bull vs copper what difference

what is difference between bull and copper

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʊl/
  • Rhymes: -ʊl

Etymology 1

From Middle English bole, bul, bule, from a conflation of Old English bula (bull, steer) and Old Norse boli, both from Proto-Germanic *bulô (bull), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰl̥no-, from *bʰel- (to blow, swell up). Cognate with West Frisian bolle, Dutch bul, German Low German Bull, German Bulle, Swedish bulla; also Old Irish ball (limb), Latin follis (bellows, leather bag), Thracian βόλινθος (vólinthos, wild bull), Albanian buall (buffalo) or related bolle (testicles), Ancient Greek φαλλός (phallós, penis).

Noun

bull (countable and uncountable, plural bulls)

  1. An adult male of domesticated cattle or oxen.
    1. Specifically, one that is uncastrated.
  2. A male of domesticated cattle or oxen of any age.
  3. Any adult male bovine.
  4. An adult male of certain large mammals, such as whales, elephants, camels and seals.
  5. A large, strong man.
  6. (finance) An investor who buys (commodities or securities) in anticipation of a rise in prices.
  7. (slang) A policeman.
    • The Bat—they called him the Bat. []. He’d never been in stir, the bulls had never mugged him, he didn’t run with a mob, he played a lone hand, and fenced his stuff so that even the fence couldn’t swear he knew his face.
    1. (US) Specifically, a policeman employed in a railroad yard.
  8. (LGBT, slang) An elderly lesbian.
  9. (Britain, historical, obsolete slang) A crown coin; its value, 5 shillings.
    • 1859, J.C. Hotten, A Dictionary of Modern Slang, Cant, and Vulgar Words
      Half-a-crown is known as an alderman, half a bull, half a tusheroon, and a madza caroon; whilst a crown piece, or five shillings, may be called either a bull, or a caroon, or a cartwheel, or a coachwheel, or a thick-un, or a tusheroon.
  10. (Britain) Clipping of bullseye.
    • 1926, T.E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom, New York: Anchor (1991), p. 219:
      A second good game was to cannon one galloping camel with another, and crash it into a near tree. Either the tree went down (valley trees in the light Hejaz soil were notably unstable things) or the rider was scratched and torn; or, best of all, he was swept quite out of his saddle, and left impaled on a thorny branch, if not dropped violently to the ground. This counted as a bull, and was very popular with everyone but him.
    1. (military, firearms) The central portion of a target, inside the inner and magpie.
  11. (Philadelphia, slang) A man or boy (derived from the Philadelphia English pronunciation of “boy”, which is practically a homophone of “bull”)
  12. (uncountable, informal, euphemistic, slang) Clipping of bullshit.
  13. A man who has sex with another man’s wife or girlfriend with the consent of both.
    • 2018 ‘Stag’ men love watching other guys have sex with their wives… but it’s not cuckolding
      The Vixen, often known as ‘Hotwife’, has sex with the encouragement of her husband or boyfriend with the Bull (that’s the guy who is servicing her). Another scenario is that the Vixen has sex with a Bull outside of the couple’s shared abode. Then she comes home and recounts all the details in a blow-by-blow description to turn the Stag on.
  14. (obsolete) A drink made by pouring water into a cask that previously held liquor.
Synonyms
  • (cattle): gentleman cow (obsolete, euphemistic)
  • (slang: male person): guy, dude, bro, cat
  • (slang: policeman): cop, copper, pig (derogatory), rozzer (British). See also Thesaurus:police officer
Antonyms
  • (finance: investor who sells in anticipation of a fall in prices): bear
Coordinate terms
  • cow, ox, calf, steer
Derived terms
  • Banbury story of a cock and a bull
Translations

Adjective

bull (not comparable)

  1. Large and strong, like a bull.
    • Synonyms: beefy, hunky, robust
    • Antonyms: feeble, puny, weak
  2. (of large mammals) adult male
    Synonym: male
    Antonym: female
  3. (finance) Of a market in which prices are rising (compare bear)
    Antonym: bear
  4. stupid
    Synonym: stupid
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

bull (third-person singular simple present bulls, present participle bulling, simple past and past participle bulled)

  1. (intransitive) To force oneself (in a particular direction).
    He bulled his way in.
  2. (intransitive) To be in heat; to manifest sexual desire as cows do.
  3. (finance, transitive) To endeavour to raise the market price of.
    to bull railroad bonds
  4. (finance, transitive) To endeavour to raise prices in.
    to bull the market

Derived terms

(terms derived from the adj., noun, or verb bull (etymology 1)):

Translations

Etymology 2

Middle English bulle, from Old French bulle, from Latin bulla, from Gaulish. Doublet of bull (bubble) and bulla.

Noun

bull (plural bulls)

  1. A papal bull, an official document or edict from the Pope.
  2. A seal affixed to a document, especially a document from the Pope.
Translations

Verb

bull (third-person singular simple present bulls, present participle bulling, simple past and past participle bulled)

  1. (dated, 17th century) to publish in a Papal bull

Etymology 3

Middle English bull (falsehood), of unknown origin. Possibly related to Old French boul, boule, bole (fraud, deceit, trickery). Popularly associated with bullshit.

Noun

bull (uncountable)

  1. A lie.
  2. (euphemistic, informal) Nonsense.
Synonyms
  • (nonsense): See also Thesaurus:nonsense
Translations

Verb

bull (third-person singular simple present bulls, present participle bulling, simple past and past participle bulled)

  1. To mock; to cheat.
  2. (intransitive) To lie, to tell untruths.
  3. (Britain, military) To polish boots to a high shine.

