bruise vs contusion what difference

what is difference between bruise and contusion

English

Alternative forms

  • bruize (obsolete)
  • brise (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English bruisen, brusen, brosen, brisen, bresen, from a merger two words, both ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrews- (to break):

  • Old English brȳsan, brīesan (to bruise; crush), from Proto-Germanic *brausijaną, *brūsijaną (to break; crumble; crack). Provided the word’s sense.
  • Anglo-Norman bruiser, bruser (to break, smash, shatter), from Gaulish *brus-, from Proto-Celtic *bruseti (to break). Provided the word’s form.

Cognate with Scots brizz, German brausen (to roar; boom; pound), Old English brosnian (to crumble, fall apart), Dutch broos (brittle), German Brosame (crumb), dialectal Norwegian brøysk (breakable), Latin frustum (bit, scrap), Old Church Slavonic бръснути (brŭsnuti, to rake), Albanian breshër (hail).

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: bro͞oz, IPA(key): /bɹuːz/
  • Homophone: brews
  • Rhymes: -uːz

Verb

bruise (third-person singular simple present bruises, present participle bruising, simple past and past participle bruised)

  1. (transitive) To strike (a person), originally with something flat or heavy, but now specifically in such a way as to discolour the skin without breaking it.
  2. (transitive) To damage the skin of (fruit or vegetables), in an analogous way.
  3. (intransitive) Of fruit or vegetables, to gain bruises through being handled roughly.
    Bananas bruise easily.
  4. (intransitive) To become bruised.
    I bruise easily.
  5. (intransitive) To fight with the fists; to box.
    • Bruising was considered a fine, manly, old English custom.
  6. (transitive) To impair (gin) by shaking rather than stirring.

Derived terms

  • bruiser
  • bruising

Translations

Noun

bruise (plural bruises)

  1. A purplish mark on the skin due to leakage of blood from capillaries under the surface that have been damaged by a blow.
  2. A dark mark on fruit or vegetables caused by a blow to the surface.

Synonyms

  • (medical): ecchymosis, contusion (technical term)
  • See also Thesaurus:injury

Translations

Anagrams

  • Uribes, buries, busier, rubies

Dutch

Verb

bruise

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of bruisen

Irish

Noun

bruise f sg

  1. genitive singular of bruis (brush; pubic hair)

Mutation

References

  • “bruise” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.


English

Etymology

From Middle French contusion, from Latin contusionem, from contusus, past participle of contundere (to beat), from com- + tundere (to beat).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kənˈtjuːʒən/
  • (US) IPA(key): /kənˈtuʒən/
  • Rhymes: -uːʒən

Noun

contusion (countable and uncountable, plural contusions)

  1. A wound, such as a bruise, in which the skin is not broken, often having broken blood vessels and discolouration.
  2. The act of bruising.

Related terms

  • contuse

Translations

Anagrams

  • continuos

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin contūsiō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔ̃.ty.zjɔ̃/

Noun

contusion f (plural contusions)

  1. contusion, bruise

Related terms

  • contondant

Further reading

  • “contusion” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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