buffer vs pilot what difference

what is difference between buffer and pilot

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbʌfə(ɹ)/, [ˈbɐfə(ɹ)]
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈbʌfɚ/
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /ˈbafə(ɹ)/, [ˈbäfə(ɹ)]
  • Rhymes: -ʌfə(r)

Etymology 1

Noun

buffer (plural buffers)

  1. Someone or something that buffs (polishes and makes shiny).
    1. A machine with rotary brushes, passed over a hard floor to clean it.
    2. A machine for polishing shoes and boots.
Related terms
  • buffer lass
  • buffer rodeo
Translations

Adjective

buffer

  1. Comparative form of buff: more buff.

Etymology 2

Agent noun from obsolete verb buff (make a dull sound when struck) (mid-16c.), from Old French buffe (blow).

The “bosun’s mate” sense is said to be popularly explained by the mate being a “buffer”, that is intermediary, between officers and men, but various other explanations have also been proposed.

Noun

buffer (plural buffers)

  1. (chemistry) A solution used to stabilize the pH (acidity) of a liquid.
  2. (computing) A portion of memory set aside to store data, often before it is sent to an external device or as it is received from an external device.
  3. Anything used to isolate or minimize the effect of one thing on another.
    1. (mechanical) Anything used to maintain slack or isolate different objects.
    2. (telecommunications) A routine or storage medium used to compensate for a difference in rate of flow of data, or time of occurrence of events, when transferring data from one device to another.
    3. (rail transport) A device on trains and carriages designed to cushion the impact between them.
      • 1885, W. S. Gilbert, The Mikado, Act II, in The Mikado, and Other Plays, New York: Modern Library, 1917, p. 42, [2]
        The idiot who, in railway carriages, / Scribbles on window panes, / We only suffer / To ride on a buffer / In Parliamentary trains.
      • 1953, C. S. Lewis, The Silver Chair, Collins, 1998, Chapter 14,
        Then, with a shock like a thousand goods trains crashing into a thousand pairs of buffers, the lips of rock closed.
    4. (rail transport) The metal barrier to help prevent trains from running off the end of the track.
    5. An isolating circuit, often an amplifier, used to minimize the influence of a driven circuit on the driving circuit.
    6. (politics, international relations) A buffer zone (such as a demilitarized zone) or a buffer state.
    7. (figuratively) A gap that isolates or separates two things.
  4. (Britain, nautical, slang) The chief bosun’s mate.
    • 2001, Mark Higgitt, Through Fire and Water (page 43)
      He decided to run for president of the POs’ Mess against the Buffer, Chief Bosun’s Mate Mal Crane, but the two had a face-to-face in his cabin one night in Narvik and sorted it out.
    • 2015, Peter Broadbent, A Singapore Fling: An AB’s Far-Flung Adventure
      I happen to be on the brow handing my Bosun’s Mate duties over to an Ordinary Seaman when the Buffer arrives with an unofficial Side-Party to man the brow with Bosun’s Calls at the ready.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

buffer (third-person singular simple present buffers, present participle buffering, simple past and past participle buffered)

  1. To use a buffer or buffers; to isolate or minimize the effects of one thing on another.
  2. (computing) To store data in memory temporarily.
  3. (chemistry) To maintain the acidity of a solution near a chosen value by adding an acid or a base.
Related terms
  • bufferize
  • buffer up
  • buffer zone
Translations

Etymology 3

Noun

buffer (plural buffers)

  1. (colloquial) A good-humoured, slow-witted fellow, usually an elderly man.
    • 1955, C. S. Lewis, The Magician’s Nephew, Collins, 1998, Chapter 1,
      I can’t expect two youngsters like you to find it much fun talking to an old buffer like me.

Anagrams

  • rebuff

References


Danish

Etymology

From English buffer.

Noun

buffer c (singular definite bufferen, plural indefinite buffere)

  1. (chemistry) buffer

Declension

Synonyms

  • puffer

Further reading

  • “buffer” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English buffer.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʏ.fər/
  • Hyphenation: buf‧fer
  • Rhymes: -ʏfər

Noun

buffer m (plural buffers, diminutive buffertje n)

  1. A buffer for storage.
  2. A buffer, margin for safety.
  3. (rail transport) A buffer (device on trains and carriages designed to cushion the impact between them).

Derived terms

  • bufferen
  • buffergeheugen
  • bufferstaat
  • buffervoorraad
  • bufferzone
  • geheugenbuffer

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English buffer.

