browse vs graze what difference

what is difference between browse and graze

English

Etymology

Middle English browsen, from Old French brouster, broster (to nibble off buds, sprouts, and bark; browse), from brost (a sprout, shoot, bud), from a Germanic source, perhaps Frankish *brust (shoot, bud), from Proto-Germanic *brustiz (bud, shoot), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrews- (to swell, sprout). Cognate with Bavarian Bross, Brosst (a bud), Old Saxon brustian (to sprout). Doublet of brut, breast, and brush.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɹaʊz/
  • Homophone: brows
  • Rhymes: -aʊz

Verb

browse (third-person singular simple present browses, present participle browsing, simple past and past participle browsed)

  1. To scan, to casually look through in order to find items of interest, especially without knowledge of what to look for beforehand.
  2. To move about while sampling, such as with food or products on display.
  3. (transitive, computing) To navigate through hyperlinked documents on a computer, usually with a browser.
  4. (intransitive, of an animal) To move about while eating parts of plants, especially plants other than pasture, such as shrubs or trees.
    • 1997, Colorado State Forest Service
      Also, when planting to provide a source of browse for wintering deer and elk, protect seedlings from browsing during the first several years; an electric fence enclosure can offer effective protection.
  5. (archaic, transitive) To feed on, as pasture; to pasture on; to graze.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, The Gardener’s Daughter; or, The Pictures
      Fields [] browsed by deep-udder’d kine.

Derived terms

  • browser
  • browsable

Translations

Noun

browse (countable and uncountable, plural browses)

  1. (uncountable) Young shoots and twigs.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.10:
      And with their horned feet the greene gras wore, / The whiles their Gotes upon the brouzes fedd []
  2. (uncountable) Fodder for cattle and other animals.
    • 1997, Colorado State Forest Service
      Also, when planting to provide a source of browse for wintering deer and elk, protect seedlings from browsing during the first several years; an electric fence enclosure can offer effective protection.
    • 2007, Texas Parks and Wildlife Service
      In the Panhandle Area, bison eat browse that includes mesquite and elm.
  3. (countable) That which one browses through; something to read.
    • 1899, Rudyard Kipling, Stalky & Co.
      Here he buried himself in a close-printed, thickish volume which had been his chosen browse for some time.

Further reading

  • browse in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • browse in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Bowers, Bowser, bowers, bowres, bowser

Danish

Verb

browse (imperative brows, present browser, past browsede, past participle browset)

  1. (computing) to browse

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

browse

  1. first-person singular present indicative of browsen
  2. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of browsen
  3. imperative of browsen

German

Verb

browse

  1. inflection of browsen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative


English

Etymology

From Old English grasian (to feed on grass), from græs (grass).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹeɪz/
  • Homophones: grays, greys
  • Rhymes: -eɪz

Noun

graze (plural grazes)

  1. The act of grazing; a scratching or injuring lightly on passing.
  2. A light abrasion; a slight scratch.
  3. The act of animals feeding from pasture.
    • 1904, Empire Review (volume 6, page 188)
      If it be sundown, when the herds are returning from their daily graze in the long grass of the jungle, clouds of dust will be marking their track along every approach to the village []

Translations

Verb

graze (third-person singular simple present grazes, present participle grazing, simple past and past participle grazed)

  1. (transitive) To feed or supply (cattle, sheep, etc.) with grass; to furnish pasture for.
    • 1731, Jonathan Swift, Considerations upon Two Bills Relating to the Clergy
      a field or two to graze his cows
    • 1999: Although it is perfectly good meadowland, none of the villagers has ever grazed animals on the meadow on the other side of the wall. — Stardust, Neil Gaiman, page 4 (2001 Perennial Edition).
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To feed on; to eat (growing herbage); to eat grass from (a pasture)
    Cattle graze in the meadows.
    • 1993, John Montroll, Origami Inside-Out (page 41)
      The bird [Canada goose] is more often found on land than other waterfowl because of its love for seeds and grains. The long neck is well adapted for grazing.
  3. (transitive) To tend (cattle, etc.) while grazing.
    • 1596-98, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, act I, scene iii:
      Shylock: When Jacob grazed his uncle Laban’s sheep
  4. (intransitive) To eat periodically throughout the day, rather than at fixed mealtimes.
    • 2008, Mohgah Elsheikh, Caroline Murphy, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
      Furthermore, people who take the time to sit down to proper meals find their food more satisfying than people who graze throughout the day. If you skip meals, you will inevitably end up snacking on more high-fat high-sugar foods.
  5. To shoplift by consuming food or drink items before reaching the checkout.
    • 1992, Shoplifting (page 18)
      Grazing refers to customers who consume food items before paying for them, for example, a customer bags one and a half pounds of grapes in the produce department, eats some as she continues her shopping []
    • 2001, Labor Arbitration Information System (volume 2, page 59)
      Had the Grievant attempted to pay for the Mylanta or actually paid for it, then she would not be guilty of grazing or shoplifting.
  6. (transitive) To rub or touch lightly the surface of (a thing) in passing.
    the bullet grazed the wall
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 23
      But in that gale, the port, the land, is that ship’s direst jeopardy; she must fly all hospitality; one touch of land, though it but graze the keel, would make her shudder through and through.
  7. (transitive) To cause a slight wound to; to scratch.
    to graze one’s knee
  8. (intransitive) To yield grass for grazing.

Derived terms

  • Earth-grazing
  • grazing fire
  • overgraze

Translations

Anagrams

  • Garzê, Zager, gazer

Dutch

Verb

graze

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of grazen

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