buffet vs counter what difference

what is difference between buffet and counter

English

Etymology 1

From French buffet.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: bo͝o’fā, bŭ’fā; IPA(key): /ˈbʊfeɪ/, /ˈbʌfeɪ/
  • (US) enPR: bəfā’, IPA(key): /bəˈfeɪ/

Noun

buffet (plural buffets)

  1. A counter or sideboard from which food and drinks are served or may be bought.
    Synonyms: sideboard, smorgasbord, (obsolete) cupboard
  2. Food laid out in this way, to which diners serve themselves.
    Synonyms: buffet meal, smorgasbord
  3. A small stool; a stool for a buffet or counter.
    • c. 15th century, author unknown, Wakefield Mystery Plays
      Go fetche us a light buffet.
Descendants
  • Japanese: ビュッフェ (byuffe)
  • Korean: 뷔페 (bwipe)
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English buffet, from Old French buffet, diminutive of buffe, cognate with Italian buffetto. See buffer, buffoon, and compare German puffen (to jostle, to hustle).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bŭfʹĭt, IPA(key): /ˈbʌfɪt/

Noun

buffet (plural buffets)

  1. A blow or cuff with or as if with the hand, or by any other solid object or the wind.
    Synonyms: blow, (by any solid object) collision, (with the hand) cuff
    • October 30, 1795, Edmund Burke, letter to Lord Auckland
      those planks of tough and hardy oak that used for years to brave the buffets of the Bay of Biscay

Etymology 3

From Middle English buffeten, from Old French buffeter, from the noun (see above).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bŭfʹĭt, IPA(key): /ˈbʌfɪt/

Verb

buffet (third-person singular simple present buffets, present participle buffeting or buffetting, simple past and past participle buffeted or buffetted)

  1. (transitive) To strike with a buffet; to cuff; to slap.
    • They spit in his face and buffeted him.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) to aggressively challenge, denounce, or criticise.
    • 2013 May 23, Sarah Lyall, “British Leader’s Liberal Turn Sets Off a Rebellion in His Party,” New York Times (retrieved 29 May 2013):
      Buffeted by criticism of his policy on Europe, battered by rebellion in the ranks over his bill to legalize same-sex marriage and wounded by the perception that he is supercilious, contemptuous and out of touch with mainstream Conservatism, Mr. Cameron earlier this week took the highly unusual step of sending a mass e-mail (or, as he called it, “a personal note”) to his party’s grass-roots members.
  3. To affect as with blows; to strike repeatedly; to strive with or contend against.
    to buffet the billows
    • 1726, William Broome, epistle to Elijah Fenton
      The sudden hurricane in thunder roars, / Buffets the bark, and whirls it from the shores.
    • 1830, Joseph Plumb Martin, A Narrative of Some of the Adventures, Dangers and Sufferings of a Revolutionary Soldier, Ch. I:
      […] I buffetted heat and mosquetoes, and got the hay all up […]
  4. To deaden the sound of (bells) by muffling the clapper.
Translations

Etymology 4

Possibly from Middle French buffet (side table), of unknown origin.

Noun

buffet (plural buffets)

  1. A low stool; a hassock.

Further reading

  • buffet on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Finnish

Etymology

From French buffet.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbyfːeː/, [ˈbyfːe̞ː]
  • IPA(key): /ˈbufːetːi/, [ˈbufːe̞t̪ːi] (colloquial)

Noun

buffet

  1. buffet

Usage notes

The endings of the alternative, somewhat Finnicized forms buffetti and especially bufetti better fit the structure of Finnish.

Most Finns don’t know that the letter t in the form “buffet” is silent (and that the letter u is pronounced [y]) and are not sure how to decline this form because Finnish nouns don’t end in -t in the singular. They therefore consciously or unconsciously change the ending in the nominative to the more Finnish ending -tti in speaking, despite the fact that the French pronunciation (with [y] and silent t) is the only one listed in the Kielitoimiston sanakirja.

Most Finns have trouble pronouncing the sound [b] and many the sound [f], so the completely Finnicized form puhvetti is in fact widespread in speech even though the spelling buffetti is the most common.

Declension


French

Etymology

From Middle French bufet (1150), from Old French bufet, of uncertain origin; possibly a Celtic borrowing. Compare Scottish Gaelic biadh (food, sustenance), buadha (valuable, precious). Or, according to the Digitized Treasury of the French Language, from an imitative source akin to bouffer (to eat (in excess)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /by.fɛ/

Noun

buffet m (plural buffets)

  1. sideboard, dresser (a piece of furniture)
  2. buffet (food)
  3. (slang) belly

Synonyms

(sideboard):

  • crédence

Derived terms

Descendants

References

  • “buffet” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Further reading

  • “buffet” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

From French buffet.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bufˈfɛ/**, /bufˈfe/**, (careful style) /byfˈfɛ/**

Noun

buffet m (invariable)

  1. (furniture) sideboard
    Synonym: dispensa
  2. buffet, refreshment bar

References

Further reading

  • buffet in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Norwegian Bokmål

Alternative forms

  • buffé, buffe

Etymology

From French buffet.

Noun

buffet m (definite singular buffeten, indefinite plural buffeter, definite plural buffetene)

  1. sideboard or buffet (US) (dining room furniture containing table linen and services)
  2. buffet (counter or room where refreshments are sold)
  3. stående buffet – buffet (a meal which guests can serve themselves)

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • buffé, buffe

Etymology

From French buffet.

