brother vs comrade what difference

what is difference between brother and comrade

English

Alternative forms

  • brotha (Jamaican English, AAVE)
  • brothah
  • brothuh

Etymology

From Middle English brother, from Old English brōþor, from Proto-West Germanic *brōþer, from Proto-Germanic *brōþēr (compare North Frisian Bröðer, West Frisian broer, Dutch broeder, German Bruder, Danish broder, Norwegian bror), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr (compare Irish bráthair, Welsh brawd, Latin frāter, Ancient Greek φράτηρ (phrátēr), Armenian եղբայր (ełbayr), Tocharian A pracar, Tocharian B procer, Russian брат (brat), Lithuanian brolis, Persian برادر(barādar),Northern Kurdish bira, Sanskrit भ्रातृ (bhrātṛ)). Doublet of frater, friar, and pal.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbɹʌðə(ɹ)/
  • (US) enPR: brŭth’ər, IPA(key): /ˈbɹʌðɚ/
  • (General New Zealand) enPR: brŭth’ə(r), IPA(key): /ˈbɹɐðɘ(ɹ)/
  • (th-fronting) enPR: brŭvˈə(r), IPA(key): /ˈbɹʌvə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -ʌðə(r)

Noun

brother (plural brothers or (archaic in most senses) brethren)

  1. Son of the same parents as another person.
  2. A male having at least one parent in common with another (see half-brother, stepbrother).
  3. A male fellow member of a religious community, church, trades union etc.
    • 1975, New King James Version, Deuteronomy 23:19
      You shall not charge interest to your brother—interest on money or food or anything that is lent out at interest.
  4. (informal, dated) A form of address to a man.
  5. (African-American Vernacular) A black male.
    • 1991 January, SPIN, vol. 6, no. 10, page 58:
      SPIN: Aren’t you both as popular with white people as black people?
      L.L.: Oh, no question. But I’ve always said, that’s why when people say, “L.L., hey, like, on the last album, you sold out,” I say, “Yo, can I ask you a question, Mike Tyson sell out?” “No, he’s a brother.” I say, he’s a cross-over artist. He went pop. You know what I’m saying? I mean, the rap audience […] they have to understand that their music is for all people. Me personally, I don’t think it’s about being black or white, []
  6. Somebody, usually male, connected by a common cause or situation.
    • 1963, Martin Luther King Jr.
      The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny.
  7. Someone who is a peer, whether male or female.
    • And, above all, no animal must ever tyrannise over his own kind. Weak or strong, clever or simple, we are all brothers.

Usage notes

  • The plural “brethren” (cf. “sistren”, “sistern”) is not used for biological brothers in contemporary English (although it was in older usage). It still finds use, however, in the meaning of “members of a religious order”. It is also sometimes used in other figurative senses, e.g. “adherents of the same religion”, “countrymen”, and the like.

Coordinate terms

  • (with regards to gender): sister

Hypernyms

  • (son of common parents): sibling

Derived terms

Related terms

  • Abbreviations: bro, brah, bra, bruh, bruv
  • friar
  • fraternal
  • fraternity

Descendants

  • Bahamian Creole: bredda
  • Belizean Creole: breda
  • Bislama: brata
  • Cameroon Pidgin: bro̱da
  • Gullah: broda
  • Hawaiian Creole: braddah
  • Islander Creole English: broda
  • Japanese: ブラザー
  • Kabuverdianu: bróda
  • Korean: 브라더 (beuradeo)
  • Krio: brohda
  • Nicaraguan Creole: brada
  • Nigerian Pidgin: broda
  • Pichinglis: brɔda
  • Pijin: brata
  • Saramaccan: baáa
  • Sranan Tongo: brada
    • Dutch: brada
  • Tok Pisin: brata, barata
  • Portuguese: bróder, bródi, brother, brada

Translations

See brother/translations § Noun.

Verb

brother (third-person singular simple present brothers, present participle brothering, simple past and past participle brothered)

  1. (transitive) To treat as a brother.
    • 1819, Walter Scott, Ivanhoe:
      Seest thou not we are overreached, and that our proposed mode of communicating with our friends without has been disconcerted by this same motley gentleman thou art so fond to brother?

Translations

See brother/translations § Verb.

Interjection

brother

  1. Expressing exasperation.
    We’re being forced to work overtime? Oh, brother!

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • broþer, broþir, broþur, broder, broðer, brothir, brothur, broiþer, bruther, brodir, broder, brothre, broþre, brodyr
  • (Ormulum) broþerr

Etymology

From Old English brōþor, from Proto-West Germanic *brōþer, from Proto-Germanic *brōþēr, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr. Doublet of frere.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbroːðər/

Noun

brother (plural brether or bretheren or brotheren or (rare) brothers, genitive brother or brothers)

  1. A brother or brother-in-law; a male sibling.
  2. A (Christian) man (i.e. as a “brother in life/brother in Christ”).
  3. A blood brother; one in a mutual pact of loyalty between two.
  4. Another member of a religious community or order (when one is a member)
  5. Another member of a guild or craft association (when one is a member)
  6. A male individual who one has a close platonic relationship with.
  7. (rare) One of one’s peers as a ruler; (another) ruler.
  8. (rare) A relative or family member who is a man.
  9. (rare, alchemy) Something similar to something else.

Related terms

  • brotherhede
  • brother-in-lawe
  • brotherles
  • brotherly
  • brotherwort

Descendants

  • English: brother (see there for further descendants)
  • Scots: brither, bruther, broder, bruder
  • Yola: brover, brower

References

  • “brọ̄ther, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-02-21.

Old Frisian

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *brōþēr.

Noun

brōther m

  1. brother

Descendants

  • North Frisian:
    Amrum: bruder
    Föhr: bruler
    Northern Goesharder: (Hoolmer) broor, (Hoorninger) brår
    Southern Goesharder: brööðer
    Hallig: bröör
    Halunder: Bruur
    Mooring: brouder
    Söl’ring: Bröðer
  • Saterland Frisian: Brúur, Brour
  • West Frisian: broer

Portuguese

Noun

brother m (plural brothers)

  1. Alternative spelling of bróder


English

Alternative forms

  • comrad

Etymology

From late Middle English comered, from Middle French camarade, from Spanish camarada or Italian camerata, from Medieval Latin *camarata, from Latin camara, camera (a chamber); see chamber. Compare camaraderie.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkɒmɹeɪd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkɑmɹæd/, /ˈkɑmɹəd/

Noun

comrade (plural comrades)

  1. A mate, companion, or associate.
  2. A companion in battle; fellow soldier.
  3. (communism) A fellow socialist, communist or other similarly politically aligned person.
  4. (communism) A non-hierarchical title, functionally similar to “Mr.”, “Mrs.”, “Miss”, “Ms.” etc, in a communist or socialist state.

Synonyms

  • see also Thesaurus:friend
  • (title): compare sister, brother
  • battle buddy
  • tovarish
  • compagno

Related terms

Translations

Verb

comrade (third-person singular simple present comrades, present participle comrading, simple past and past participle comraded)

  1. (transitive) To associate with in a friendly way.
    • 1916, Mark Twain, The Mysterious Stranger
      But she was happy, for she was far away under another sky, and comrading again with her Rangers, and her animal friends, and the soldiers.

Further reading

  • comrade in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • comrade in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • DeMarco, Demarco, Mercado, caromed, dome car

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