build vs physique what difference

what is difference between build and physique

English

Etymology

From Middle English bilden, from Old English byldan (to build, construct), from Proto-Germanic *buþlijaną (to build), from Proto-Germanic *buþlą, *bōþlą (house, dwelling, farm), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH- (to become, grow, thrive, be, live, dwell). Related to Old English bold (abode, house, dwelling-place, mansion, hall, castle, temple). More at bottle.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪld/
  • Rhymes: -ɪld
  • Homophone: billed

Verb

build (third-person singular simple present builds, present participle building, simple past and past participle built or (archaic or poetic) builded)

  1. (transitive) To form (something) by combining materials or parts.
  2. (transitive) To develop or give form to (something) according to a plan or process.
  3. (transitive) To increase or strengthen (something) by adding gradually to.
  4. (transitive) To establish a basis for (something).
  5. (intransitive) To form by combining materials or parts.
  6. (intransitive) To develop in magnitude or extent.
  7. (transitive, computing) To construct (software) by compiling its source code.
  8. (intransitive, computing, of source code) To be converted into software by compilation, usually with minimal human intervention.
Conjugation

Usage notes

  • The simple past tense and past participle used to be builded; however, that form is now archaic, having been superseded by the form built.
    I have seen Him in the watchfires of a hundred circling camps / They have builded Him an altar in the evening dews and damps. (Julia Ward Howe, Battle Hymn of the Republic – 1861)

Synonyms

  • (to form by combining materials or parts): construct, erect
  • (to develop or give form to according to a plan or process): create
  • (to increase or strengthen by adding gradually to): build up, enlarge, increase, strengthen
  • (to establish a basis for): base, found, ground

Antonyms

  • (to form by combining materials or parts): demolish, destroy, ruin, wreck
  • (to increase or strengthen by adding gradually to): decrease, dissipate, weaken

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

build (countable and uncountable, plural builds)

  1. (countable, uncountable) The physique of a human body; constitution or structure of a human body.
    Rugby players are of sturdy build.
  2. (computing, countable) Any of various versions of a software product as it is being developed for release to users.
    The computer company has introduced a new prototype build to beta testers.
  3. (gaming, slang, countable) A structure, such as a building, statue, pool or forest, or a configuration of a character’s items or skills, created by the player.
    I made a build that looked like the Parthenon in that game.
    • 2005, Bill Slavicsek, Richard Baker, Dungeons & Dragons For Dummies (page 279)
      In fact, thousands of D&D players constantly debate the virtues of various character builds (combinations of race, class, feat, and spell choices) and share their efforts with each other in hundreds of message boards and mailing lists.

Translations



English

Etymology

From French physique.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -iːk

Noun

physique (plural physiques)

  1. The natural constitution, or physical structure, of a person.
    Synonym: body
  2. (bodybuilding) The trained muscular structure of a person’s body.

Translations

Derived terms

  • physique magazine

French

Etymology

From Latin physicus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fi.zik/

Adjective

physique (plural physiques)

  1. physical, sportive
    Monter un immeuble d’une centaine d’étages par les escaliers est une activité plutôt physique.

Derived terms

  • personne physique

Noun

physique m (plural physiques)

  1. physique
    Certaines personnes jugent les gens seulement sur leur physique.
    Certains métiers nécessitent un bon physique et un entraînement régulier.

Derived terms

  • avoir le physique de l’emploi
  • physique du rôle

Noun

physique f (plural physiques)

  1. physics
    Ses matières préférées sont la chimie et la physique.

Derived terms

  • physique des particules

Related terms

  • physicien

Further reading

  • “physique” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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