briny vs main what difference

what is difference between briny and main

English

Etymology

brine +‎ -y

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɹaɪni/

Adjective

briny (comparative brinier or more briny, superlative briniest or most briny)

  1. Of, pertaining to, resembling or containing brine; salty.

Translations

Noun

the briny

  1. (slang) The sea.

Translations


Cornish

Alternative forms

  • brini

Noun

briny m pl

  1. plural of bran (crow)


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: mān, IPA(key): /meɪn/
  • Rhymes: -eɪn
  • Homophones: mane, Maine

Etymology 1

From Middle English mayn, main, maine, mæin, meyn, from main (noun) (see further at etymology 2); compare Old English mægen- (strong, main, principal) (used in combination) and Old Norse megn, megenn (strong, main). The word is cognate with Old High German megīn (strong, mighty) (modern German Möge, Vermögen (power, wealth)), and also akin to Old English magan (to be able to). See also may.

Adjective

main (not comparable)

  1. Of chief or leading importance; prime, principal. [from 15th c.]
    • 1663, John Tillotson, The Wisdom of being Religious
      Religion direct us rather to ſecure inward peace than outward eaſe, to be more careful to avoid everlaſting and intolerable torment than ſhort and light afflictions which are but for a moment; [] In a word, our main intereſt is to be as happy as we can, and as long as is poſſible; and if we be caſt into ſuch circumſtances, that we muſt be either in part and for a time or elſe wholly and always miſerable, the beſt wiſdom is to chuſe the greateſt and moſt laſting happiness, but the leaſt and ſhorteſt miſery.
  2. Chief, most important, or principal in extent, size, or strength; consisting of the largest part.
    Synonym: largest
  3. (archaic, of force, strength, etc.) Full, sheer, undivided. [from 16th c.]
  4. (dialectal) Big; angry.
  5. (nautical) Belonging to or connected with the principal mast in a vessel.
  6. (obsolete) Great in size or degree; important, powerful, strong, vast.
Derived terms
Translations

Adverb

main (comparative more main, superlative most main)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) Exceedingly, extremely, greatly, mightily, very, very much.

Verb

main (third-person singular simple present mains, present participle maining, simple past and past participle mained)

  1. (transitive) Short for mainline (to inject (a drug) directly into a vein).
  2. (transitive, gaming) To mainly play a specific character or side, or with specific equipment, during a game.
  3. (obsolete) To convert (a road) into a main or primary road.

Etymology 2

From Middle English mayn, main, maine, mæine, mæȝen, from Old English mæġen (strength), from Proto-Germanic *maginą (strength, power, might), *maginaz (strong), from Proto-Indo-European *megʰ- (be able). The word is cognate with Old High German magen, megin, Old Norse magn, megn, megin, Old Saxon megin. More recent senses are derived from the adjective.

Noun

main (plural mains)

  1. That which is chief or principal; the chief or main portion; the bulk, the greater part, gross.
    1. (video games) The primary character that one plays in a video game in which one can play more than one character.
      Antonym: alt
  2. A large cable or pipe providing utility service to an area or a building, such as a water main or electric main. [from 17th c.]
  3. (informal) Short for main course (the principal dish of a meal).
  4. (now poetic) The high seas. [from 16th c.]
  5. (now archaic, US dialectal) The mainland. [from 16th c.]
  6. (nautical) Short for mainsail. [from 17th c.]
  7. (obsolete, except in might and main) Force, power, strength, violent effort. [from 9th c.]
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Origin uncertain; probably from the adjective main. Evidence is lacking for a derivation from French main (hand).

Noun

main (plural mains)

  1. (obsolete, gaming) A hand or match in a game of dice.
  2. (obsolete, gaming) The largest throw in a match at dice; in the game of hazard, a number from one to nine called out by a person before the dice are thrown.
  3. (obsolete, gaming) A stake played for at dice.
  4. (obsolete, gaming, sports) A sporting contest or match, especially a cockfighting match.
  5. A banker’s shovel for coins.

Etymology 4

Origin uncertain, possibly from French main (hand).

Noun

main (plural mains)

  1. (obsolete, rare) A basket for gathering grapes.

