bugle vs bugleweed what difference

what is difference between bugle and bugleweed

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbjuːɡəl/
  • Rhymes: -uːɡəl

Etymology 1

From Middle English bugle, from Anglo-Norman and Old French bugle, from Latin buculus (young bull; ox; steer).

Noun

bugle (plural bugles)

  1. A horn used by hunters.
  2. (music) a simple brass instrument consisting of a horn with no valves, playing only pitches in its harmonic series
  3. Anything shaped like a bugle, round or conical and having a bell on one end.
  4. The sound of something that bugles.
  5. A sort of wild ox; a buffalo.

Synonyms
  • (shaped like a bugle): cone, funnel
Hypernyms
  • musical instrument
Derived terms
  • bugler
Coordinate terms
  • trumpet
Translations

Verb

bugle (third-person singular simple present bugles, present participle bugling, simple past and past participle bugled)

  1. To announce, sing, or cry in the manner of a musical bugle.
Synonyms
  • trumpet
Translations

Etymology 2

From Late Latin bugulus (a woman’s ornament).

Noun

bugle (plural bugles)

  1. a tubular glass or plastic bead sewn onto clothes as a decorative trim
    • 1925, P. G. Wodehouse, Sam the Sudden, Random House, London:2007, p. 207.
      With the exception of a woman in a black silk dress with bugles who, incredible as it may seem, had ordered cocoa and sparkling limado simultaneously and was washing down a meal of Cambridge sausages and pastry with alternate draughts of both liquids, the place was empty.
Translations

Adjective

bugle (comparative more bugle, superlative most bugle)

  1. (obsolete) jet-black

Etymology 3

From Middle English bugle (bugleweed), from Anglo-Norman and Old French bugle, from Medieval Latin bugilla, probably related to Late Latin bugillo.

Noun

bugle (plural bugles)

  1. A plant in the family Lamiaceae grown as a ground cover, Ajuga reptans, and other plants in the genus Ajuga.
    Synonyms: bugleweed, carpet bugle, ground pine
Translations

Further reading

  • Bugle (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

bugle in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • bulge

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /byɡl/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English bugle, itself from Anglo-Norman and Old French bugle, from Latin buculus.

Noun

bugle m (plural bugles)

  1. bugle

Etymology 2

From Old French bugle, probably borrowed from Medieval Latin bugula, probably related to Late Latin bugillo (cf. bouillon).

Noun

bugle f (plural bugles)

  1. bugle, bugleweed

References

  • “bugle” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Old French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin būculus (bullock).

Noun

bugle m (oblique plural bugles, nominative singular bugles, nominative plural bugle)

  1. bugle (type of horn, often used in battle)
    • (Can we date this quote?) Fouke le Fitz Waryn, ed. E. J. Hathaway, P. T. Ricketts, C. A. Robson and A. D. Wilshere, ANTS 26-28 (1975).
      oy un chevaler soner un gros bugle

      (I) hear a knight sounding a large bugle

Descendants

  • Middle English: bugle (through Anglo-Norman)
    • English: bugle
  • French: beugler


English

Etymology

bugle +‎ weed

Noun

bugleweed (plural bugleweeds)

  1. Any of the aromatic herbs in genus Lycopus, especially Lycopus virginicus, water horehound
  2. Ajuga, a group of herbs used for ground cover; bugle

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