brow vs forehead what difference

what is difference between brow and forehead

English

Etymology

From Middle English browe, from Old English brū, from Proto-Germanic *brūwō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃bʰrúHs (brow) (compare Middle Irish brúad, Tocharian B pärwāne (eyebrows), Lithuanian bruvìs, Serbo-Croatian obrva, Russian бровь (brovʹ), Ancient Greek ὀφρύς (ophrús), Sanskrit भ्रू (bhrū)), Persian ابرو(abrū, eyebrow)).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /bɹaʊ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ

Noun

brow (plural brows)

  1. The ridge over the eyes; the eyebrow.
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, As You Like It, Act III Scene v[1]:
      ‘Tis not your inky brows, your black silk hair, / Your bugle eyeballs, nor your cheek of cream / That can entame my spirits to your worship.
    • c. 1763, Charles Churchill (satirist)\Charles Churchill, The Ghost
      And his arch’d brow, pulled o’er his eyes, / With solemn proof proclaims him wise.
  2. The first tine of an antler’s beam.
  3. The forehead.
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 1, Act II Scene iii[2]:
      Thy spirit within thee hath been so at war,
      And thus hath so bestirr’d thee in thy sleep,
      That beads of sweat have stood upon thy brow
      Like bubbles in a late-disturb’d stream, []
  4. The projecting upper edge of a steep place such as a hill.
    the brow of a precipice
  5. (mining) A gallery in a coal mine running across the face of the coal.
  6. (figuratively) Aspect; appearance.
  7. (nautical) The gangway from ship to shore when a ship is lying alongside a quay.
  8. (nautical) The hinged part of a landing craft or ferry which is lowered to form a landing platform; a ramp.

Synonyms

  • forehead

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

brow (third-person singular simple present brows, present participle browing, simple past and past participle browed)

  1. To bound or limit; to be at, or form, the edge of.
    • 1634, John Milton, Comus
      Tending my flocks hard by i’ the hilly crofts / That brow this bottom glade.

Middle English

Noun

brow

  1. Alternative form of browe

Norn

Etymology

From Old Norse brauð, from Proto-Germanic *braudą. Compare Shetlandic brau.

Noun

brow

  1. (Orkney) bread

Plautdietsch

Adjective

brow

  1. brave, audacious, daring, courageous, dauntless, intrepid


English

Etymology

From Middle English forhed, forheed, from Old English fōrehēafod, foranhēafod (forehead), corresponding to fore- +‎ head. Cognate with
Scots foreheid (forehead),
Dutch voorhoofd (forehead), German Vorhaupt (forehead), Danish forhoved (brow; forehead; face). Compare also West Frisian foarholle (forehead), German Low German Vörkopp (forehead).

Alternative forms

  • for’ead, forrad, forread, forred, forrid (variable or uncertain spellings representing dialect or variant pronunciation)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfɔːhɛd/, /ˈfɔːɹɛd/, /ˈfɒɹɪd/, /ˈfɒɹɛd/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfɔɹɛd/, /ˈfɔɹɪd/, /ˈfɑɹɪd/, /ˈfɔɹˌhɛd/

Noun

forehead (countable and uncountable, plural foreheads)

  1. (countable) The part of the face above the eyebrows and below the hairline.
    • 1865, Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Macmillan
      ‘This question the Dodo could not answer without a great deal of thought, and it sat for a long time with one finger pressed upon its forehead (the position in which you usually see Shakespeare, in the pictures of him), while the rest waited in silence. At last the Dodo said, ‘everybody has won, and all must have prizes.’’
  2. (uncountable) confidence; audacity
  3. The upper part of a mobile phone, above the screen.

Synonyms

  • brow

Translations


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