bug vs tap what difference

what is difference between bug and tap

English

Etymology

First attested in this form around 1620 (referring to a bedbug), from earlier bugge (beetle), a conflation of two words:

  1. Middle English bugge (scarecrow, hobgoblin), from Proto-Germanic *bugja- (swollen up, thick), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰew-, *bu- (to swell) (compare Norwegian bugge (big man), dialectal Low German Bögge (goblin”, “snot)). Or, from a word related to buck and originally referring to a goat-shaped specter.
  2. Middle English budde (beetle), from Old English budda (see sċearnbudda (dung beetle)), from Proto-Germanic *buddô, *buzdô, from the same ultimate source as above (compare Low German Budde (louse, grub), Norwegian budda (newborn domestic animal)). More at bud.

The term is used to refer to technical errors and problems at least as early as the 19th century, predating the commonly known story of a moth being caught in a computer.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bŭg, IPA(key): /bʌɡ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌɡ
  • Hyphenation: bug

Noun

bug (plural bugs)

  1. (entomology) An insect of the order Hemiptera (the “true bugs”).
  2. Any of various species of marine or freshwater crustaceans; e.g. a Moreton Bay bug, mudbug.
  3. (informal) Any insect, arachnid, or other terrestrial arthropod that is a pest.
  4. (US) Any insect, arachnid, myriapod or entognath.
  5. (Britain, obsolete, specifically) A bedbug.
    • 1874, Henry Sampson, A history of advertising (page 278)
      Speaking of advertising changes of name, a title by which those lodging-house pests, bugs, are now often known, that of Norfolk Howards, is derived from an advertisement in which one Ephraim Bug avowed his intention of being for the future known as Norfolk Howard.
  6. (chiefly computing and engineering jargon) A problem that needs fixing.
    Synonyms: defect, glitch
  7. A contagious illness, or a bacterium or virus causing it.
  8. (informal) An enthusiasm for something; an obsession.
  9. (informal) A keen enthusiast or hobbyist.
    • 1961, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance (volume 15, number 12, page 34)
      Incidentally, the camera manufacturers have had a new worry—that they might “kill off the hobby,” as U.S. Camera magazine put it recently—by automating to the point that real camera bugs would feel no challenge.
  10. A concealed electronic eavesdropping or intercept device.
  11. A small and usually invisible file (traditionally a single-pixel image) on a World Wide Web page, primarily used to track users.
  12. (broadcasting) A small, usually transparent or translucent image placed in a corner of a television program to identify the broadcasting network or cable channel.
  13. (aviation) A manually positioned marker in flight instruments.
    • 2004, Flying Magazine (volume 131, number 10, page 10)
      You look up the proper speed for the phase of flight, set the reminder bug, and then literally forget the speed. You don’t read the airspeed number, you fly to the bug.
  14. A semi-automated telegraph key.
  15. (obsolete) Hobgoblin, scarecrow; anything that terrifies. [late 14th c.–early 17th. c]
    Synonyms: bog, bogey, bogle, boggle, boggard, bugbear
  16. (chiefly LGBT, “the bug”) HIV.
    • 2019, Tora Holmberg, Annika Jonsson, Fredrik Palm, Death Matters: Cultural Sociology of Mortal Life, Springer (→ISBN), page 130:
      The arguably most debated bareback practice that came to attract attention early on (and still does) was that of “bug chasing,” in which HIV-negative men (bug chasers) actively seek out sex with HIV-positive men (gift givers).
  17. (poker) A limited form of wild card in some variants of poker.
  18. (paleontology, slang) A trilobite.
    • 2007, Kirk Johnson, Cruisin’ the Fossil Freeway, p. 174:
      We asked Harris if he had any recommendations about seeing the famous trilobite digs. He said we should just drive out to his claim in the Wheeler Quadrangle, and it was just fine with him if we dug a few bugs.
  19. (petroleum industry, slang, dated) Synonym of oil bug
    • July 1933, Popular Science:
      Now, only three years later, most of the major oil companies maintain staffs of these men who examine cores, classify the various types of “bugs,” or foraminifera, and make charts showing the depths at which each of the hundreds of types is found.
  20. (slang, US, horse-racing) An asterisk denoting an apprentice jockey’s weight allowance.
    • 1999, Anita Scialli, Inside Track 1999 (page 62)
      The “bugs” are the asterisks next to the apprentice’s name. One bug is a five-pound allowance, two bugs equal seven pounds, and three bugs equal ten pounds.
  21. (slang, US, horse-racing, by extension) A young apprentice jockey.
    Synonym: bug boy
  22. (printing) Synonym of union bug
  23. (gambling, slang) A small piece of metal used in a slot machine to block certain winning combinations.
    • 1961, John Scarne, Complete Guide to Gambling (page 394)
      Because many illegal slot-machine operators here and abroad do not like to give the slot-machine player even one chance to hit the jackpot or the big bonus, they make use of a “bug.” This is a small, flat half-circle of iron about an inch long, which looks something like a bug.

