bulge vs bulk what difference

what is difference between bulge and bulk

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bʌldʒ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /bʌldʒ/, /bʊldʒ/

Etymology

From Middle English bulge (leather bag; hump), from Old Northern French boulge (leather bag), from Late Latin bulga (leather sack), from Gaulish *bulga, *bulgos, from Proto-Celtic *bolgos (sack, bag, stomach). Cognate with bilge, belly, bellows, budget, French bouge, German Balg, etc. Doublet of budge. See also budget.

Noun

bulge (plural bulges)

  1. Something sticking out from a surface; a swelling, protuberant part; a bending outward, especially when caused by pressure.
  2. The bilge or protuberant part of a cask.
  3. (nautical) The bilge of a vessel.
  4. (colloquial) The outline of male genitals visible through clothing.
  5. (figuratively) A sudden rise in value or quantity.
    • 1930, Stanford University, Wheat Studies of the Food Research Institute (volume 7, page 204)
      A second bulge in prices occurred during September 30 — October 9. The rise of prices up to October 3 was in part apparently a technical adjustment of the markets, a reaction to the preceding decline.

Derived terms

  • cockbulge
  • manbulge

Translations

See also

  • bulge bracket

Verb

bulge (third-person singular simple present bulges, present participle bulging, simple past and past participle bulged)

  1. (intransitive) To stick out from (a surface).
    The submarine bulged because of the enormous air pressure inside.
    He stood six feet tall, with muscular arms bulging out of his black T-shirt.
  2. (intransitive) To bilge, as a ship; to founder.
    • 1739, William Broome, “The Battle of the Gods and Titans” in Poems on Several Occasions, London: Henry Lintot, p. 253,[2]
      Fatal to Man! at once all Ocean roars,
      And scattered navies bulge on distant shores.

Derived terms

  • abulge

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Bugle, bugle


English

Etymology

From Middle English bulk, bolke (a heap, cargo, hold; heap; bulge), borrowed from Old Norse búlki (the freight or the cargo of a ship), from Proto-Germanic *bulkô (beam, pile, heap), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰelǵ- (beam, pile, prop). Compare Icelandic búlkast (to be bulky), Swedish dialectal bulk (a bunch), Danish bulk (bump, knob).

Conflated with Middle English bouk (belly, trunk).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bŭlk, IPA(key): /bʌlk/
  • Rhymes: -ʌlk

Noun

bulk (countable and uncountable, plural bulks)

(Can we add an example for this sense?)

  1. Size, specifically, volume.
    • 1729. I Newton, Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy, page 1.
      The Quantity of Matter is the measure of the same, arising from its density and bulk conjunctly.
    • The cliff-dwellers had chipped and chipped away at this boulder till it rested its tremendous bulk upon a mere pin-point of its surface.
  2. Any huge body or structure.
  3. The major part of something.
  4. Dietary fibre.
  5. (uncountable, transport) Unpackaged goods when transported in large volumes, e.g. coal, ore or grain.
  6. (countable) a cargo or any items moved or communicated in the manner of cargo.
  7. (bodybuilding) Excess body mass, especially muscle.
  8. (bodybuilding) A period where one tries to gain muscle.
  9. (brane cosmology) A hypothetical higher-dimensional space within which our own four-dimensional universe may exist.
  10. (obsolete) The body.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of George Turberville to this entry?)

Translations

Adjective

bulk (not comparable)

  1. being large in size, mass or volume (of goods, etc.)
  2. total

Translations

Derived terms

  • bulken (verb)

Verb

bulk (third-person singular simple present bulks, present participle bulking, simple past and past participle bulked)

  1. (intransitive) To appear or seem to be, as to bulk or extent.
  2. (intransitive) To grow in size; to swell or expand.
  3. (intransitive) To gain body mass by means of diet, exercise, etc.
  4. (transitive) To put or hold in bulk.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To add bulk to, to bulk out.

Related terms

  • bulker
  • bulkhead
  • bulky
  • bulk up
  • in bulk

Translations


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