bulk vs mass what difference

what is difference between bulk and mass

English

Etymology

From Middle English bulk, bolke (a heap, cargo, hold; heap; bulge), borrowed from Old Norse búlki (the freight or the cargo of a ship), from Proto-Germanic *bulkô (beam, pile, heap), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰelǵ- (beam, pile, prop). Compare Icelandic búlkast (to be bulky), Swedish dialectal bulk (a bunch), Danish bulk (bump, knob).

Conflated with Middle English bouk (belly, trunk).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bŭlk, IPA(key): /bʌlk/
  • Rhymes: -ʌlk

Noun

bulk (countable and uncountable, plural bulks)

(Can we add an example for this sense?)

  1. Size, specifically, volume.
    • 1729. I Newton, Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy, page 1.
      The Quantity of Matter is the measure of the same, arising from its density and bulk conjunctly.
    • The cliff-dwellers had chipped and chipped away at this boulder till it rested its tremendous bulk upon a mere pin-point of its surface.
  2. Any huge body or structure.
  3. The major part of something.
  4. Dietary fibre.
  5. (uncountable, transport) Unpackaged goods when transported in large volumes, e.g. coal, ore or grain.
  6. (countable) a cargo or any items moved or communicated in the manner of cargo.
  7. (bodybuilding) Excess body mass, especially muscle.
  8. (bodybuilding) A period where one tries to gain muscle.
  9. (brane cosmology) A hypothetical higher-dimensional space within which our own four-dimensional universe may exist.
  10. (obsolete) The body.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of George Turberville to this entry?)

Translations

Adjective

bulk (not comparable)

  1. being large in size, mass or volume (of goods, etc.)
  2. total

Translations

Derived terms

  • bulken (verb)

Verb

bulk (third-person singular simple present bulks, present participle bulking, simple past and past participle bulked)

  1. (intransitive) To appear or seem to be, as to bulk or extent.
  2. (intransitive) To grow in size; to swell or expand.
  3. (intransitive) To gain body mass by means of diet, exercise, etc.
  4. (transitive) To put or hold in bulk.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To add bulk to, to bulk out.

Related terms

  • bulker
  • bulkhead
  • bulky
  • bulk up
  • in bulk

Translations



English

Etymology 1

In late Middle English (circa 1400) as masse in the sense of “lump, quantity of matter”, from Anglo-Norman masse, in Old French attested from the 11th century, via late Latin massa (lump, dough), from Ancient Greek μᾶζα (mâza, barley-cake, lump (of dough)). The Greek noun is derived from the verb μάσσω (mássō, to knead), ultimately from a Proto-Indo-European *maǵ- (to oil, knead). Doublet of masa.
The sense of “a large number or quantity” arises circa 1580. The scientific sense is from 1687 (as Latin massa) in the works of Isaac Newton, with the first English use (as mass) occurring in 1704.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mæs/
  • Rhymes: -æs

Noun

mass (countable and uncountable, plural masses)

  1. (physical) Matter, material.
    1. A quantity of matter cohering together so as to make one body, or an aggregation of particles or things which collectively make one body or quantity, usually of considerable size
    2. (obsolete) Precious metal, especially gold or silver.
    3. (physics) The quantity of matter which a body contains, irrespective of its bulk or volume. It is one of four fundamental properties of matter. It is measured in kilograms in the SI system of measurement.
    4. (pharmacology) A medicinal substance made into a cohesive, homogeneous lump, of consistency suitable for making pills; as, blue mass.
    5. (medicine) A palpable or visible abnormal globular structure; a tumor.
    6. (bodybuilding) Excess body weight, especially in the form of muscle hypertrophy.
    7. (proscribed) Synonym of weight
  2. A large quantity; a sum.
    1. Bulk; magnitude; body; size.
    2. The principal part; the main body.
    3. A large body of individuals, especially persons.
    4. (in the plural) The lower classes of persons.
Derived terms
Coordinate terms

(matter):

  • weight
Translations
See also
  • Customary units: slug, pound, ounce, long ton (1.12 short tons), short ton (commonly used)
  • Metric units: gram (g), kilogram (kg), metric ton

Verb

mass (third-person singular simple present masses, present participle massing, simple past and past participle massed)

  1. (transitive) To form or collect into a mass; to form into a collective body; to bring together into masses; to assemble.
  2. (intransitive) To have a certain mass.

Synonyms

  • (to form into a mass): See also Thesaurus:assemble
  • (to collect into a mass): See also Thesaurus:coalesce or Thesaurus:round up
  • (to have a certain mass): weigh
Translations

Adjective

mass (not generally comparable, comparative masser, superlative massest)

  1. Involving a mass of things; concerning a large quantity or number.
  2. Involving a mass of people; of, for, or by the masses.
Translations

Derived terms

  • mass extinction

Etymology 2

From Middle English messe, masse, from Old English mæsse (the mass, church festival) and Old French messe, from Vulgar Latin *messa (Eucharist, dismissal), from Late Latin missa, noun use of feminine past participle of classical Latin mittere (to send), from ite, missa est (go, (the assembly) is dismissed), reanalyzed as “go, [that] is the missa“, last words of the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church. Compare Dutch mis (mass), German Messe (mass), Danish messe (mass), Swedish mässa (mass; expo), Icelandic messa (mass). More at mission.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɑːs
  • (US) IPA(key): /mæs/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /mæs/, /mɑːs/
  • Rhymes: -æs

Noun

mass (plural masses)

  1. (Christianity) The Eucharist, now especially in Roman Catholicism.
  2. (Christianity) Celebration of the Eucharist.
  3. (Christianity, usually as the Mass) The sacrament of the Eucharist.
  4. A musical setting of parts of the mass.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

mass (third-person singular simple present masses, present participle massing, simple past and past participle massed)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To celebrate mass.
    • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
      massing priests
Translations

Further reading

  • mass in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • mass in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • ASMS, ASMs, MSAs, SAMs, SMAs, SMSA, Sams, sams

Võro

Etymology 1

From Proto-Finnic *maksa, from Proto-Uralic *mëksa.

Noun

mass (genitive massa, partitive massa)

  1. liver
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)
Related to Estonian maks.

Noun

mass (genitive massu, partitive massu)

  1. tax, payment
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


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