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often applied to “bug”: major, minor, serious, critical, nasty, annoying, important, strange, stupid, flying, silly.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:defect

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

bug (third-person singular simple present bugs, present participle bugging, simple past and past participle bugged)

  1. (informal, transitive) To annoy.
  2. (informal, intransitive) To act suspiciously or irrationally, especially in a way that annoys others.
  3. (transitive) To install an electronic listening device or devices in.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:annoy

Derived terms

  • bug out

Translations

References

Further reading

  • Hemiptera on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Hemiptera on Wikispecies.Wikispecies
  • Hemiptera on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons
  • Software bug on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • GBU, gub

Catalan

Etymology

English bug

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /buk/, /bak/

Noun

bug m (plural bugs)

  1. (computing) bug
    Synonyms: error, defecte

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse búkr, from Proto-Germanic *būkaz, cognate wtih Norwegian, Swedish buk, German Bauch, Dutch buik.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /buːˀɣ/, [ˈb̥uˀ]

Noun

bug c (singular definite bugen, plural indefinite buge)

  1. belly (the lower part the body of an animal or, by analogy, an aircraft)
  2. abdomen, abdominal cavity (the lower inner part of a human body)
    Synonym: mave
  3. (informal) belly, paunch (a large protruding belly)
    Synonyms: mave, vom

Inflection


Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English bug.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʏɡ/, /bɑɡ/
  • Hyphenation: bug

Noun

bug m (plural bugs)

  1. (computing) A bug (a software problem).

French

Alternative forms

  • (computing) bogue

Etymology

English bug

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bœɡ/, /bɔɡ/

Noun

bug m (plural bugs)

  1. (slang) bug (problem, especially in computing)

Derived terms

  • buguer

Karipúna Creole French

Etymology

From French bougre (chap, guy)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbuɡ/

Noun

bug

  1. boy (young male human)

References

  • 1987, Alfred W. Tobler, Dicionário Crioulo Karipúna/Português Português/Crioulo Karípúna, Summer Institute of Linguistics, page 5.

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English bug.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈbɐɡ/, /ˈbɐ.ɡi/, /ˈbuɡ/, /ˈbu.ɡi/

Noun

bug m (plural bugs)

  1. (computing) bug (error in a program’s functioning)
    Synonyms: defeito, falha, erro
  2. (slang) anything causing unusual behaviour

Derived terms

  • bugado
  • bugar

Spanish

Etymology

English bug

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /baɡ/, /boɡ/, /buɡ/

Noun

bug m (plural bugs)

  1. (computing) bug
    Synonyms: fallo, defecto


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tæp/, [tʰæp]
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /tɐːp/
  • Rhymes: -æp

Etymology 1

From Middle English tappe, from Old English tæppa, from Proto-Germanic *tappô. The verb is from Middle English tappen, from Old English tæppian, from Proto-Germanic *tappōną, from the noun.

