buffoon vs clown what difference

what is difference between buffoon and clown

English

Etymology

From Middle French bouffon, from Italian buffone (jester), from buffare (to puff out the cheeks), of unknown origin. Compare Middle High German buffen (“to puff”; > German büffen), Old English pyffan (to breathe out, blow with the mouth). More at English puff.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bəˈfuːn/
  • Rhymes: -uːn

Noun

buffoon (plural buffoons)

  1. One who acts in a silly or ridiculous fashion; a clown or fool.
    • 1810, W. Melmoth (translator), Letters of Pliny
      To divert the audience with buffoon postures and antic dances.
  2. (derogatory) An unintentionally ridiculous person.

Usage notes

  • In the United States the term most commonly refers to inappropriate, clownish figures on the public stage; here the behavior of a variety of public figures have caused them to be referred to as buffoons by their political opponents.
  • In the United Kingdom the term is used more broadly, to refer to such people who are retained in popular regard but who nevertheless engender amusement with their pronouncements and acts.

Derived terms

  • buffoonery

Translations

Verb

buffoon (third-person singular simple present buffoons, present participle buffooning, simple past and past participle buffooned)

  1. To behave like a buffoon

Translations



English

Alternative forms

  • clowne, cloyne (obsolete)

Etymology

From earlier clowne, cloyne (man of rustic or coarse manners, boor, peasant), likely of North Germanic origin, akin to Icelandic klunni (clumsy fellow, klutz). Compare also North Frisian klönne (clumsy fellow, klutz), Dutch kluns (clumsy fellow). Unlikely from Latin colōnus (colonist, farmer), although learned awareness of this term may have influenced semantic development.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: kloun, IPA(key): /klaʊn/
  • Rhymes: -aʊn

Noun

clown (plural clowns)

  1. A slapstick performance artist often associated with a circus and usually characterized by bright, oversized clothing, a red nose, face paint, and a brightly colored wig.
    • 2008, Lich King, “Black Metal Sucks”, Toxic Zombie Onslaught.
  2. A person who acts in a silly fashion.
  3. A stupid person.
  4. (obsolete) A man of coarse nature and manners; an awkward fellow; an illbred person; a boor.
    • 1700, Timothy Nourse, Campania Foelix, pp. 15–16
      [] three things ought always to be kept under: a mastiff dog, a stone horse and a clown; and really I think a snarling, cross-grained clown to be the most unlucky beast of three.
  5. (obsolete) One who works upon the soil; a rustic; a churl; a yokel.
    • The clown, the child of nature, without guile.
    • August 25, 1759, Samuel Johnson, The Idler No. 71
      He [] began to descend to familiar questions, endeavouring to accommodate his discourse to the grossness of rustic understandings. The clowns soon found that he did not know wheat from rye, and began to despise him; one of the boys, by pretending to show him a bird’s nest, decoyed him into a ditch; []
  6. A clownfish

Synonyms

  • (person who acts in a silly fashion): buffoon, fool

Derived terms

  • clown beetle
  • class clown
  • clown doctor
  • clownfish
  • clownish

Translations

Verb

clown (third-person singular simple present clowns, present participle clowning, simple past and past participle clowned)

  1. (intransitive) To act in a silly or playful fashion.
  2. (transitive, African-American Vernacular) To ridicule.
    • 2002, Vibe (volume 10, number 11, page 62)
      The show Dismissed was one of my favorites, because I like to see people get clowned.
    • 2017, Darrell Smith, Miracle Baby
      All my comrades were laughing and clowning me, but shit, that didn’t stop me from talking more shit.

Derived terms

  • clown about (British)
  • clown around

See also

  • coulrophobia
  • jester
  • jackpudding

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English clown.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /klɑu̯n/
  • Hyphenation: clown
  • Rhymes: -ɑu̯n

Noun

clown m (plural clowns, diminutive clowntje n)

  1. clown (entertainer)

Derived terms

  • circusclown
  • clownsneus
  • clownvis

See also

  • august
  • harlekijn
  • paljas
  • pierrot
  • nar
  • witte clown
  • zot

French

Etymology

From English clown.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /klun/
  • Homophone: clowns

Noun

clown m (plural clowns)

  1. clown (performer)
  2. clown (person who acts in a comic way)

Synonyms

  • (performer): (Louisiana) macaque

Derived terms

  • pantalon clown /pantalon de clown

Further reading

  • “clown” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈklawn/

Noun

clown m (invariable)

  1. clown (artist)
    Synonym: pagliaccio

References


Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): //klawn//

Noun

clown m pers

  1. (comedy) Alternative spelling of klaun.

Declension

Derived terms

  • (noun) clownada
  • (adjective) clownowski

Further reading

  • clown in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • clown in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Spanish

Alternative forms

  • clon

Etymology

From English clown.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈklon/, [ˈklõn]

Noun

clown m (plural clownes)

  1. clown (circus performance artist)
    Synonym: payaso

Swedish

Etymology

From English clown.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈklaʊn/

Noun

clown c

  1. clown

Declension

Synonyms

  • pajas

Derived terms

  • clownaktig
  • clownfisk

References

  • clown in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /klɔu̯n/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English clown.

Noun

clown m (plural clowniaid)

  1. clown

Etymology 2

Alternative forms

  • closwn (colloquial, first-person singular conditional)

Verb

clown

  1. first-person plural present/future of cloi
  2. first-person singular imperfect/conditional of cloi
  3. (literary) first-person plural imperative of cloi

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