browse vs surf what difference

what is difference between browse and surf

English

Etymology

Middle English browsen, from Old French brouster, broster (to nibble off buds, sprouts, and bark; browse), from brost (a sprout, shoot, bud), from a Germanic source, perhaps Frankish *brust (shoot, bud), from Proto-Germanic *brustiz (bud, shoot), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrews- (to swell, sprout). Cognate with Bavarian Bross, Brosst (a bud), Old Saxon brustian (to sprout). Doublet of brut, breast, and brush.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɹaʊz/
  • Homophone: brows
  • Rhymes: -aʊz

Verb

browse (third-person singular simple present browses, present participle browsing, simple past and past participle browsed)

  1. To scan, to casually look through in order to find items of interest, especially without knowledge of what to look for beforehand.
  2. To move about while sampling, such as with food or products on display.
  3. (transitive, computing) To navigate through hyperlinked documents on a computer, usually with a browser.
  4. (intransitive, of an animal) To move about while eating parts of plants, especially plants other than pasture, such as shrubs or trees.
    • 1997, Colorado State Forest Service
      Also, when planting to provide a source of browse for wintering deer and elk, protect seedlings from browsing during the first several years; an electric fence enclosure can offer effective protection.
  5. (archaic, transitive) To feed on, as pasture; to pasture on; to graze.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, The Gardener’s Daughter; or, The Pictures
      Fields [] browsed by deep-udder’d kine.

Derived terms

  • browser
  • browsable

Translations

Noun

browse (countable and uncountable, plural browses)

  1. (uncountable) Young shoots and twigs.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.10:
      And with their horned feet the greene gras wore, / The whiles their Gotes upon the brouzes fedd []
  2. (uncountable) Fodder for cattle and other animals.
    • 1997, Colorado State Forest Service
      Also, when planting to provide a source of browse for wintering deer and elk, protect seedlings from browsing during the first several years; an electric fence enclosure can offer effective protection.
    • 2007, Texas Parks and Wildlife Service
      In the Panhandle Area, bison eat browse that includes mesquite and elm.
  3. (countable) That which one browses through; something to read.
    • 1899, Rudyard Kipling, Stalky & Co.
      Here he buried himself in a close-printed, thickish volume which had been his chosen browse for some time.

Further reading

  • browse in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • browse in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Bowers, Bowser, bowers, bowres, bowser

Danish

Verb

browse (imperative brows, present browser, past browsede, past participle browset)

  1. (computing) to browse

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

browse

  1. first-person singular present indicative of browsen
  2. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of browsen
  3. imperative of browsen

German

Verb

browse

  1. inflection of browsen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /sɜːf/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /sɝf/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)f
  • Homophone: serf (in accents with the fern-fir-fur merger)

Etymology

1680s, perhaps from earlier suffe (c. 1590).
Unknown, possibly related to sough, or possibly of Indo-Aryan origin, as the word was formerly a reference to the coast of India.
The verb is from 1917.

Noun

surf (countable and uncountable, plural surfs)

  1. Waves that break on an ocean shoreline.
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      [] perhaps it was the look of the island, with its gray, melancholy woods, and wild stone spires, and the surf that we could both see and hear foaming and thundering on the steep beach []
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 5
      ‘But when the surf fell enough for the boats to get ashore, and Greening held a lantern for me to jump down into the passage, after we had got the side out of the tomb, the first thing the light fell on at the bottom was a white face turned skyward.
  2. An instance or session of riding a surfboard in the surf.
  3. (Britain, dialect) The bottom of a drain.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

surf (third-person singular simple present surfs, present participle surfing, simple past and past participle surfed)

  1. To ride a wave, usually on a surfboard.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To browse the Internet, television, etc.

Translations

Derived terms

  • surfer (noun)

Derived terms

  • (ride a wave): surfer, surfing, surfboard; crowdsurf, train-surf
  • (browse the Internet): channel-surf, counter surf, cybersurf, netsurf, silver surfer

Anagrams

  • Furs, furs

French

Noun

surf m (uncountable)

  1. surfing

Derived terms

  • surf des neiges

Related terms

  • surfer
  • surfeur
  • surfeuse

Italian

Etymology

From English surf.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsuɾf/, IPA(key): /səɾf/
  • Hyphenation: sùrf

Noun

surf m (invariable)

  1. (sports) surfing

Derived terms

  • surfista
  • surfare
  • tavola da surf
  • windsurf

Portuguese

Alternative forms

  • surfe (Brazilian)

Etymology

From English surf.

Noun

surf m (uncountable)

  1. (sports) surfing

Spanish

Etymology

From English surf.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsuɾf/, [ˈsuɾf]
  • IPA(key): /ˈsoɾf/, [ˈsoɾf]

Noun

surf m (uncountable)

  1. surfing

Derived terms


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