bring vs institute what difference

what is difference between bring and institute

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɹɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋ

Etymology 1

From Middle English bryngen, from Old English bringan (to bring, lead, bring forth, carry, adduce, produce, present, offer), from Proto-Germanic *bringaną (to bring) (compare West Frisian bringe, Low German bringen, Dutch brengen, German bringen), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrenk- (compare Welsh hebrwng (to bring, lead), Tocharian B pränk- (to take away; restrain oneself, hold back), Latvian brankti (lying close), Lithuanian branktas (whiffletree)).

Verb

bring (third-person singular simple present brings, present participle bringing, simple past and past participle brought)

  1. (transitive, ditransitive) To transport toward somebody/somewhere.
    • At twilight in the summer [] the mice come out. They [] eat the luncheon crumbs. Mr. Checkly, for instance, always brought his dinner in a paper parcel in his coat-tail pocket, and ate it when so disposed, sprinkling crumbs lavishly [] on the floor.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To supply or contribute.
  3. (transitive) To occasion or bring about.
    The controversial TV broadcast brought a storm of complaints.
  4. (transitive) To raise (a lawsuit, charges, etc.) against somebody.
  5. To persuade; to induce; to draw; to lead; to guide.
  6. To produce in exchange; to sell for; to fetch.
  7. (baseball) To pitch, often referring to a particularly hard thrown fastball.
Conjugation
Usage notes
  • Past brang and past participle brung and broughten forms are sometimes used in some dialects, especially in informal speech.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Onomatopeia.

Interjection

bring

  1. The sound of a telephone ringing.

Afrikaans

Alternative forms

  • breng (archaic)

Etymology

From Dutch bringen, a dialectal variant of standard brengen (to bring). Both forms were originally distinct, though related, verbs, but were early on conflated.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brəŋ/

Verb

bring (present bring, present participle bringende, past participle gebring)

  1. (transitive) to bring; to deliver
  2. (transitive) to take; to lead (to another place)
    Bring asseblief hierdie borde kombuis toe.

    Please, take these dishes to the kitchen.

Derived terms

  • uitbring
  • wegbring

Danish

Verb

bring

  1. imperative of bringe

Garo

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

bring

  1. jungle, forest

German

Pronunciation

Verb

bring

  1. imperative singular of bringen

Middle English

Verb

bring

  1. Alternative form of bryngen

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian bringa, which derives from Proto-Germanic *bringaną. Cognates include West Frisian bringe.

Verb

bring

  1. (Föhr-Amrum), (Heligoland) to bring

Conjugation


Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

bring

  1. imperative of bringe

Scots

Etymology

From Middle English bryngen, from Old English bringan.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brɪŋ/

Verb

bring (third-person singular present brings, present participle bringin, past brocht, past participle brocht)

  1. To bring.


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪnstɪt(j)uːt/, /ˈɪnstɪtʃuːt/

Etymology 1

From French institut, from Middle French, from Latin īnstitūtum.

Noun

institute (plural institutes)

  1. An organization founded to promote a cause
  2. An institution of learning; a college, especially for technical subjects
  3. The building housing such an institution
  4. (obsolete) The act of instituting; institution.
  5. (obsolete) That which is instituted, established, or fixed, such as a law, habit, or custom.
    • 1837, Robert Huish, The History of the Life and Reign of William IV, the Reform Monarch of England,
      They made a sort of institute and digest of anarchy.
    • to make the Stoic institutes thy own
  6. (law, Scotland) The person to whom an estate is first given by destination or limitation.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Tomlins to this entry?)
Derived terms
  • educational institute
  • research institute
  • academic institute
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English, from Latin īnstitūtus, past participle of īnstituō (I set up, place upon, purpose, begin, institute), from in (in, on) + statuō (set up, establish).

Verb

institute (third-person singular simple present institutes, present participle instituting, simple past and past participle instituted)

  1. (transitive) To begin or initiate (something); to found.
    He instituted the new policy of having children walk through a metal detector to enter school.
    • 1776, Thomas Jefferson, Declaration of Independence:
      Whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, and to institute a new government.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To train, instruct.
    • Publius was the first that ever instituted the Souldier to manage his armes by dexteritie and skil, and joyned art unto vertue, not for the use of private contentions, but for the wars and Roman peoples quarrels.
    • a. 1684, author unknown, Gentleman’s Calling
      If children were early instituted, knowledge would insensibly insinuate itself.
  3. To nominate; to appoint.
  4. (ecclesiastical, law) To invest with the spiritual charge of a benefice, or the care of souls.
Translations

Adjective

institute (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Established; organized; founded.
    • 1551, Ralph Robinson (sometimes spelt Raphe Robynson) (translator), Utopia (originally written by Sir Thomas More)
      They have but few laws. For to a people so instruct and institute, very few to suffice.

Related terms

  • institution
  • institutional

Further reading

  • institute in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • institute in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • institute at OneLook Dictionary Search

Latin

Participle

īnstitūte

  1. vocative masculine singular of īnstitūtus

References

  • institute in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

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