bull vs cop what difference

what is difference between bull and cop

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʊl/
  • Rhymes: -ʊl

Etymology 1

From Middle English bole, bul, bule, from a conflation of Old English bula (bull, steer) and Old Norse boli, both from Proto-Germanic *bulô (bull), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰl̥no-, from *bʰel- (to blow, swell up). Cognate with West Frisian bolle, Dutch bul, German Low German Bull, German Bulle, Swedish bulla; also Old Irish ball (limb), Latin follis (bellows, leather bag), Thracian βόλινθος (vólinthos, wild bull), Albanian buall (buffalo) or related bolle (testicles), Ancient Greek φαλλός (phallós, penis).

Noun

bull (countable and uncountable, plural bulls)

  1. An adult male of domesticated cattle or oxen.
    1. Specifically, one that is uncastrated.
  2. A male of domesticated cattle or oxen of any age.
  3. Any adult male bovine.
  4. An adult male of certain large mammals, such as whales, elephants, camels and seals.
  5. A large, strong man.
  6. (finance) An investor who buys (commodities or securities) in anticipation of a rise in prices.
  7. (slang) A policeman.
    • The Bat—they called him the Bat. []. He’d never been in stir, the bulls had never mugged him, he didn’t run with a mob, he played a lone hand, and fenced his stuff so that even the fence couldn’t swear he knew his face.
    1. (US) Specifically, a policeman employed in a railroad yard.
  8. (LGBT, slang) An elderly lesbian.
  9. (Britain, historical, obsolete slang) A crown coin; its value, 5 shillings.
    • 1859, J.C. Hotten, A Dictionary of Modern Slang, Cant, and Vulgar Words
      Half-a-crown is known as an alderman, half a bull, half a tusheroon, and a madza caroon; whilst a crown piece, or five shillings, may be called either a bull, or a caroon, or a cartwheel, or a coachwheel, or a thick-un, or a tusheroon.
  10. (Britain) Clipping of bullseye.
    • 1926, T.E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom, New York: Anchor (1991), p. 219:
      A second good game was to cannon one galloping camel with another, and crash it into a near tree. Either the tree went down (valley trees in the light Hejaz soil were notably unstable things) or the rider was scratched and torn; or, best of all, he was swept quite out of his saddle, and left impaled on a thorny branch, if not dropped violently to the ground. This counted as a bull, and was very popular with everyone but him.
    1. (military, firearms) The central portion of a target, inside the inner and magpie.
  11. (Philadelphia, slang) A man or boy (derived from the Philadelphia English pronunciation of “boy”, which is practically a homophone of “bull”)
  12. (uncountable, informal, euphemistic, slang) Clipping of bullshit.
  13. A man who has sex with another man’s wife or girlfriend with the consent of both.
    • 2018 ‘Stag’ men love watching other guys have sex with their wives… but it’s not cuckolding
      The Vixen, often known as ‘Hotwife’, has sex with the encouragement of her husband or boyfriend with the Bull (that’s the guy who is servicing her). Another scenario is that the Vixen has sex with a Bull outside of the couple’s shared abode. Then she comes home and recounts all the details in a blow-by-blow description to turn the Stag on.
  14. (obsolete) A drink made by pouring water into a cask that previously held liquor.
Synonyms
  • (cattle): gentleman cow (obsolete, euphemistic)
  • (slang: male person): guy, dude, bro, cat
  • (slang: policeman): cop, copper, pig (derogatory), rozzer (British). See also Thesaurus:police officer
Antonyms
  • (finance: investor who sells in anticipation of a fall in prices): bear
Coordinate terms
  • cow, ox, calf, steer
Derived terms
  • Banbury story of a cock and a bull
Translations

Adjective

bull (not comparable)

  1. Large and strong, like a bull.
    • Synonyms: beefy, hunky, robust
    • Antonyms: feeble, puny, weak
  2. (of large mammals) adult male
    Synonym: male
    Antonym: female
  3. (finance) Of a market in which prices are rising (compare bear)
    Antonym: bear
  4. stupid
    Synonym: stupid
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

bull (third-person singular simple present bulls, present participle bulling, simple past and past participle bulled)

  1. (intransitive) To force oneself (in a particular direction).
    He bulled his way in.
  2. (intransitive) To be in heat; to manifest sexual desire as cows do.
  3. (finance, transitive) To endeavour to raise the market price of.
    to bull railroad bonds
  4. (finance, transitive) To endeavour to raise prices in.
    to bull the market

Derived terms

(terms derived from the adj., noun, or verb bull (etymology 1)):

Translations

Etymology 2

Middle English bulle, from Old French bulle, from Latin bulla, from Gaulish. Doublet of bull (bubble) and bulla.