Noun

tap (plural taps)

  1. A tapering cylindrical pin or peg used to stop the vent in a cask.
    Synonyms: spigot, spile
  2. A device used to dispense liquids.
    Synonyms: faucet, handle, spigot, spout
  3. Liquor drawn through a tap; hence, a certain kind or quality of liquor.
  4. A place where liquor is drawn for drinking.
    Synonyms: taproom, bar
  5. (mechanics) A device used to cut an internal screw thread. (External screw threads are cut with a die.)
  6. A connection made to an electrical or fluid conductor without breaking it.
  7. An interception of communication by authority.
  8. A device used to listen in secretly on telephone calls. [from 20th c.]
  9. (medicine, informal) A procedure that removes fluid from a body cavity.
    Synonym: paracentesis
  10. (finance) The situation where a borrowing government authority issues bonds over a period of time, usually at a fixed price, with volumes sold on a particular day dependent on market conditions.
    tap issue; a bond tap
Derived terms
  • tapless
  • taproom
  • taproot
  • tap water
Translations

Verb

tap (third-person singular simple present taps, present participle tapping, simple past and past participle tapped)

  1. To furnish with taps.
  2. To draw off liquid from a vessel.
  3. To deplete, especially of a liquid via a tap; to tap out.
  4. To exploit.
  5. To place a listening or recording device on a telephone or wired connection. [from 19th c.]
  6. To intercept a communication without authority.
    Synonym: eavesdrop
  7. (mechanical) To cut an internal screw thread.
  8. (card games, board games) To turn or flip a card or playing piece to remind players that it has already been used that turn (by analogy to “tapping,” in the sense of drawing on to the point of temporary exhaustion, the resources or abilities represented by the card).
  9. (informal) To cadge, borrow or beg.
  10. (medicine, informal) To drain off fluid by paracentesis.
  11. To advance someone for a post or job, or for membership of a club.
Derived terms
  • on tap
  • on the tap
  • tap into
  • tapped out
  • tap to pay
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English tappen, teppen, from Old French tapper, taper (to tap), of Germanic origin, from Frankish *tappōn, *dabbōn (to strike) or from Middle Low German tappen, tapen (“to tap, rap, strike”); both ultimately from Proto-Germanic *dab- (to strike), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰAbʰ- (to beat, strike, stun, be speechless). Related to German tappen (to grope, fumble), Icelandic tappa, tapsa, tæpta (to tap). Related to dab.

Verb

tap (third-person singular simple present taps, present participle tapping, simple past and past participle tapped)

  1. To strike lightly. [from early 13th c.]
  2. To touch one’s finger, foot, or other body parts on a surface (usually) repeatedly.
    Synonyms: hit, patter, pound, rap, strike; see also Thesaurus:hit
  3. To make a sharp noise.
    Synonyms: hit, bang, ping, rap
  4. (graphical user interface) To operate an electronic device (e.g. a mobile phone) by tapping a specific place on its (capacitive or other) touch screen.
    Coordinate term: click
  5. To designate for some duty or for membership, as in ‘a tap on the shoulder’. [from mid-20th c.]
  6. (slang, vulgar, transitive) To have sexual intercourse with.
    Synonyms: go to bed with, hit, sleep with, wap; see also Thesaurus:copulate with
  7. (combat sports) To submit to an opponent by tapping one’s hand repeatedly.
    Synonym: tap out
  8. (combat sports, transitive) To force (an opponent) to submit.
    Synonym: tap out
  9. To put a new sole or heel on.
Translations

Noun

tap (plural taps)

  1. A gentle or slight blow; a light rap; a pat.
    • each of them shakes her Fan at me with a smile , then gives her right-hand woman a tap upon the shoulder
  2. (dance) Ellipsis of tap dance.
  3. (computing, graphical user interface) The act of touching a touch screen.
    Coordinate term: click
  4. A piece of leather fastened upon the bottom of a boot or shoe in repairing or renewing the sole or heel.
    Synonym: heeltap
  5. (military) A signal, by drum or trumpet, for extinguishing all lights in soldiers’ quarters and retiring to bed; usually given about a quarter of an hour after tattoo.
  6. (phonetics) A consonant sound made by a single muscle contraction, such as the sound [ɾ] in the standard American English pronunciation of body.
    Synonym: flap
  7. Short for tap of work.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      For to the first floor his duties never took him, at this period, nor to the second, once he had made his bed, and swept clean his little room, which he did every morning the first thing, before coming down, on an empty stomach. Whereas Erskine never did a tap on the ground floor, but all his duties were on the first floor.
Translations

Etymology 3

Hindi [Term?]