Etymology 4

Old French boule (ball), from Latin bulla (round swelling), of Gaulish origin. Doublet of bull (papal bull) and bulla.

Noun

bull (plural bulls)

  1. (obsolete) A bubble. [16th century]

References


Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈbuʎ/
  • Homophone: vull
  • Rhymes: -uʎ

Etymology 1

From bullir.

Noun

bull m (plural bulls)

  1. boiling
  2. effervescence

Verb

bull

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of bullir
  2. second-person singular imperative form of bullir

Etymology 2

From Latin botulus (sausage).

Noun

bull m (plural bulls)

  1. A type of pork sausage.

Related terms

  • budell

Further reading

  • “bull” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Cimbrian

Etymology

Reduced form of bóol (well).

Adverb

bull (comparative péssor, superlative dar péste)

  1. (Sette Comuni) well

References

  • “bull” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

French

Etymology

From a clipped form of French bulldozer, from American English bulldozer.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bul/, /byl/

Noun

bull m (plural bulls)

  1. (construction) bulldozer

Synonyms

  • bulldozer
  • bouldozeur (with a Francized / Frenchified spelling)

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʏtl/
  • Rhymes: -ʏtl

Noun

bull n (genitive singular bulls, no plural)

  1. nonsense, gibberish

Declension

Synonyms

  • rugl
  • vitleysa
  • þvæla

Related terms

  • bulla (to talk nonsense, to boil)

Westrobothnian

Etymology 1

From Old Norse bolli, from Proto-Germanic *bullô.

Noun

bull m

  1. wooden bowl, lathed vessel, big bowl

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *bullǭ.

Noun

bull f

  1. loaf
Derived terms
  • bullsjiv
  • bullstommel
  • rågbull


English

Pronunciation

  • (General Australian) enPR: kŏp’ə, IPA(key): /ˈkɔp.ə/
  • (UK) enPR: kŏp’ə, IPA(key): /ˈkɒp.ə/
  • (US) enPR: kä’pər, IPA(key): /ˈkɑ.pɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒpə(r)

Etymology 1

From Middle English coper, from Old English coper, copor (copper), from Late Latin cuprum (copper), contraction of Latin aes Cyprium (literally Cyprian brass), from Ancient Greek Κύπρος (Kúpros, Cyprus). Cognate with Dutch koper (copper), German Kupfer (copper), Icelandic kopar (copper).

Noun

copper (countable and uncountable, plural coppers)

  1. (uncountable) A reddish-brown, malleable, ductile metallic element with high electrical and thermal conductivity, symbol Cu, and atomic number 29.
  2. The reddish-brown colour/color of copper.
  3. (countable, dated) Any of various specialized items that are made of copper, where the use of copper is either traditional or vital to the function of the item.
    • 1885, General Rules and Regulations Applicable to All Employes of the Chicago and Grand Trunk Railway Company:
      Coppers are generally good for a year, if the battery is carefully attended []
    • 1890, The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 22, p. 83:
      Some coppers come already tinned. I didn’t buy mine, so they surely were not tinned.
    • 1907, “Instructions for the Care of Callaud Batteries” in Journal of the Telegraph, vol. XL:
      Coppers are not consumed, and their life depends largely on the manner in which they are used.
    1. (countable) A copper coin, typically of a small denomination, such as a penny.
      • “I don’t want to spoil any comparison you are going to make,” said Jim, “but I was at Winchester and New College.” ¶ “That will do,” said Mackenzie. “I was dragged up at the workhouse school till I was twelve. Then I ran away and sold papers in the streets, and anything else that I could pick up a few coppers by—except steal. [].”
    2. (Britain, Australia, dated) A large pot, often used for heating water or washing clothes over a fire. In Australasia at least, it could also be a fixed installation made of copper, with a fire underneath and its own chimney. Generally made redundant by the advent of the washing machine.
      • 1797, Dyeing, article in Colin Macfarquhar, George Gleig (editors), Encyclopædia Britannica: or, A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and Miscellaneous Literature, Volume 6, Part 1 p.207:
        When the water in the copper boils, the arsenic and tartar, well pounded, is put into it, and kept boiling till the liquor is reduced to about half.
      • 2000, Christopher Christie, The British Country House in the Eighteenth Century, p. 266:
        The wet laundry’s stove had a long vent in the ceiling which helped to release the steam from the coppers in which the clothes and bed linen were boiled.
  4. (entomology) Any of various lycaenid butterflies with copper-coloured upperwings, especially those of the genera Lycaena and Paralucia.
Synonyms
  • (colour): chestnut, russet
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Adjective

copper (comparative more copper, superlative most copper)

  1. Made of copper.
  2. Having the reddish-brown colour/color of copper.
    • 1798, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
      All in a hot and copper sky,
      The bloody Sun, at noon,
      Right up above the mast did stand,
      No bigger than the Moon.
Synonyms
  • (made of copper): coppern (archaic)
  • (having the colour/color of copper): coppery
Translations

Verb

copper (third-person singular simple present coppers, present participle coppering, simple past and past participle coppered)

  1. To sheathe or coat with copper.
Translations

See also

Etymology 2

From cop (to take, capture, seize) +‎ -er (agent suffix).

Noun

copper (plural coppers)

  1. (slang, law enforcement) A police officer.
Synonyms
  • (policeman): police officer, constable, cop, see also Thesaurus:police officer
Derived terms
  • bent copper
Related terms
  • cop
Translations

Further reading

  • David Barthelmy (1997–2021), “Copper”, in Webmineral Mineralogy Database.
  • “copper” in Mindat.org, Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, 2000–2021.

Middle English

Noun

copper

  1. Alternative form of coper

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