Noun

buffer m (invariable)

  1. (computing) buffer
    Synonym: memoria tampone


Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English buffer.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈbɐ.feʁ/

Noun

buffer m (plural buffers)

  1. (computing) buffer (memory for temporary storage)

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) buffar
  • (Sutsilvan) bufar
  • (Vallader) boffar

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb

buffer

  1. (Puter) to blow

Synonyms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) sufflar
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) zuflar
  • (Puter) zufler
  • (Vallader) sofflar

Spanish

Noun

buffer m (plural buffers)

  1. (computing) buffer

Westrobothnian

Verb

buffer

  1. Alternative form of bufför


English

Etymology

From Middle French pilot, pillot, from Italian pilota, piloto, older also pedotta, pedot(t)o (the form in pil- is probably influenced by pileggiare (to sail, navigate)); ultimately from unattested Byzantine Greek *πηδώτης (*pēdṓtēs, helmsman), from Ancient Greek πηδόν (pēdón, blade of an oar, oar), hence also Ancient and Modern Greek πηδάλιον (pēdálion, rudder).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpaɪlət/
  • Rhymes: -aɪlət
  • Homophone: Pilate

Noun

pilot (plural pilots)

  1. A person who steers a ship, a helmsman.
    • 1697, John Dryden, The Works of Virgil, The Aeneid Book One
      They scud before the wind, and sail in open sea.
      Ahead of all the master pilot steers;
      And, as he leads, the following navy veers.
  2. A person who knows well the depths and currents of a harbor or coastal area, who is hired by a vessel to help navigate the harbor or coast.
  3. A guide book for maritime navigation.
  4. An instrument for detecting the compass error.
  5. (Australia, road transport, informal) A pilot vehicle.
  6. (Australia, road transport) A person authorised to drive such a vehicle during an escort.
  7. A guide or escort through an unknown or dangerous area.
    • 1834, David Crockett, A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett, E. L. Cary and A. Hart, page 43:
      So we mounted our horses, and put out for that town, under the direction of two friendly Creeks we had taken for pilots.
  8. Something serving as a test or trial.
    1. (mining) The heading or excavation of relatively small dimensions, first made in the driving of a larger tunnel.
  9. (aviation) A person who is in charge of the controls of an aircraft.
  10. (television) A sample episode of a proposed TV series produced to decide if it should be made or not. If approved, typically the first episode of an actual TV series.
  11. (rail transport) A cowcatcher.
  12. A pilot light.
  13. One who flies a kite.
  14. A short plug, sometimes made interchangeable, at the end of a counterbore to guide the tool.

Derived terms

Translations

Adjective

pilot (not comparable)

  1. Made or used as a test or demonstration of capability.
    a pilot run of the new factory
    The pilot plant showed the need for major process changes.
  2. Used to control or activate another device.
    a pilot light
  3. Being a vehicle to warn other road users of the presence of an oversize vehicle/combination.
    a pilot vehicle

Translations

Verb

pilot (third-person singular simple present pilots, present participle piloting, simple past and past participle piloted)

  1. (transitive) To control (an aircraft or watercraft).
  2. (transitive) To guide (a vessel) through coastal waters.
  3. (transitive) To test or have a preliminary trial of (an idea, a new product, etc.)
  4. (rail transport, of a locomotive) To serve as the leading locomotive on a double-headed train.

Translations

References

  • pilot at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • pilot in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • potli, ptilo-, topil

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /piˈlɔt/
  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Adjective

pilot (feminine pilota, masculine plural pilots, feminine plural pilotes)

  1. pilot

Noun

pilot m (plural pilots)

  1. pilot
  2. driver
  3. light, warning light

Derived terms

  • copilot

Further reading

  • “pilot” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “pilot” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “pilot” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “pilot” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Czech

Noun

pilot m

  1. pilot (controller of aircraft)

Declension

Derived terms

  • pilotní
  • pilotovat

Further reading

  • pilot in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • pilot in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Noun

pilot c (singular definite piloten, plural indefinite piloter)

  1. pilot

Declension

References

  • “pilot” in Den Danske Ordbog

Latvian

Noun

pilot

  1. vocative singular form of pilots

Verb

pilot

  1. present conjunctive form of pilēt
  2. (with the particle lai) imperative conjunctive form of pilēt

Participle

pilot (invariable)

  1. adverbial present active participle of pilēt (invariable form)

Middle French

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

pilot m (plural pilots)

  1. stake (pole designed to be pushed into the ground)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From French pilote

Noun

pilot m (definite singular piloten, indefinite plural piloter, definite plural pilotene)

  1. pilot (controller of an aircraft)

Synonyms

  • flyger

Derived terms

  • autopilot
  • pilotprosjekt

References

  • “pilot” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From French pilote

Noun

pilot m (definite singular piloten, indefinite plural pilotar, definite plural pilotane)

  1. pilot (controller of an aircraft)

Derived terms

  • autopilot
  • pilotprosjekt

References

  • “pilot” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpʲi.lɔt/

Noun

pilot m pers

  1. pilot (controller of aircraft)

Declension

Noun

pilot m inan

  1. remote control

Declension


Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French pilote.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /piˈlot/

Noun

pilot m (plural piloți)

  1. pilot

Declension

Related terms

  • aeroport
  • avion
  • a pilota

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