bulge vs pouch what difference

what is difference between bulge and pouch

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bʌldʒ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /bʌldʒ/, /bʊldʒ/

Etymology

From Middle English bulge (leather bag; hump), from Old Northern French boulge (leather bag), from Late Latin bulga (leather sack), from Gaulish *bulga, *bulgos, from Proto-Celtic *bolgos (sack, bag, stomach). Cognate with bilge, belly, bellows, budget, French bouge, German Balg, etc. Doublet of budge. See also budget.

Noun

bulge (plural bulges)

  1. Something sticking out from a surface; a swelling, protuberant part; a bending outward, especially when caused by pressure.
  2. The bilge or protuberant part of a cask.
  3. (nautical) The bilge of a vessel.
  4. (colloquial) The outline of male genitals visible through clothing.
  5. (figuratively) A sudden rise in value or quantity.
    • 1930, Stanford University, Wheat Studies of the Food Research Institute (volume 7, page 204)
      A second bulge in prices occurred during September 30 — October 9. The rise of prices up to October 3 was in part apparently a technical adjustment of the markets, a reaction to the preceding decline.

Derived terms

  • cockbulge
  • manbulge

Translations

See also

  • bulge bracket

Verb

bulge (third-person singular simple present bulges, present participle bulging, simple past and past participle bulged)

  1. (intransitive) To stick out from (a surface).
    The submarine bulged because of the enormous air pressure inside.
    He stood six feet tall, with muscular arms bulging out of his black T-shirt.
  2. (intransitive) To bilge, as a ship; to founder.
    • 1739, William Broome, “The Battle of the Gods and Titans” in Poems on Several Occasions, London: Henry Lintot, p. 253,[2]
      Fatal to Man! at once all Ocean roars,
      And scattered navies bulge on distant shores.

Derived terms

  • abulge

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Bugle, bugle


English

Etymology

From Middle English pouche, poche, borrowed from Old Northern French pouche, from Old French poche, puche (whence French poche; compare also the Anglo-Norman variant poke), of Germanic origin: from Frankish *poka (pouch) (compare Middle Dutch poke, Old English pohha, dialectal German Pfoch). Compare pocket, poke.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /paʊt͡ʃ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊtʃ

Noun

pouch (plural pouches)

  1. A small bag usually closed with a drawstring.
  2. (zoology) An organic pocket in which a marsupial carries its young.
    Synonym: marsupium
  3. Any pocket or bag-shaped object, such as a cheek pouch.
  4. (slang, dated, derogatory) A protuberant belly; a paunch.
  5. A cyst or sac containing fluid.
    • 1747, Samuel Sharp, A Treatise on the Operations of Surgery
      [] form a large Pouch or Cyst
  6. (botany) A silicle, or short pod, as of the shepherd’s purse.
  7. A bulkhead in the hold of a vessel, to prevent grain etc. from shifting.

Derived terms

  • posing pouch

Translations

See also

  • bag
  • pocket
  • sack

Verb

pouch (third-person singular simple present pouches, present participle pouching, simple past and past participle pouched)

  1. (transitive) To enclose within a pouch.
  2. (transitive) To transport within a pouch, especially a diplomatic pouch.
  3. (of fowls and fish) To swallow.
  4. (obsolete) To pout.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ainsworth to this entry?)
  5. (obsolete) To pocket; to put up with.

Translations


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