bromide vs commonplace what difference

what is difference between bromide and commonplace

English

Etymology

From brom(ine) + -ide. First used in the sense “dull person” by Gelett Burgess.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: brō’mīd, IPA(key): /ˈbɹəʊ.maɪd/
  • (US) enPR: brō’mīd, IPA(key): /ˈbɹoʊ.maɪd/
  • Hyphenation: bro‧mide

Noun

bromide (plural bromides)

  1. (inorganic chemistry) A binary compound of bromine and some other element or radical.
  2. A dose of bromide taken as a sedative, or to reduce sexual appetite.
  3. (by extension) A dull person with conventional thoughts.
    Antonym: sulphite
  4. A platitude.
    Synonyms: platitude; see also Thesaurus:saying
  5. (photography) A print made on bromide paper.

Derived terms

Translations

Further reading

  • bromide on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • bromide (language) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References

Anagrams

  • embroid

Dutch

Etymology

Probably borrowed. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌbroːˈmi.də/
  • Hyphenation: bro‧mi‧de
  • Rhymes: -idə

Noun

bromide f (uncountable)

  1. (inorganic chemistry) bromide
  2. bromide (sedative)

Derived terms

  • kaliumbromide
  • lithiumbromide


English

Etymology

A calque of Latin locus commūnis, referring to a generally applicable literary passage, itself a calque of Ancient Greek κοινὸς τόπος (koinòs tópos).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkɑmənˌpleɪs/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkɒmənˌpleɪs/
  • Hyphenation: com‧mon‧place

Adjective

commonplace (comparative more commonplace, superlative most commonplace)

  1. Ordinary; not having any remarkable characteristics.
    Synonyms: routine, undistinguished, unexceptional; see also Thesaurus:hackneyed
    Antonyms: distinguished, inimitable, unique

Translations

Noun

commonplace (plural commonplaces)

  1. A platitude or cliché.
  2. Something that is ordinary; something commonly done or occurring.
  3. A memorandum; something to be frequently consulted or referred to.
    • 1710, Jonathan Swift, A Discourse concerning the Mechanical Operation of the Spirit
      Whatever, in my reading, occurs concerning this our fellow creature, I do never fail to set it down by way of common-place.
  4. A commonplace book.

Translations

Verb

commonplace (third-person singular simple present commonplaces, present participle commonplacing, simple past and past participle commonplaced)

  1. To make a commonplace book.
  2. To enter in a commonplace book, or to reduce to general heads.
    • 1711, Henry Felton, Dissertation on Reading the Classics
      I do not apprehend any difficulty in collecting and commonplacing an universal history from the [] historians.
  3. (obsolete) To utter commonplaces; to indulge in platitudes.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)

Related terms

  • commonplace book

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