bristle vs uprise what difference

what is difference between bristle and uprise

English

Etymology

From Middle English bristil, bristel, brustel, from Old English bristl, *brystl, *byrstel, from Proto-West Germanic *burstilu, diminutive of Proto-West Germanic *bursti, from Proto-Germanic *burstiz (compare Dutch borstel, German Borste (boar’s bristle), Icelandic burst), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰr̥stís (compare Middle Irish brostaid (to goad, spur), Latin fastīgium (top), Polish barszcz (hogweed)), equivalent to brust +‎ -le.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɹɪs.l̩/
  • (dated, rural folk speech of New England and Upstate New York) IPA(key): /ˈbɹʌs.l̩/
  • Rhymes: -ɪsəl

Noun

bristle (plural bristles)

  1. A stiff or coarse hair.
    the bristles of a pig
  2. The hairs or other filaments that make up a brush, broom, or similar item.

Derived terms

  • bristlet

Translations

Verb

bristle (third-person singular simple present bristles, present participle bristling, simple past and past participle bristled)

  1. To rise or stand erect, like bristles.
  2. abound, to have an abundance of something
  3. (with at) To be on one’s guard or raise one’s defenses; to react with fear, suspicion, or distance.
  4. To fix a bristle to.
    to bristle a thread

Derived terms

  • bristling

Translations

References

  • bristle at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Bitlers, Liberts, blister, reblits, riblets


English

Etymology

From Middle English uprisen, from Old English *ūprīsan (to rise up), equivalent to up- +‎ rise. Cognate with Icelandic upprisa (resurrection), Middle Low German oprīsinge (uprising). Compare also Icelandic uppreisn (an uprising, revolt).

Verb

uprise (third-person singular simple present uprises, present participle uprising, simple past uprose, past participle uprisen)

  1. (archaic) To rise; to get up; to appear from below the horizon.
    • 1874, Marcus Clarke, For the Term of His Natural Life Chapter VI
      The great sky uprose from this silent sea without a cloud. The stars hung low in its expanse, burning in a violent mist of lower ether.
  2. (archaic) To have an upward direction or inclination
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Vision of Sin
      Uprose the mystic mountain range.
  3. To rebel or revolt; to take part in an uprising.
    • 1998, William B. Griffen, Apaches at War and Peace (page 92)
      They had decided to uprise rather than face punishment, and they wanted all the help they could get.

Noun

uprise (plural uprises)

  1. The act of rising; appearance above the horizon; rising.

Related terms

  • uprist

References

Anagrams

  • Epirus, rise up

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