bring vs fetch what difference

what is difference between bring and fetch

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɹɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋ

Etymology 1

From Middle English bryngen, from Old English bringan (to bring, lead, bring forth, carry, adduce, produce, present, offer), from Proto-Germanic *bringaną (to bring) (compare West Frisian bringe, Low German bringen, Dutch brengen, German bringen), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrenk- (compare Welsh hebrwng (to bring, lead), Tocharian B pränk- (to take away; restrain oneself, hold back), Latvian brankti (lying close), Lithuanian branktas (whiffletree)).

Verb

bring (third-person singular simple present brings, present participle bringing, simple past and past participle brought)

  1. (transitive, ditransitive) To transport toward somebody/somewhere.
    • At twilight in the summer [] the mice come out. They [] eat the luncheon crumbs. Mr. Checkly, for instance, always brought his dinner in a paper parcel in his coat-tail pocket, and ate it when so disposed, sprinkling crumbs lavishly [] on the floor.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To supply or contribute.
  3. (transitive) To occasion or bring about.
    The controversial TV broadcast brought a storm of complaints.
  4. (transitive) To raise (a lawsuit, charges, etc.) against somebody.
  5. To persuade; to induce; to draw; to lead; to guide.
  6. To produce in exchange; to sell for; to fetch.
  7. (baseball) To pitch, often referring to a particularly hard thrown fastball.
Conjugation
Usage notes
  • Past brang and past participle brung and broughten forms are sometimes used in some dialects, especially in informal speech.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Onomatopeia.

Interjection

bring

  1. The sound of a telephone ringing.

Afrikaans

Alternative forms

  • breng (archaic)

Etymology

From Dutch bringen, a dialectal variant of standard brengen (to bring). Both forms were originally distinct, though related, verbs, but were early on conflated.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brəŋ/

Verb

bring (present bring, present participle bringende, past participle gebring)

  1. (transitive) to bring; to deliver
  2. (transitive) to take; to lead (to another place)
    Bring asseblief hierdie borde kombuis toe.

    Please, take these dishes to the kitchen.

Derived terms

  • uitbring
  • wegbring

Danish

Verb

bring

  1. imperative of bringe

Garo

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

bring

  1. jungle, forest

German

Pronunciation

Verb

bring

  1. imperative singular of bringen

Middle English

Verb

bring

  1. Alternative form of bryngen

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian bringa, which derives from Proto-Germanic *bringaną. Cognates include West Frisian bringe.

Verb

bring

  1. (Föhr-Amrum), (Heligoland) to bring

Conjugation


Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

bring

  1. imperative of bringe

Scots

Etymology

From Middle English bryngen, from Old English bringan.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brɪŋ/

Verb

bring (third-person singular present brings, present participle bringin, past brocht, past participle brocht)

  1. To bring.


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: fĕch, IPA(key): /fɛtʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛtʃ

Etymology 1

The verb is derived from Middle English fecchen (to get and bring back, fetch; to come for, get and take away; to steal; to carry away to kill; to search for; to obtain, procure)  [and other forms], from Old English feċċan, fæċċan, feccean (to fetch, bring; to draw; to gain, take; to seek), a variant of fetian, fatian (to bring near, fetch; to acquire, obtain; to bring on, induce; to fetch a wife, marry) and possibly related to Old English facian, fācian (to acquire, obtain; to try to obtain; to get; to get to, reach), both from Proto-Germanic *fatōną, *fatjaną (to hold, seize; to fetch), from Proto-Indo-European *ped- (to step, walk; to fall, stumble). The English word is cognate with Dutch vatten (to apprehend, catch; to grasp; to understand), English fet ((obsolete) to fetch), Faroese fata (to grasp, understand), Swedish fatta (to grasp, understand), German fassen (to catch, grasp; to capture, seize), Icelandic feta (to go, step), West Frisian fetsje (to grasp).

The noun is derived from the verb.

Verb

fetch (third-person singular simple present fetches, present participle fetching, simple past and past participle fetched)

  1. To retrieve; to bear towards; to go and get.
    • 1611 King James Bible, 1 Kings xvii. 11, 12
      He called to her, and said, Fetch me, I pray thee, a little water in a vessel, that I may drink.
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows
      When they got home, the Rat made a bright fire in the parlour, and planted the Mole in an arm-chair in front of it, having fetched down a dressing-gown and slippers for him, and told him river stories till supper-time.
  2. To obtain as price or equivalent; to sell for.
  3. (nautical) To bring or get within reach by going; to reach; to arrive at; to attain; to reach by sailing.
  4. (intransitive) To bring oneself; to make headway; to veer; as, to fetch about; to fetch to windward.
  5. (rare, literary) To take (a breath), to heave (a sigh)
  6. To cause to come; to bring to a particular state.
    • 1879, William Barnes, A Witch
      They couldn’t fetch the butter in the churn.
  7. (obsolete) To recall from a swoon; to revive; sometimes with to.
  8. To reduce; to throw.
    • 1692, Robert South, sermon 28
      The sudden trip in wrestling that fetches a man to the ground.
  9. (archaic) To accomplish; to achieve; to perform, with certain objects or actions.
    • 1631, Ben Jonsons, Chloridia
      Ixion [] turn’d dancer, does nothing but cut capreols, fetch friskals, and leads lavaltoes
    • 1692, Robert South, sermon 28
      He fetches his blow quick and sure.
  10. (nautical, transitive) To make (a pump) draw water by pouring water into the top and working the handle.

Conjugation

Alternative forms

  • fatch, fotch (dialectal)

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

fetch (plural fetches)

  1. (also figuratively) An act of fetching, of bringing something from a distance.
    1. (computing, specifically) An act of fetching data.
  2. The object of fetching; the source of an attraction; a force, propensity, or quality which attracts.
  3. A stratagem or trick; an artifice.
    Synonyms: contrivance, dodge
    • 1665, Robert South, “Jesus of Nazareth proved the true and only promised Messiah”, in Twelve Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions, Volume 3, 6th Edition, 1727:
      Every little fetch of wit and criticism.
    • 1748, Samuel Richardson, Clarissa, Letter 29:
      And as to your cant of living single, nobody will believe you. This is one of your fetches to avoid complying with your duty […].

Interjection

fetch

  1. (Utah) Minced oath for fuck
References
  • 20 Things Only Utahns Will Understand And Appreciate

Etymology 2

Origin uncertain; the following possibilities have been suggested:

  • From fetch-life ((obsolete, rare) a deity, spirit, etc., who guides the soul of a dead person to the afterlife; a psychopomp).
  • From the supposed Old English *fæcce (evil spirit formerly thought to sit on the chest of a sleeping person; a mare).
  • From Old Irish fáith (seer, soothsayer).

Noun

fetch (plural fetches)

  1. (originally Ireland, dialectal) The apparition of a living person; a person’s double, the sight of which is supposedly a sign that they are fated to die soon, a doppelganger; a wraith (a person’s likeness seen just after their death; a ghost, a spectre). [from 18th c.]

Derived terms

  • fetch candle

Translations

References

Further reading

  • fetch (folklore) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • fetch (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Fecht

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