broadsheet vs circular what difference

what is difference between broadsheet and circular

English

Etymology

broad +‎ sheet

Noun

broadsheet (plural broadsheets)

  1. A newspaper having pages of standard dimensions (as opposed to a tabloid), especially one that carries serious treatment of news.
    • 2004, Alan Hollinghurst, The Line of Beauty, Bloomsbury, 2005, Chapter 11 (iv),
      He glanced across at Wani, who was screened above the knees by the raised pink broadsheet with its headlines about record share prices, record house prices.

Synonyms

  • quality newspaper

Antonyms

  • tabloid
  • yellow journalism

Adjective

broadsheet (not comparable)

  1. In the format of a broadsheet.
  2. Relating to a broadsheet or broadsheets.
    broadsheet journalism

Translations

See also

  • compact

Anagrams

  • sheetboard


English

Etymology

From Middle English circuler, circuleer, circulere, from Old French circulier, from Late Latin circularis, from Latin circulus, diminutive of circus (ring).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈsɜːk.jə.lə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈsɝk.jə.lɚ/
  • Hyphenation: cir‧cu‧lar

Adjective

circular (comparative more circular, superlative most circular)

  1. Of or relating to a circle.
  2. In the shape of, or moving in a circle.
  3. Circuitous or roundabout.
  4. Referring back to itself, so as to prevent computation or comprehension; infinitely recursive.
    circular reasoning
    Your dictionary defines “brave” as “courageous”, and “courageous” as “brave”. That’s a circular definition.
    a circular formula in a spreadsheet
  5. Distributed to a large number of persons.
    • 1827, Henry Hallam, The Constitutional History of England
      a proclamation of Henry III., [] doubtless circular throughout England
  6. (obsolete) Perfect; complete.
    • 1632, Philip Massinger, Maid of Honour, act I, scene 2:
      A man so absolute and circular / In all those wished-for rarities that may take / A virgin captive.
  7. (archaic) Adhering to a fixed circle of legends; cyclic; hence, mean; inferior.
    • February 1, 1711, John Dennis, on the Genius and Writings of Shakespeare
      Had Virgil been a circular poet, and closely adhered to history, how could the Romans have had Dido?

Synonyms

  • ringlike
  • ring-shaped
  • round-like

Hyponyms

  • semicircular

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Noun

circular (plural circulars)

  1. Synonym of flyer: a printed advertisement, directive, or notice intended for mass circulation.
    • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 55:
      The pigeon-hole was also stuffed with circulars and hand-bills.
  2. Short for circular letter.
  3. Short for circular file.
  4. (dated) A sleeveless cloak cut from a circular pattern.
  5. A shuttle bus with a circular route.

See also

  • advertisement
  • booklet
  • brochure
  • catalogue, catalog
  • flier, flyer
  • handbill, hand bill
  • junk mail
  • leaflet
  • pamphlet

Verb

circular (third-person singular simple present circulars, present participle circularing, simple past and past participle circulared)

  1. To distribute circulars to or at.
  2. To extend in a circular direction.

Asturian

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin circularis, from Latin circulus.

Adjective

circular (epicene, plural circulares)

  1. circular

Related terms

  • círculu

Verb

circular (first-person singular indicative present circulo, past participle circuláu)

  1. to circle

Conjugation

Related terms

  • círculu

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /siɾ.kuˈla/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /sir.kuˈla/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /siɾ.kuˈlaɾ/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Late Latin circularis, from Latin circulus.

Adjective

circular (masculine and feminine plural circulars)

  1. circular

Noun

circular f (plural circulars)

  1. circular

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Late Latin circulo, circulare, post-Augustan form of Latin circulor.

Verb

circular (first-person singular present circulo, past participle circulat)

  1. to circulate
  2. to move, to travel

Conjugation

Related terms

  • cercle

Further reading

  • “circular” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “circular” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “circular” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “circular” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Galician

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin circularis, from Latin circulus.

Adjective

circular m or f (plural circulares)

  1. (geometry) circular

Related terms

  • círculo

Portuguese

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Late Latin circulāris (circular round), from Latin circulus, corresponding to círculo +‎ -ar.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: cir‧cu‧lar

Adjective

circular m or f (plural circulares, comparable)

  1. circular; round
    Synonyms: redondo, rotundo
  2. running in a loop
  3. (rhetoric, lexicography) circular (referring back to itself)
  4. circular (distributed to a large number of people)

Noun

circular f (plural circulares)

  1. circular letter (official communication distributed to interested parties)
  2. (Portugal) ring road
    Synonyms: (Portugal) circunvalação, (Brazil) anel rodoviário, (Brazil) rodoanel

Noun

circular m (plural circulares)

  1. (Brazil) circular (shuttle bus that runs in a loop)

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Latin circulō, circulāre (I make round), post-Augustan form of Latin circulor.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: cir‧cu‧lar

Verb

circular (first-person singular present indicative circulo, past participle circulado)

  1. (transitive) to circle (to place a circle around)
    Synonym: circundar
  2. (intransitive) to circle (to move around an axis)
    Synonyms: girar, rodar
  3. (intransitive) to circulate (to move through a circuit)
  4. (intransitive) to flow freely
  5. (intransitive, or transitive with por) to move about; to walk around
  6. (transitive) to circulate; to disseminate; to spread
  7. (intransitive) to circulate; to be disseminated; to be spread; to go around
    1. (economics) to circulate (to be valid as currency)
    2. (media) to circulate (to be published and distributed)
Conjugation

Romanian

Etymology

From French circulaire

Adjective

circular m or n (feminine singular circulară, masculine plural circulari, feminine and neuter plural circulare)

  1. circular

Declension


Spanish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Late Latin circulāris, from Latin circulus.

Adjective

circular (plural circulares)

  1. circular

Noun

circular f (plural circulares)

  1. circular (advertisement)

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Late Latin circulāre, present active infinitive of circulō, post-Augustan form of Latin circulor. Doublet of the inherited cerchar.

Verb

circular (first-person singular present circulo, first-person singular preterite circulé, past participle circulado)

  1. to circulate
  2. to go round, move around
  3. to scram, clear off
Conjugation

Related terms

  • círculo

References


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