buffer vs fender what difference

what is difference between buffer and fender

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbʌfə(ɹ)/, [ˈbɐfə(ɹ)]
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈbʌfɚ/
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /ˈbafə(ɹ)/, [ˈbäfə(ɹ)]
  • Rhymes: -ʌfə(r)

Etymology 1

Noun

buffer (plural buffers)

  1. Someone or something that buffs (polishes and makes shiny).
    1. A machine with rotary brushes, passed over a hard floor to clean it.
    2. A machine for polishing shoes and boots.
Related terms
  • buffer lass
  • buffer rodeo
Translations

Adjective

buffer

  1. Comparative form of buff: more buff.

Etymology 2

Agent noun from obsolete verb buff (make a dull sound when struck) (mid-16c.), from Old French buffe (blow).

The “bosun’s mate” sense is said to be popularly explained by the mate being a “buffer”, that is intermediary, between officers and men, but various other explanations have also been proposed.

Noun

buffer (plural buffers)

  1. (chemistry) A solution used to stabilize the pH (acidity) of a liquid.
  2. (computing) A portion of memory set aside to store data, often before it is sent to an external device or as it is received from an external device.
  3. Anything used to isolate or minimize the effect of one thing on another.
    1. (mechanical) Anything used to maintain slack or isolate different objects.
    2. (telecommunications) A routine or storage medium used to compensate for a difference in rate of flow of data, or time of occurrence of events, when transferring data from one device to another.
    3. (rail transport) A device on trains and carriages designed to cushion the impact between them.
      • 1885, W. S. Gilbert, The Mikado, Act II, in The Mikado, and Other Plays, New York: Modern Library, 1917, p. 42, [2]
        The idiot who, in railway carriages, / Scribbles on window panes, / We only suffer / To ride on a buffer / In Parliamentary trains.
      • 1953, C. S. Lewis, The Silver Chair, Collins, 1998, Chapter 14,
        Then, with a shock like a thousand goods trains crashing into a thousand pairs of buffers, the lips of rock closed.
    4. (rail transport) The metal barrier to help prevent trains from running off the end of the track.
    5. An isolating circuit, often an amplifier, used to minimize the influence of a driven circuit on the driving circuit.
    6. (politics, international relations) A buffer zone (such as a demilitarized zone) or a buffer state.
    7. (figuratively) A gap that isolates or separates two things.
  4. (Britain, nautical, slang) The chief bosun’s mate.
    • 2001, Mark Higgitt, Through Fire and Water (page 43)
      He decided to run for president of the POs’ Mess against the Buffer, Chief Bosun’s Mate Mal Crane, but the two had a face-to-face in his cabin one night in Narvik and sorted it out.
    • 2015, Peter Broadbent, A Singapore Fling: An AB’s Far-Flung Adventure
      I happen to be on the brow handing my Bosun’s Mate duties over to an Ordinary Seaman when the Buffer arrives with an unofficial Side-Party to man the brow with Bosun’s Calls at the ready.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

buffer (third-person singular simple present buffers, present participle buffering, simple past and past participle buffered)

  1. To use a buffer or buffers; to isolate or minimize the effects of one thing on another.
  2. (computing) To store data in memory temporarily.
  3. (chemistry) To maintain the acidity of a solution near a chosen value by adding an acid or a base.
Related terms
  • bufferize
  • buffer up
  • buffer zone
Translations

Etymology 3

Noun

buffer (plural buffers)

  1. (colloquial) A good-humoured, slow-witted fellow, usually an elderly man.
    • 1955, C. S. Lewis, The Magician’s Nephew, Collins, 1998, Chapter 1,
      I can’t expect two youngsters like you to find it much fun talking to an old buffer like me.

Anagrams

  • rebuff

References


Danish

Etymology

From English buffer.

Noun

buffer c (singular definite bufferen, plural indefinite buffere)

  1. (chemistry) buffer

Declension

Synonyms

  • puffer

Further reading

  • “buffer” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English buffer.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʏ.fər/
  • Hyphenation: buf‧fer
  • Rhymes: -ʏfər

Noun

buffer m (plural buffers, diminutive buffertje n)

  1. A buffer for storage.
  2. A buffer, margin for safety.
  3. (rail transport) A buffer (device on trains and carriages designed to cushion the impact between them).