Noun

buffet m (definite singular buffeten, indefinite plural buffetar, definite plural buffetane)

  1. sideboard or buffet (US) (dining room furniture containing table linen and services)
  2. buffet (a counter or room where refreshments are sold)
  3. ståande buffet – buffet (a meal which guests can serve themselves)

Portuguese

Alternative forms

  • bufê, bufete
  • bifê (proscribed)

Etymology

From French buffet.

Pronunciation

Noun

buffet m (plural buffets)

  1. ? (proscribed) buffet (food laid out so diners may serve themselves)

Further reading

  • “buffet” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish

Alternative forms

  • bufet

Etymology

From French buffet. Doublet of bufete.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /buˈfet/, [buˈfet̪]

Noun

buffet m (plural buffets)

  1. buffet

Further reading

  • “bufet” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkaʊntɚ/, [ˈkʰaʊ̯ɾ̃ɚ]
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkaʊntə/
  • Rhymes: -aʊntə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: count‧er

Etymology 1

From Anglo-Norman countour, from Old French conteor (French comptoir), from Medieval Latin computātōrium, from Latin computō. Doublet of kontor and cantore.

Noun

counter (plural counters)

  1. One who counts.
  2. A reckoner; someone who collects data by counting; an enumerator.
  3. An object (now especially a small disc) used in counting or keeping count, or as a marker in games, etc.
  4. A telltale; a contrivance attached to an engine, printing press, or other machine, for the purpose of counting the revolutions or the pulsations.
  5. (programming) A variable, memory location, etc. whose contents are incremented to keep a count.
  6. (Internet) A hit counter.
  7. A table or board on which money is counted and over which business is transacted
  8. A shop tabletop on which goods are examined, weighed or measured.
  9. In a kitchen, a surface, often built into the wall and above a cabinet, designed to be used for food preparation.
  10. In a bathroom, a surface, often built into the wall and above a cabinet, which holds the washbasin.
  11. (curling) Any stone lying closer to the center than any of the opponent’s stones.
  12. (historical) The prison attached to a city court; a compter.
    • 1590, John Greenwood, Christopher Bowman’s Petition
      He remaynes prisonner in the Counter in Woodstrete in the hole, by the contagiousing wherof he is lyke to perishe
  13. (grammar) A class of word used along with numbers to count objects and events, typically mass nouns. Although rare and optional in English (e.g. “20 head of cattle”), they are numerous and required in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.
Derived terms
Synonyms
  • (grammar) measure word
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old French contre, Anglo-Norman cuntre, both from Latin contra.

Adverb

counter (not comparable)

  1. Contrary, in opposition; in an opposite direction.
    • running counter to all the rules of virtue
  2. In the wrong way; contrary to the right course.
    a hound that runs counter
    • 2004, Bee Lavender, Maia Rossini, Mamaphonic: Balancing Motherhood and Other Creative Acts
      She hated being pregnant; it ran counter to everything she wanted from her body
    • 1615, George Sandys, The Relation of a Journey begun an. Dom. 1610, in four books
      which [darts] they never throw counter, but at the back of the flyer
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:contrarily
Translations

Noun

counter (plural counters)

  1. Something opposite or contrary to something else.
  2. (martial arts) A proactive defensive hold or move in reaction to a hold or move by one’s opponent.
  3. (nautical) The overhanging stern of a vessel above the waterline, below and somewhat forward of the stern proper.
  4. The piece of a shoe or a boot around the heel of the foot (above the heel of the shoe/boot).
    • 1959, J. D. Salinger, Seymour: An Introduction:
      Seymour, sitting in an old corduroy armchair across the room, a cigarette going, wearing a blue shirt, gray slacks, moccasins with the counters broken down, a shaving cut on the side of his face []
  5. (music) Alternative form of contra Formerly used to designate any under part which served for contrast to a principal part, but now used as equivalent to countertenor.
  6. The breast of a horse; that part of a horse between the shoulders and under the neck.
  7. (typography) The enclosed or partly closed negative space of a glyph.
  8. (obsolete) An encounter.
    • with kindly counter under mimic shade
Translations

Verb

counter (third-person singular simple present counters, present participle countering, simple past and past participle countered)

  1. To contradict, oppose.
  2. (boxing) To return a blow while receiving one, as in boxing.
    • 1857, Charles Kingsley, Two Years Ago
      His left hand countered provokingly.
  3. To take action in response to; to respond.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To encounter.
Translations

Adjective

counter (not comparable)

  1. Contrary or opposing
    Synonyms: opposite, contrasted, opposed, adverse, antagonistic
    • a. 1865, Isaac Taylor, Mind in Form
      Innumerable facts attesting the counter principle.
Derived terms

Anagrams

  • Cureton, Cutrone, cornute, countre, recount, trounce

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English counter.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɑu̯n.tər/
  • Hyphenation: coun‧ter

Noun

counter m (plural counters)

  1. (chiefly sports, especially soccer) counter-attack, counter
    Synonym: tegenaanval

Related terms

  • counteren

Old French

Verb

counter

  1. Late Anglo-Norman spelling of conter

Conjugation

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-ts, *-tt are modified to z, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.


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