Noun

tap

  1. An Indian malarial fever.

References

Anagrams

  • APT, ATP, PAT, PTA, Pat, TPA, ap’t, apt, apt., pat

Albanian

Etymology

Onomatopoeic.

Noun

tap

  1. struck, hit

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈtap/
  • Rhymes: -ap

Noun

tap m (plural taps)

  1. tap, spigot, plug
  2. (castells) A casteller inserted into an empty space in a pinya to make it more compact

Derived terms

  • ésser un tap de barral

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Danish tapp.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtap/, [ˈtˢɑb̥]

Noun

tap c (singular definite tappen, plural indefinite tappe or tapper)

  1. (mechanics) protruding component of a device
  2. (anatomy) cone cell
  3. (informal) penis
  4. (erotic literature) clitoris
    • 2014, Hans Otto Jørgensen, Ove gasser op: Udvalgte noveller, Gyldendal A/S (→ISBN)
      Hun kælede for hullet med spidsen, krængede lapperne yderligere, og så fandeme kom også dér tappen til syne.
    • 2014, 2016, Christian Møgeltoft, Uskyld, Lindhardt og Ringhof (→ISBN)
      Da hans tunge fandt den lille hårde tap, klynkede hun som et barn, der bliver slået.

Inflection

Etymology 2

Acronym of teknisk-administrativt personale.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtap/, [ˈtˢɑb̥]

Noun

tap c (singular definite tap’en, plural indefinite tap’er)

  1. member of technical and administrative staff

Inflection

Etymology 3

Verb

tap

  1. imperative of tappe

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch tappe (closing pin, stopper), from Old Dutch *tappo, from Proto-Germanic *tappô.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɑp/
  • Hyphenation: tap
  • Rhymes: -ɑp

Noun

tap m (plural tappen, diminutive tapje n)

  1. tap

Usage notes

Although this term can be used to mean a tap from which water flows, this usage is rare; the more common term is kraan. It is most commonly used to refer to a beer tap.

Synonyms

  • kraan

Derived terms

  • biertap
  • flappentap
  • tapbier
  • tappen

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: tap

Icelandic

Etymology

From tapa (to lose).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʰaːp/
  • Rhymes: -aːp

Noun

tap n (genitive singular taps, nominative plural töp)

  1. loss, damage

Declension

Related terms

  • tapa

K’iche’

Noun

tap

  1. (Classical K’iche’) crab

Lashi

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tap/

Verb

tap

  1. to make something burn
  2. to make something stick

References

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[4], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

Malecite-Passamaquoddy

Etymology

Cognate with Penobscot ttὰpi, Mi’kmaq tapi, Abenaki t8bi.

Noun

tap anim (plural tapiyik/tapihik, possessed ‘tahtapiyil/’tahtapimol/’tapiyil, locative tapik/tapiyik, diminutive tapossis)

  1. bow

Middle English

Verb

tap

  1. Alternative form of tappen (to touch gently)

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɑːp/

Noun

tap n (definite singular tapet, indefinite plural tap, definite plural tapa or tapene)

  1. (a) loss

Derived terms

Related terms

  • tape (Etymology 2)

References

  • “tap” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɑːp/

Noun

tap n (definite singular tapet, indefinite plural tap, definite plural tapa)

  1. (a) loss, defeat

Derived terms

References

  • “tap” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Phalura

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tap/

Adverb

tap (Perso-Arabic spelling تپ)

  1. Co-lexicalized intensifier

References

  • Liljegren, Henrik; Haider, Naseem (2011) Palula Vocabulary (FLI Language and Culture Series; 7)‎[5], Islamabad, Pakistan: Forum for Language Initiatives, →ISBN

Semai

Etymology

From Proto-Mon-Khmer. Cognate with Pacoh tâp (to bury), Riang [Lang] tap² (“to dam”), Mal tʰap (“to bury”), Mon တိုပ် (to bury), Vietnamese đắp (to cover something with a layer).

Verb

tap

  1. to bury

Synonyms

  • (to bury): choop
  • (to plant): chet

References


Spanish

Noun

tap m (uncountable)

  1. tap, tap dancing

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