brouhaha vs katzenjammer what difference

what is difference between brouhaha and katzenjammer

English

Etymology

Borrowed from French brouhaha, but disputed as to where from before that. Possibly from Hebrew בָּרוּךְ הַבָּא(barúkh habá, welcome, literally blessed is he who comes).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbɹuː.hɑː.hɑː/

Noun

brouhaha (plural brouhahas)

  1. A stir; a fuss or uproar.
    Synonyms: commotion, hubbub, kerfuffle; see also Thesaurus:commotion

Translations


French

Etymology

Disputed. Possibly from an onomatopoeic assimilation from Hebrew בָּרוּךְ הַבָּא(barúkh habá, welcome, literally blessed is he who comes)

In regards to the semantic evolution to “noisy meeting” compare with ramdam, sabbat

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʁu.a.a/

Noun

brouhaha m (plural brouhahas)

  1. brouhaha
    • 1865, Jules Verne, De la Terre à la Lune:
      Un brouhaha, une tempête d’exclamations accueillit ces paroles.

      A brouhaha, a gale of exclamations welcomed those words.

References

  • “brouhaha” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).
  • Michael Quinion (2004), “Brouhaha”, in Ballyhoo, Buckaroo, and Spuds: Ingenious Tales of Words and Their Origins, Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Books in association with Penguin Books, →ISBN.

Further reading

  • “brouhaha” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Alternative forms

  • Katzenjammer

Etymology

Borrowed from German Katzenjammer (hangover, literally the wailing of cats); a determinative compound formed from Katze (cat) +‎ -n- +‎ Jammer (wailing; lamentation).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkætsənd͡ʒæmə(ɹ)/

Noun

katzenjammer (plural katzenjammers)

  1. A hangover.
  2. Jitters; discord; confusion.
  3. Depression.

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