Brief vs Debrief what difference

what is difference between Brief and Debrief

English

Etymology

From Middle English breef, breve, bref, from Old French brief, bref, from Latin brevis (short), from Proto-Indo-European *mréǵʰus (short, brief). Doublet of merry.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: brēf, IPA(key): /bɹiːf/
  • Rhymes: -iːf

Adjective

brief (comparative briefer, superlative briefest)

  1. Of short duration; happening quickly. [from 15th c.]
  2. Concise; taking few words. [from 15th c.]
  3. Occupying a small distance, area or spatial extent; short. [from 17th c.]
    • 1983, Robert Drewe, The Bodysurfers, Penguin 2009, p. 17:
      On the beach he always wore a straw hat with a red band and a brief pair of leopard print trunks.
  4. (obsolete) Rife; common; prevalent.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:ephemeral
  • See also Thesaurus:concise

Derived terms

  • briefen
  • briefly

Related terms

  • brevity

Translations

Noun

brief (plural briefs)

  1. (law) A writ summoning one to answer; an official letter or mandate.
  2. (law) An answer to any action.
    • 1996, Japanese Rules of Civil Procedure[4], Article 79, Section 1:
      A written answer or any other brief shall be submitted to the court while allowing a period necessary for the opponent to make preparations with regard to the matters stated therein.
  3. (law) A memorandum of points of fact or of law for use in conducting a case.
  4. (by extension, figuratively) A position of interest or advocacy.
  5. (law) An attorney’s legal argument in written form for submission to a court.
  6. (English law) The material relevant to a case, delivered by a solicitor to the barrister who tries the case.
  7. A short news story or report.
  8. (usually in the plural) underwear briefs.
  9. (obsolete) A summary, précis or epitome; an abridgement or abstract.
    • 1589, Thomas Nashe, The Anatomie of Absurditie[5]:
      [] euen ſo it fareth with mee, who béeing about to anatomize Abſurditie, am vrged to take a view of ſundry mens vanitie, a ſuruey of their follie, a briefe of their barbariſme []
  10. (Britain, historical) A letter patent, from proper authority, authorizing a collection or charitable contribution of money in churches, for any public or private purpose.
  11. (slang) A ticket of any type.

Derived terms

  • briefs
  • control brief

Translations

References

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989) , “brief”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN

Verb

brief (third-person singular simple present briefs, present participle briefing, simple past and past participle briefed)

  1. (transitive) To summarize a recent development to some person with decision-making power.
  2. (transitive, law) To write a legal argument and submit it to a court.

Derived terms

  • debrief

Translations

Adverb

brief (comparative more brief, superlative most brief)

  1. (obsolete, poetic) Briefly.
  2. (obsolete, poetic) Soon; quickly.

Related terms

  • briefing
  • brevity

References

Further reading

  • brief in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • brief in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • brief at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • FBIer, fiber, fibre


Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch brief, from Middle Dutch brief, from Old Dutch [Term?], from Latin brevis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brif/

Noun

brief (plural briewe)

  1. letter (written message)

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch brief, from Old Dutch [Term?], borrowed from Latin brevis (short).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brif/
  • Hyphenation: brief
  • Rhymes: -if

Noun

brief m (plural brieven, diminutive briefje n)

  1. letter (written message)

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: brief
  • Sranan Tongo: brifi

References


Middle French

Etymology

From Old French brief.

Adjective

brief m (feminine singular briefve, masculine plural briefs, feminine plural briefves)

  1. brief; short

Descendants

  • French: bref

Old French

Alternative forms

  • bref

Etymology

From Latin brevis.

Adjective

brief m (oblique and nominative feminine singular brieve)

  1. brief, short in length

Declension

Derived terms

  • briement

Noun

brief m (oblique plural briés, nominative singular briés, nominative plural brief)

  1. (short) letter or statement

Descendants

  • Middle French: brief
    • French: bref
  • Middle English: bref, breef, breve, brefe, breefe
    • English: brief, breve
    • Scots: brief, brieve, breef, briefe


English

Etymology

de- +‎ brief.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /diːˈbɹiːf/
  • Rhymes: -iːf

Verb

debrief (third-person singular simple present debriefs, present participle debriefing, simple past and past participle debriefed)

  1. (transitive) To question someone after a military mission in order to obtain intelligence.
  2. (transitive) To question someone, or a group of people, after the implementation of a project in order to learn from mistakes etc.
  3. (transitive) To inform subjects of an experiment about what has happened in a complete and accurate manner.

Derived terms

  • debriefing (noun)

Translations

Anagrams

  • briefed, defiber, defibre, fibered, firebed

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