Noun

bull (plural bulls)

  1. A papal bull, an official document or edict from the Pope.
  2. A seal affixed to a document, especially a document from the Pope.
Translations

Verb

bull (third-person singular simple present bulls, present participle bulling, simple past and past participle bulled)

  1. (dated, 17th century) to publish in a Papal bull

Etymology 3

Middle English bull (falsehood), of unknown origin. Possibly related to Old French boul, boule, bole (fraud, deceit, trickery). Popularly associated with bullshit.

Noun

bull (uncountable)

  1. A lie.
  2. (euphemistic, informal) Nonsense.
Synonyms
  • (nonsense): See also Thesaurus:nonsense
Translations

Verb

bull (third-person singular simple present bulls, present participle bulling, simple past and past participle bulled)

  1. To mock; to cheat.
  2. (intransitive) To lie, to tell untruths.
  3. (Britain, military) To polish boots to a high shine.

Etymology 4

Old French boule (ball), from Latin bulla (round swelling), of Gaulish origin. Doublet of bull (papal bull) and bulla.

Noun

bull (plural bulls)

  1. (obsolete) A bubble. [16th century]

References


Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈbuʎ/
  • Homophone: vull
  • Rhymes: -uʎ

Etymology 1

From bullir.

Noun

bull m (plural bulls)

  1. boiling
  2. effervescence

Verb

bull

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of bullir
  2. second-person singular imperative form of bullir

Etymology 2

From Latin botulus (sausage).

Noun

bull m (plural bulls)

  1. A type of pork sausage.

Related terms

  • budell

Further reading

  • “bull” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Cimbrian

Etymology

Reduced form of bóol (well).

Adverb

bull (comparative péssor, superlative dar péste)

  1. (Sette Comuni) well

References

  • “bull” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

French

Etymology

From a clipped form of French bulldozer, from American English bulldozer.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bul/, /byl/

Noun

bull m (plural bulls)

  1. (construction) bulldozer

Synonyms

  • bulldozer
  • bouldozeur (with a Francized / Frenchified spelling)

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʏtl/
  • Rhymes: -ʏtl

Noun

bull n (genitive singular bulls, no plural)

  1. nonsense, gibberish

Declension

Synonyms

  • rugl
  • vitleysa
  • þvæla

Related terms

  • bulla (to talk nonsense, to boil)

Westrobothnian

Etymology 1

From Old Norse bolli, from Proto-Germanic *bullô.

Noun

bull m

  1. wooden bowl, lathed vessel, big bowl

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *bullǭ.

Noun

bull f

  1. loaf
Derived terms
  • bullsjiv
  • bullstommel
  • rågbull


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kɒp/
  • Rhymes: -ɒp
  • (General American) IPA(key): /kɑp/
  • Rhymes: -ɑp

Etymology 1

From Middle English coppe, from Old English *coppe, as in ātorcoppe (spider, literally venom head), from Old English copp (top, summit, head), from Proto-West Germanic *kopp, from Proto-Germanic *kuppaz (vault, round vessel, head), from Proto-Indo-European *gew- (to bend, curve). Cognate with Middle Dutch koppe, kobbe (spider). More at cobweb.

Noun

cop (plural cops)

  1. (obsolete) A spider.

Etymology 2

Origin uncertain. Perhaps from Middle English *coppen, *copen, from Old English copian (to plunder; pillage; steal); or possibly from Middle French caper (to capture), from Latin capiō (to seize, grasp); or possibly from Dutch kapen (to seize, to hijack), from Old Frisian kāpia (to buy). Compare also Middle English copen (to buy), from Middle Dutch copen.

Verb

cop (third-person singular simple present cops, present participle copping, simple past and past participle copped)

  1. (transitive, formerly dialect, now informal) To obtain, to purchase (as in drugs), to get hold of, to take.
    • 1995, Norman L. Russell, Doug Grad, Suicide Charlie: A Vietnam War Story (page 191)
      He sold me a bulging paper sack full of Cambodian Red for two dolla’ MPC. A strange experience, copping from a kid, but it was righteous weed.
    • 2005, Martin Torgoff, Can’t Find My Way Home, Simon & Schuster, page 10:
      Heroin appeared on the streets of our town for the first time, and Innie watched helplessly as his sixteen-year-old brother began taking the train to Harlem to cop smack.
  2. (transitive) To (be forced to) take; to receive; to shoulder; to bear, especially blame or punishment for a particular instance of wrongdoing.
  3. (transitive, trainspotting, slang) To see and record a railway locomotive for the first time.
  4. (transitive) To steal.
  5. (transitive) To adopt.
    No need to cop a ‘tude with me, junior.
  6. (transitive) To earn by bad behavior.
  7. (intransitive, usually with “to”, slang) to admit, especially to a crime.
    I already copped to the murder. What else do you want from me?
    Harold copped to being known as “Dirty Harry”.
  8. (transitive, slang) For a pimp to recruit a prostitute into the stable.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Short for copper (police officer), itself from the verb cop (to lay hold of) above, in reference to arresting criminals.

