Bruise vs Welt what difference

what is difference between Bruise and Welt

English

Alternative forms

  • bruize (obsolete)
  • brise (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English bruisen, brusen, brosen, brisen, bresen, from a merger two words, both ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrews- (to break):

  • Old English brȳsan, brīesan (to bruise; crush), from Proto-Germanic *brausijaną, *brūsijaną (to break; crumble; crack). Provided the word’s sense.
  • Anglo-Norman bruiser, bruser (to break, smash, shatter), from Gaulish *brus-, from Proto-Celtic *bruseti (to break). Provided the word’s form.

Cognate with Scots brizz, German brausen (to roar; boom; pound), Old English brosnian (to crumble, fall apart), Dutch broos (brittle), German Brosame (crumb), dialectal Norwegian brøysk (breakable), Latin frustum (bit, scrap), Old Church Slavonic бръснути (brŭsnuti, to rake), Albanian breshër (hail).

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: bro͞oz, IPA(key): /bɹuːz/
  • Homophone: brews
  • Rhymes: -uːz

Verb

bruise (third-person singular simple present bruises, present participle bruising, simple past and past participle bruised)

  1. (transitive) To strike (a person), originally with something flat or heavy, but now specifically in such a way as to discolour the skin without breaking it.
  2. (transitive) To damage the skin of (fruit or vegetables), in an analogous way.
  3. (intransitive) Of fruit or vegetables, to gain bruises through being handled roughly.
    Bananas bruise easily.
  4. (intransitive) To become bruised.
    I bruise easily.
  5. (intransitive) To fight with the fists; to box.
    • Bruising was considered a fine, manly, old English custom.
  6. (transitive) To impair (gin) by shaking rather than stirring.

Derived terms

  • bruiser
  • bruising

Translations

Noun

bruise (plural bruises)

  1. A purplish mark on the skin due to leakage of blood from capillaries under the surface that have been damaged by a blow.
  2. A dark mark on fruit or vegetables caused by a blow to the surface.

Synonyms

  • (medical): ecchymosis, contusion (technical term)
  • See also Thesaurus:injury

Translations

Anagrams

  • Uribes, buries, busier, rubies

Dutch

Verb

bruise

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of bruisen

Irish

Noun

bruise f sg

  1. genitive singular of bruis (brush; pubic hair)

Mutation

References

  • “bruise” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wɛlt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛlt

Etymology 1

From Middle English welten, from Old English weltan, wieltan, from Proto-Germanic *waltijaną, from Proto-Indo-European *wel- (to turn; wind; twist). Cognate with German wälzen, Danish vælte, Swedish välta, Icelandic velta.

Verb

welt (third-person singular simple present welts, present participle welting, simple past and past participle welted)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To roll; revolve
Derived terms
  • welter

Etymology 2

Circa 1425, a shoemaker’s term. Perhaps related to Middle English welten (to overturn, roll over), from Old Norse velta (to roll). Meaning “ridge on the skin from a wound” first recorded 1800.

Noun

welt (plural welts)

  1. A ridge or lump on the skin, as caused by a blow; a wheal or weal.
  2. (shoemaking) A strip of leather set into the seam between the outsole of a shoe and the upper, through which these parts are joined by stitching or stapling.
  3. A strip of material or covered cord applied to a seam or garment edge to strengthen or cover it.
  4. In steam boilers and sheet-iron work, a strip riveted upon the edges of plates that form a butt joint.
  5. In carpentry, a strip of wood fastened over a flush seam or joint, or an angle, to strengthen it.
  6. In machine-made stockings, a strip, or flap, of which the heel is formed.
  7. (heraldry) A narrow border, as of an ordinary, but not extending around the ends.
  8. A feature resembling a welt.
Translations

Verb

welt (third-person singular simple present welts, present participle welting, simple past and past participle welted)

  1. To cause to have welts, to beat.
  2. To install welt (a welt or welts) to reinforce.
Translations

Etymology 3

Verb

welt (third-person singular simple present welts, present participle welting, simple past and past participle welted)

  1. (Britain, dialect, archaic, intransitive) To decay.
  2. (Britain, dialect, archaic, intransitive) To become stringy.
Related terms
  • wilt

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɛlt

Verb

welt

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of wellen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of wellen

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