brogan vs brogue what difference

what is difference between brogan and brogue

English

Etymology

From Old Irish brògan.

Noun

brogan (plural brogans)

  1. A heavy working shoe; a brogue.

Anagrams

  • Bagnor, Bangor, Bognar, barong, brag on


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: brōg, IPA(key): /bɹoʊɡ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: brōg, IPA(key): /bɹəʊɡ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊɡ

Etymology 1

From Irish bróg (boot, shoe). The “accent” sense may instead be derived from Irish barróg (a hold (on the tongue)).

Noun

brogue (plural brogues)

  1. A strong dialectal accent. In Ireland it used to be a term for Irish spoken with a strong English accent, but gradually changed to mean English spoken with a strong Irish accent as English control of Ireland gradually increased and Irish waned as the standard language.
    • 1978, Louis L’Amour, Fair Blows the Wind, Bantam Books, page 62:
      I had no doubt he knew where I was from, for I had the brogue, although not much of it.
    • 2010, Clare Vanderpool, Moon Over Manifest, Random House, page 187:
      “No-man’s-land.” The words were spoken in a deep voice filled with salt water and brogue.
  2. A strong Oxford shoe, with ornamental perforations and wing tips.
  3. (dated) A heavy shoe of untanned leather.
Synonyms
  • (heavy shoe): brogan
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

brogue (third-person singular simple present brogues, present participle broguing, simple past and past participle brogued)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To speak with a brogue (accent).
  2. (intransitive) To walk.
  3. (transitive) To kick.
  4. (transitive) To punch a hole in, as with an awl.

See also

  • Brogue shoe on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

Possibly from French brouiller.

Verb

brogue (third-person singular simple present brogues, present participle broguing, simple past and past participle brogued)

  1. (dialect) to fish for eels by disturbing the waters.

Anagrams

  • Burgeo

Yola

Etymology

Borrowed from Irish bróg.

Noun

brogue

  1. shoe

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith

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