bruit vs rumor what difference

what is difference between bruit and rumor

English

Etymology 1

The noun is derived from Middle English bruit (commotion, tumult; fame, renown; collective noun for a group of barons) [and other forms], from Anglo-Norman brut (commotion, tumult; noise, sounds; fame, renown; hearsay, rumour; collective noun for a group of barons) and Old French bruit (commotion, tumult; noise, sounds; fame, renown; hearsay, rumour) (modern French bruit (noise; report, rumour)), a noun use of the past participle of bruire (to make a noise; to rattle; to roar; to rustle), from Late Latin brugere, an alteration of Latin rugīre (to roar) (the present active infinitive of rugiō (to bray; to bellow, roar; to rumble), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rewg- (to belch; to roar)), possibly influenced by Late Latin bragere (to bray). The English word is cognate with Catalan brogir (to roar); Old Occitan bruir, brugir (to roar).

The verb is derived from the noun.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: bro͞ot, IPA(key): /bɹuːt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /bɹut/
  • Rhymes: -uːt
  • Homophone: brute

Noun

bruit (countable and uncountable, plural bruits)

  1. (uncountable, archaic) Hearsay, rumour; talk; (countable) an instance of this.
  2. (countable, obsolete) A clamour, an outcry; a noise.

Verb

bruit (third-person singular simple present bruits, present participle bruiting, simple past and past participle bruited)

  1. (transitive, archaic in Britain, current in the US) To disseminate, promulgate, or spread news, a rumour, etc.
Conjugation
Derived terms
  • bruiter (archaic)
Translations

Etymology 2

Borrowed from French bruit (noise; report, rumour), from Old French bruit (noise; sounds); see further at etymology 1.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɹuːi/, /bɹuːˈiː/, /bɹuːt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈbɹui/, /bɹuˈi/, /bɹut/
  • Hyphenation: bru‧it; not hyphenated if pronounced as a single syllable

Noun

bruit (plural bruits)

  1. (medicine) An abnormal sound in the body heard on auscultation (for example, through using a stethoscope); a murmur. [from 19th c.]
Translations

References

Further reading

  • bruit on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

French

Etymology

From Old French bruit, used as a noun of the past participle form of bruire (to roar), from a Proto-Romance alteration (by association with braire (to bray; to cry out, shout out)) of Latin rugītus (brayed; bellowed, roared; rumbled) (compare Vulgar Latin *brugitus, from Latin *brūgere). Compare also Spanish ruido, Portuguese ruído, and French rut.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʁɥi/

Noun

bruit m (plural bruits)

  1. a noise
    Synonym: (Louisiana) hélas
  2. a rumor or report

Derived terms

  • à bas bruit
  • bruit de couloir
  • bruitage
  • bruiteur
  • faire du bruit
  • faire grand bruit

Descendants

  • English: bruit

Further reading

  • “bruit” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • tribu

Old French

Etymology

From the past participle of bruire (to roar), or from Vulgar Latin *brūgitus, from Latin *brūgere, an alteration of Latin rugītus (brayed; bellowed, roared; rumbled), from rugīre, the present active infinitive of rugiō (to bray; to bellow, roar; to rumble), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rewg- (to belch; to roar).

Noun

bruit m (oblique plural bruiz or bruitz, nominative singular bruiz or bruitz, nominative plural bruit)

  1. noise; sounds
    Synonym: noise

Descendants

  • English: bruit
  • French: bruit


English

Alternative forms

  • rumour (Commonwealth)

Etymology

From Middle English rumour, from Old French rumeur, from Latin rūmor (common talk).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɹuːmə(ɹ)/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɹumɚ/
  • Rhymes: -uːmə(r)

Noun

rumor (countable and uncountable, plural rumors)

  1. (American spelling, countable) A statement or claim of questionable accuracy, from no known reliable source, usually spread by word of mouth.
    There’s a rumor going round that he’s going to get married.
  2. (American spelling, uncountable) Information or misinformation of the kind contained in such claims.
    They say he used to be a thief, but that’s just rumor.

Synonyms

  • (piece of information):
  • (information): gossip, hearsay, talk, tittle-tattle

Hypernyms

  • information

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

rumor (third-person singular simple present rumors, present participle rumoring, simple past and past participle rumored)

  1. (transitive, usually used in the passive voice) To tell a rumor about; to gossip.
    John is rumored to be next in line for a promotion.

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin rumor, rumorem.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ruˈmo/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ruˈmoɾ/

Noun

rumor m (plural rumors)

  1. rumor

Related terms

  • rumorejar

Further reading

  • “rumor” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *roumōs, from Proto-Indo-European *rewH- (to shout, to roar).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈruː.mor/, [ˈɾuːmɔɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈru.mor/, [ˈruːmɔr]

Noun

rūmor m (genitive rūmōris); third declension

  1. rumor, hearsay
  2. rustle, murmur, a murmuring
  3. The voice of the people

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Descendants

References

  • rumor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • rumor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • rumor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • rumor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

Polish

Etymology

From Latin rūmor.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈru.mɔr/

Noun

rumor m inan

  1. uproar, hubbub, tumult, racket, din
    Synonyms: wrzawa, zamieszanie

Declension

Further reading

  • rumor in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • rumor in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin rumor, rumorem.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ʁuˈmo(ʁ)/
  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ʁuˈmoɾ/
  • Hyphenation: ru‧mor

Noun

rumor m (plural rumores)

  1. rumour (statement or claim from no known reliable source)
  2. continuous noise
    • No confuso rumor que se formava, destacavam-se risos, sons de vozes que altercavam, sem se saber de onde, grasnar de marrecos, cantar de galos, cacarejar de galinhas.

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:rumor.


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin rumor, rumorem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ruˈmoɾ/, [ruˈmoɾ]
  • Hyphenation: ru‧mor

Noun

rumor m (plural rumores)

  1. rumor
  2. murmur

Related terms

  • rumorear

Further reading

  • “rumor” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

References


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