translations

References

Anagrams

  • BIRGed, begird

Basque

Etymology

Borrowed from English bridge.

Noun

bridge ?

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from English bridge.

Noun

bridge m (plural bridges)

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Danish

Etymology

From English bridge.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /britsj/, [ˈb̥ʁid̥ɕ]

Noun

bridge c (singular definite bridgen, not used in plural form)

  1. bridge (a card game)

Inflection


Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English bridge.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brɪdʒ/ (/r/ may be realised as [ɹ])
  • Hyphenation: bridge

Noun

bridge n (uncountable)

  1. bridge (card game)

Derived terms

  • bridgeclub
  • bridgen

Related terms

  • brug

Faroese

Etymology

From English bridge.

Noun

bridge ?

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Finnish

Etymology

From English bridge.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbridɡe/, [ˈbridɡe̞]
  • Rhymes: -idɡe
  • Syllabification: brid‧ge

Noun

bridge

  1. (card games) bridge

Declension

Compounds

  • sitoumusbridge

French

Etymology

From English bridge.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʁidʒ/

Noun

bridge m (uncountable)

  1. (card games) bridge
  2. (dentistry, France) bridge

Synonyms

  • (dentistry): pont (Canada)

Further reading

  • “bridge” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Indonesian

Etymology

Borrowed from English bridge.

Noun

bridge (first-person possessive bridgeku, second-person possessive bridgemu, third-person possessive bridgenya)

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English bridge.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbrid͡ʒ/

Noun

bridge m (invariable)

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Derived terms

References


Limburgish

Etymology

Borrowed from English bridge.

Noun

bridge ?

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From English bridge

Noun

bridge m (definite singular bridgen, uncountable)

  1. bridge (card game)

References

  • “bridge” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English bridge.

Noun

bridge m (definite singular bridgen, uncountable)

  1. (card games) bridge

References

  • “bridge” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Etymology

From English bridge

Noun

bridge m (uncountable)

  1. (card games) bridge

Romanian

Etymology

From English bridge.

Noun

bridge n (plural bridge-uri)

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)
  2. a game of bridge

Declension


Saterland Frisian

Etymology

Borrowed from English bridge.

Noun

bridge

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Sicilian

Etymology

Borrowed from English bridge.

Noun

bridge ?

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English bridge.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɾit͡ʃ/, [ˈbɾit͡ʃ]

Noun

bridge m (uncountable)

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Swedish

Etymology

From English.

Noun

bridge c

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Declension

Derived terms


Welsh

Etymology

Borrowed from English bridge.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brɪd͡ʒ/

Noun

bridge m

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)


English

Etymology

nose +‎ piece

Noun

nosepiece (plural nosepieces)

  1. Anything (originally a piece of armour) that protects the nose.
  2. An animal’s noseband.
  3. The bridge between spectacle lenses that rests on the nose.
  4. The part of a microscope that holds the objectives.
  5. The outer end or point of a pipe, bellows, etc.

Anagrams

  • epicœnes, one-pieces

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