References

Further reading

  • main (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Main (power) in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • Amin, Iman, Mani, Mian, Mina, NAMI, NIMA, Naim, amin, iman, mani, mina

Cimbrian

Alternative forms

  • moi (Luserna)

Etymology

From Middle High German mīn, form Old High German mīn, from Proto-West Germanic *mīn, from Proto-Germanic *mīnaz (my, mine). Cognate with German mein, English mine.

Determiner

main (plural main, bon/dar maindarn) (Sette Comuni)

  1. (attributive) my
  2. (predicative) mine

Usage notes

The following rules apply to all Sette Comuni Cimbrian possessive determiners:

  • They are inflected by number and gender in only exclamations (i.e. vocative case).
  • Before nouns, they are inflected for number only and follow the corresponding definite article (a form of dar).
    • The plural ending is -en, or -∅ when the pronoun itself ends in -n.
  • Predicatively, they are uninflected and the definite article is not used.
  • Following bon (of) or dar (the only surviving trace of a genitive definite article; used for all numbers and genders) they end in -darn.

Inflection

See also

References

  • “main” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Dalmatian

Etymology

From Latin mēne, from . Compare Romanian mine.

Pronoun

main

  1. (first-person singular pronoun, oblique case) me

Related terms

  • me
  • ju

Finnish

Noun

main

  1. Instructive plural form of maa.

See also

  • jossain näillä main

Anagrams

  • mani, mina, nami

French

Etymology

From Middle French main, Old French main, mein, man, from Latin manus (hand), from Proto-Italic *manus, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)meh₂- (to beckon). Compare Spanish mano.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɛ̃/
  • Homophones: mains, maint, maints
  • Hyphenation: main

Noun

main f (plural mains)

  1. hand
  2. (soccer) handball
  3. (poker) hand
  4. quire

Synonyms

  • louche
  • mimine
  • paluche
  • pince

Meronyms

  • doigt
  • dos
  • paume
  • poignet
  • pouce

Holonyms

  • bras

Derived terms

Related terms

  • manche
  • manicle
  • manier
  • manipuler
  • manivelle
  • manuel

Descendants

  • German: Lamäng

Further reading

  • “main” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • mina

Indonesian

Etymology

From Malay main, from Proto-Malayic *maim, a reduction from Pre-Malayic *q-um-ayam, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qayam (domesticated animal, toy). Related to ayam (chicken).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /main/
  • Hyphenation: main

Verb

main (bermain)

  1. to play

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “main” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Kaiep

Noun

main

  1. woman

Further reading

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988)
  • Stephen Adolphe Wurm, New Guinea Area Languages and Language Study (1976)

Malay

Etymology

A phonemical reduction from Pre-Malayic *q-um-ayam, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qayam.

Pronunciation

  • (Johor-Selangor) IPA(key): /maen/
  • (Riau-Lingga) IPA(key): /maɪn/
  • Rhymes: -aen, -en

Verb

main (Jawi spelling ماءين, used in the form bermain)

  1. to play

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Indonesian: main

References

  • “main” in Kamus Dewan, Fourth Edition, Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka, →ISBN, 2005.
  • “main” in Pusat Rujukan Persuratan Melayu | Malay Literary Reference Centre, Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka, 2017.

Middle English

Noun

main

  1. Alternative form of mayn

Adjective

main

  1. Alternative form of mayn

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French main, mein, man, from Latin manus.

Noun

main f (plural mains)

  1. (anatomy) hand

Descendants

  • French: main

Norman

Alternative forms

  • man (continental Normandy)
  • môin (Guernsey)

Etymology

From Old French main, mein, man, from Latin manus (hand), from Proto-Indo-European *man-.

Pronunciation

Noun

main f (plural mains)

  1. (Jersey, anatomy) hand

Derived terms

  • brînge à main f (brush)
  • marté à deux mains m (sledgehammer)

Related terms

  • (finger)

Northern Sami

Pronoun

main

  1. locative plural of mii

Old French

Alternative forms

  • mein, man

Etymology

From Latin manus.

Noun

main f (oblique plural mainz, nominative singular main, nominative plural mainz)

  1. (anatomy) hand

Descendants

  • Middle French: main
    • French: main
  • Norman: main
  • Walloon: mwin

Welsh

Etymology

Cognate with Breton moan, Cornish moon.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mai̯n/

Adjective

main (feminine singular main, plural meinion, equative meined, comparative meinach, superlative meinaf)

  1. slender, thin
    Synonym: tenau
  2. fine
    Synonym: mân

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