Noun

cop (plural cops)

  1. (informal) A police officer or prison guard.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:police officer
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English cop, coppe, from Old English cop, copp, from Proto-West Germanic *kopp, from Proto-Germanic *kuppaz (vault, basin, round object), from Proto-Indo-European *gew-. Cognate with Dutch kop, German Kopf.

Noun

cop (plural cops)

  1. (crafts) The ball of thread wound on to the spindle in a spinning machine.
  2. (obsolete) The top, summit, especially of a hill.
    • Cop they use to call / The tops of many hills.
  3. (obsolete) The crown (of the head); also the head itself. [14th-15th c.]
  4. A tube or quill upon which silk is wound.
  5. (architecture, military) A merlon.

References

  • Michael Quinion (2004), “Cop”, in Ballyhoo, Buckaroo, and Spuds: Ingenious Tales of Words and Their Origins, Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Books in association with Penguin Books, →ISBN.

See also

  • not much cop

Anagrams

  • CPO, OCP, OPC, PCO, POC, PoC

A-Pucikwar

Etymology

From Proto-Great Andamanese *cup

Noun

cop

  1. basket

References

  • Juliette Blevins, Linguistic clues to Andamanese pre-history: Understanding the North-South divide, pg. 20 (2009)

Catalan

Etymology

From Old Catalan colp, from Late Latin colpus (stroke), from earlier Latin colaphus.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈkɔp/

Noun

cop m (plural cops)

  1. hit, blow, strike
  2. time, occasion

Alternative forms

  • colp (dialectal)

Synonyms

  • (time, occasion): vegada, volta

Derived terms

  • copejar
  • cop de gràcia
  • cop baix
  • cop d’estat
  • cop d’ull
  • de cop
  • un cop

Further reading

  • “cop” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “cop” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “cop” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “cop” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Czech

Etymology

Borrowed from German Zopf.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈt͡sop]

Noun

cop m

  1. braid

Derived terms

  • copánek m
  • copatý m

Further reading

  • cop in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • cop in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

French

Etymology

A shortened form of copain.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔp/

Noun

cop m (plural cops)

  1. (informal) A friend, a pal.

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • cope, coppe

Etymology

From Old English cop, from Proto-West Germanic *kopp.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔp/

Noun

cop (plural coppes)

  1. summit (of a mountain or hill)
  2. top, tip, topmost part
  3. top of the head, crown
  4. head

Descendants

  • English: cop
  • Scots: cop, coppe
  • Yola: kappas (plural)
  • Welsh: copa

References

  • “cop, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-03-25.

Occitan

Noun

cop m (plural cops)

  1. Alternative spelling of còp

Old French

Noun

cop m (oblique plural cos, nominative singular cos, nominative plural cop)

  1. Alternative form of colp

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Middle Irish copp, borrowed from either Old English copp or Middle English copp, both meaning “top,” from Proto-West Germanic *kopp.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kʰɔhp/

Noun

cop m (genitive singular coip, plural coip)

  1. foam, froth

Derived terms

  • copach (foamy, frothy)
  • cop na mara (sea foam, spume)
  • copraich (fizz, verb)
  • cop ri do bheul (foaming at the mouth)

Verb

cop (past chop, future copidh, verbal noun copadh, past participle copte)

  1. capsize
  2. pour out, tip out
  3. foam, froth

Mutation


Slovak

Etymology

From German Zopf.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [t͡sop]

Noun

cop m (genitive singular copu, nominative plural copy, genitive plural copov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. braid

Declension

Synonyms

  • vrkoč

Derived terms

  • copík, copček

Further reading

  • cop in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

Volapük

Noun

cop (nominative plural cops)

  1. hoe (tool)

Declension


Welsh

Etymology

From Middle English coppe (spider), from Old English copp, from Proto-West Germanic *kopp (round object, orb).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔp/

Noun

cop m (plural copynnod or copynnau)

  1. (obsolete) spider
    Synonyms: copyn, corryn, pryf cop, pryf copyn

Usage notes

No longer found as an independent word, cop is now used as an element in other words for “spider”, such as copyn, pryf cop and pryf copyn and derived terms.

Derived terms

  • copyn (spider)
  • pryf cop (spider)
  • pryf copyn (spider)

Mutation

References

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “cop”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

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