Derived terms

  • bufferen
  • buffergeheugen
  • bufferstaat
  • buffervoorraad
  • bufferzone
  • geheugenbuffer

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English buffer.

Noun

buffer m (invariable)

  1. (computing) buffer
    Synonym: memoria tampone


Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English buffer.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈbɐ.feʁ/

Noun

buffer m (plural buffers)

  1. (computing) buffer (memory for temporary storage)

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) buffar
  • (Sutsilvan) bufar
  • (Vallader) boffar

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb

buffer

  1. (Puter) to blow

Synonyms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) sufflar
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) zuflar
  • (Puter) zufler
  • (Vallader) sofflar

Spanish

Noun

buffer m (plural buffers)

  1. (computing) buffer

Westrobothnian

Verb

buffer

  1. Alternative form of bufför


English

Etymology

fend +‎ -er

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfɛnd.ə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -ɛndə(r)

Noun

fender (plural fenders)

  1. (US) panel of a car which encloses the wheel area, especially the front wheels
    Synonyms: (Australian) guard, (British) [Term?], (British) wheel arch, [Term?], wing
  2. (US) a shield, usually of plastic or metal, on a bicycle that protects the rider from mud or water
    Synonym: (British) mudguard
  3. (nautical) any shaped cushion-like object normally made from polymers, rubber or wood that is placed along the sides of a boat to prevent damage when moored alongside another vessel or jetty, or when using a lock, etc. Modern variations are cylindrical although older wooden version and rubbing strips can still be found; old tyres are used as a cheap substitute
  4. a low metal framework in front of a fireplace, intended to catch hot coals, soot, and ash
    • 1907, E.M. Forster, The Longest Journey, Part I, I [Uniform ed., p. 12]:

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

fender (third-person singular simple present fenders, present participle fendering, simple past and past participle fendered)

  1. (nautical) To use fenders to protect the side of a boat

Gallery

Anagrams

  • ferned, nerfed

Asturian

Verb

fender

  1. to split; to shatter
  2. to open up
  3. to chill; to send a chill down someone’s spine

Galician

Etymology

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese fender (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from Latin findere, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split). Cognate with Portuguese fender and Spanish hendir.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fenˈdeɾ/

Verb

fender (first-person singular present fendo, first-person singular preterite fendín, past participle fendido)

  1. to split, cleave, rip
    • 1370, Ramón Lorenzo (ed.), Crónica troiana. A Coruña: Fundación Barrié, page 426:
      Et tal colpe lle deu per meo do escudo que logo llo fendeu de çima ata fondo

      And he so hardly stroke his [enemy’s] shield by the middle that at the moment he split it, from top to bottom
    • 1409, J. L. Pensado Tomé (ed.), Tratado de Albeitaria. Santiago de Compostela: Centro Ramón Piñeiro, page 89:
      Quando as ditas llandoas creçeren asy como Nozes, ou mais ou menos, traua dellas llogo et apretaas et fendeas ao llongo con canyuete agudo

      when these growths become big as nuts, give or take, grab them readily and squeeze them and cut them open lengthwise with a sharp knife
  2. to crack
  3. to separate
  4. to break through

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • fenda

References

  • “fender” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI – ILGA 2006-2012.
  • “fender” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez – Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • “fender” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI – ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “fender” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • “fender” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From English fender

Noun

fender m (definite singular fenderen, indefinite plural fendere or fendre or fendrer, definite plural fenderne or fendrene)

  1. (nautical) a fender

References

  • “fender” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English fender

Noun

fender m (definite singular fenderen, indefinite plural fenderar, definite plural fenderane)

  1. (nautical) a fender

References

  • “fender” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin findere, present active infinitive of findō, from Proto-Italic *findō, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split).

Verb

fender (first-person singular present indicative fendo, past participle fendido)

  1. to split, cleave, rip
  2. to crack
  3. to separate
  4. first-person singular (eu) personal infinitive of fender
  5. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) personal infinitive of fender
  6. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of fender
  7. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of fender

Conjugation

Related terms

  • fenda

Vilamovian

Pronunciation

Noun

fender m

  1. forester

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