brokenheartedness vs grief what difference

what is difference between brokenheartedness and grief

English

Etymology

brokenhearted +‎ -ness

Noun

brokenheartedness (uncountable)

  1. The quality of being brokenhearted.


English

Etymology

From Middle English greef, gref, from Old French grief (grave, heavy, grievous, sad), from Latin gravis (heavy, grievous, sad). Doublet of grave.

Alternative forms

  • greefe (obsolete), griefe (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹiːf/
  • Rhymes: -iːf

Noun

grief (countable and uncountable, plural griefs or grieves)

  1. Suffering, hardship. [from early 13th c.]
  2. Emotional pain, generally arising from misfortune, significant personal loss, bereavement, misconduct of oneself or others, etc.; sorrow; sadness. [from early 14th c.]
  3. (countable) Cause or instance of sorrow or pain; that which afflicts or distresses; trial.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

grief (third-person singular simple present griefs, present participle griefing, simple past and past participle griefed)

  1. (online gaming) To deliberately harass and annoy or cause grief to other players of a game in order to interfere with their enjoyment of it; especially, to do this as one’s primary activity in the game. [from late 1990s]

Usage notes

  • This verb is most commonly found in the gerund-participle griefing and the derived noun griefer.

Related terms

  • grievance
  • grieve
  • grievous

Further reading

  • grief on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • griefer on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • grief in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • grief in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • grief at OneLook Dictionary Search

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch grief, from Old French grief, from Vulgar Latin *grevis, from Latin gravis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣrif/
  • Hyphenation: grief
  • Rhymes: -if

Noun

grief f (plural grieven, diminutive griefje n)

  1. (chiefly in the plural) grievance, complaint, bone to pick, issue

Derived terms

  • grieven

French

Etymology

From Old French grief, from Vulgar Latin grevis, from Latin gravis (later influenced by its antonym levis), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gʷréh₂us. Doublet of grave.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʁi.jɛf/

Adjective

grief (feminine singular griève, masculine plural griefs, feminine plural grièves)

  1. (archaic, literary) grievous

Derived terms

  • grièvement

Noun

grief m (plural griefs)

  1. complaint
  2. grief
  3. grievance (formal complaint filed with an authority)

Further reading

  • “grief” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • figer

Ladin

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *grevis, from Latin gravis.

Adjective

grief m (feminine singular grieva, masculine plural griefs, feminine plural grieves)

  1. arduous
  2. difficult
  3. steep

Old French

Alternative forms

  • gref (typically Anglo-Norman)

Etymology

Probably from the verb grever, or from Vulgar Latin grevis (influenced by its antonym, levis), from Latin gravis.

Noun

grief m (oblique plural griés, nominative singular griés, nominative plural grief)

  1. pain; anguish; suffering

Descendants

  • French: grief
  • Middle Dutch: grief
    • Dutch: grief
  • Middle English: greef, gref
    • English: grief

Adjective

grief m (oblique and nominative feminine singular grieve)

  1. sad

Descendants

  • French: grief (archaic, literary)

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