buffer vs cowcatcher what difference

what is difference between buffer and cowcatcher

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbʌfə(ɹ)/, [ˈbɐfə(ɹ)]
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈbʌfɚ/
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /ˈbafə(ɹ)/, [ˈbäfə(ɹ)]
  • Rhymes: -ʌfə(r)

Etymology 1

Noun

buffer (plural buffers)

  1. Someone or something that buffs (polishes and makes shiny).
    1. A machine with rotary brushes, passed over a hard floor to clean it.
    2. A machine for polishing shoes and boots.
Related terms
  • buffer lass
  • buffer rodeo
Translations

Adjective

buffer

  1. Comparative form of buff: more buff.

Etymology 2

Agent noun from obsolete verb buff (make a dull sound when struck) (mid-16c.), from Old French buffe (blow).

The “bosun’s mate” sense is said to be popularly explained by the mate being a “buffer”, that is intermediary, between officers and men, but various other explanations have also been proposed.

Noun

buffer (plural buffers)

  1. (chemistry) A solution used to stabilize the pH (acidity) of a liquid.
  2. (computing) A portion of memory set aside to store data, often before it is sent to an external device or as it is received from an external device.
  3. Anything used to isolate or minimize the effect of one thing on another.
    1. (mechanical) Anything used to maintain slack or isolate different objects.
    2. (telecommunications) A routine or storage medium used to compensate for a difference in rate of flow of data, or time of occurrence of events, when transferring data from one device to another.
    3. (rail transport) A device on trains and carriages designed to cushion the impact between them.
      • 1885, W. S. Gilbert, The Mikado, Act II, in The Mikado, and Other Plays, New York: Modern Library, 1917, p. 42, [2]
        The idiot who, in railway carriages, / Scribbles on window panes, / We only suffer / To ride on a buffer / In Parliamentary trains.
      • 1953, C. S. Lewis, The Silver Chair, Collins, 1998, Chapter 14,
        Then, with a shock like a thousand goods trains crashing into a thousand pairs of buffers, the lips of rock closed.
    4. (rail transport) The metal barrier to help prevent trains from running off the end of the track.
    5. An isolating circuit, often an amplifier, used to minimize the influence of a driven circuit on the driving circuit.
    6. (politics, international relations) A buffer zone (such as a demilitarized zone) or a buffer state.
    7. (figuratively) A gap that isolates or separates two things.
  4. (Britain, nautical, slang) The chief bosun’s mate.
    • 2001, Mark Higgitt, Through Fire and Water (page 43)
      He decided to run for president of the POs’ Mess against the Buffer, Chief Bosun’s Mate Mal Crane, but the two had a face-to-face in his cabin one night in Narvik and sorted it out.
    • 2015, Peter Broadbent, A Singapore Fling: An AB’s Far-Flung Adventure
      I happen to be on the brow handing my Bosun’s Mate duties over to an Ordinary Seaman when the Buffer arrives with an unofficial Side-Party to man the brow with Bosun’s Calls at the ready.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

buffer (third-person singular simple present buffers, present participle buffering, simple past and past participle buffered)

  1. To use a buffer or buffers; to isolate or minimize the effects of one thing on another.
  2. (computing) To store data in memory temporarily.
  3. (chemistry) To maintain the acidity of a solution near a chosen value by adding an acid or a base.
Related terms
  • bufferize
  • buffer up
  • buffer zone
Translations

Etymology 3

Noun

buffer (plural buffers)

  1. (colloquial) A good-humoured, slow-witted fellow, usually an elderly man.
    • 1955, C. S. Lewis, The Magician’s Nephew, Collins, 1998, Chapter 1,
      I can’t expect two youngsters like you to find it much fun talking to an old buffer like me.

Anagrams

  • rebuff

References


Danish

Etymology

From English buffer.

Noun

buffer c (singular definite bufferen, plural indefinite buffere)

  1. (chemistry) buffer

Declension

Synonyms

  • puffer

Further reading

  • “buffer” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English buffer.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʏ.fər/
  • Hyphenation: buf‧fer
  • Rhymes: -ʏfər

Noun

buffer m (plural buffers, diminutive buffertje n)

  1. A buffer for storage.
  2. A buffer, margin for safety.
  3. (rail transport) A buffer (device on trains and carriages designed to cushion the impact between them).

Derived terms

  • bufferen
  • buffergeheugen
  • bufferstaat
  • buffervoorraad
  • bufferzone
  • geheugenbuffer

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English buffer.

Noun

buffer m (invariable)

  1. (computing) buffer
    Synonym: memoria tampone


Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English buffer.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈbɐ.feʁ/

Noun

buffer m (plural buffers)

  1. (computing) buffer (memory for temporary storage)

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) buffar
  • (Sutsilvan) bufar
  • (Vallader) boffar

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb

buffer

  1. (Puter) to blow

Synonyms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) sufflar
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) zuflar
  • (Puter) zufler
  • (Vallader) sofflar

Spanish

Noun

buffer m (plural buffers)

  1. (computing) buffer

Westrobothnian

Verb

buffer

  1. Alternative form of bufför


English

Etymology

cow +‎ catcher

Noun

cowcatcher (plural cowcatchers)

  1. (rail transport, principally US) The V-shaped device on the front of a locomotive (or other large vehicle) shaped so as to push objects on the tracks out of the way, to prevent major damage to the train.
    Synonym: pilot
  2. (radio, advertising) An advertisement at the start of a programme.
    Coordinate term: hitchhiker
    • 1945, Broadcasting (volume 29, page 55)
      Hitchhiker and cowcatcher plugs will be considered.
    • 1945, Charles Harold Sandage, Radio Advertising for Retailers (page 185)
      National advertisers have probably been major contributors to this practice through the use of so-called hitchhike and cowcatcher announcements.
    • 2009, George Ansbro, I Have a Lady in the Balcony (page 138)
      Sometime in the mid-40s, the Hummerts canceled Mr. Keen and Easy Aces from their early evening periods on CBS, which also killed my cowcatchers and hitchhikes.

References

  • 1951, Eugene Fred Seehafer, Jack William Laemmar, Successful radio and television advertising (page 207): “A cowcatcher announcement is one aired at the very beginning of a radio program, as soon as the broadcast goes on the air and the program has been introduced to listeners.”

See also

  • fender
  • lifeguard
  • snowplough

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