bullock vs steer what difference

what is difference between bullock and steer

English

Etymology

From Middle English bullok, from Old English bulluc, corresponding to bull +‎ -ock (diminutive suffix). Compare Middle Dutch boelekijn (bullock).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʊlək/

Noun

bullock (plural bullocks)

  1. (archaic) A young bull.
    • And he brought the bullock for the sin offering: and Aaron and his sons laid their hands upon the head of the bullock for the sin offering.
  2. A castrated bull; an ox.

Derived terms

  • bullocky
  • Gundaroo bullock

Translations

Verb

bullock (third-person singular simple present bullocks, present participle bullocking, simple past and past participle bullocked)

  1. To bully.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, p. 47:
      Yes, you villain, you have defiled my own bed, you have; and then you have charged me with bullocking you into owning the truth.
    • 2017, podcast “Untold – The Daniel Morgan Murder”, episode “Master of the Dark Arts”, from minute 11:18
      So you never knew when you were gonna fall foul of a furious bullocking. So it became a case of bullocking management, basically. You know, how can I stave off the stress and the bullying for another few days.


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɪə(ɹ)/, enPR: stĭə(r)
  • Rhymes: -ɪə(r)

Etymology 1

From Middle English steeren, steren, stiren, sturen, steoren, from Old English stēoran, stīeran, stȳran (to steer; guide a vessel), from Proto-West Germanic *stiurijan (to steer), from Proto-Germanic *stiurijaną (to steer).

The noun is from Middle English steere, stere, steor, from Old English stēor, stȳr (steering; guidance; direction). Compare Dutch stuur, German Steuer, Icelandic stýri.

Verb

steer (third-person singular simple present steers, present participle steering, simple past and past participle steered)

  1. (intransitive) To guide the course of a vessel, vehicle, aircraft etc. (by means of a device such as a rudder, paddle, or steering wheel).
  2. (transitive) To guide the course of a vessel, vehicle, aircraft etc. (by means of a device such as a rudder, paddle, or steering wheel).
  3. (intransitive) To be directed and governed; to take a direction, or course; to obey the helm.
  4. (transitive) To direct a group of animals.
  5. (transitive) To maneuver or manipulate a person or group into a place or course of action.
  6. (transitive) To direct a conversation.
  7. To conduct oneself; to take or pursue a course of action.
  8. (transitive) To direct or send an object into a specific place
Translations
See also
  • steering wheel
  • torque steer

Noun

steer (plural steers)

  1. (informal) A suggestion about a course of action.
  2. (obsolete) A helmsman; a pilot.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
Derived terms
  • steerless
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English stere, steer, ster, steor, from Old English stēor (a young bull or cow; steer), from Proto-Germanic *steuraz (bull; steer), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)táwros (wild bull; aurochs). Cognate with Dutch stier, German Stier, Icelandic stjór, Latin taurus (bull), Greek ταύρος (távros). Doublet of tur.

Noun

steer (plural steers)

  1. The castrated male of cattle, especially one raised for beef production.
    • 1913, Willa Cather, O Pioneers!, chapter 2
      He counted the cattle over and over. It diverted him to speculate as to how much weight each of the steers would probably put on by spring.
Synonyms
  • ox
Hypernyms
  • cattle
Hyponyms
  • stirk, bullock
Coordinate terms
  • bull, calf, cow
Translations

Verb

steer (third-person singular simple present steers, present participle steering, simple past and past participle steered)

  1. (transitive) To castrate (a male calf).
Translations

Anagrams

  • Ester, Reset, Trees, ester, estre, re-est., reest, reset, retes, seter, stere, teers, teres, terse, trees

Scots

Etymology

From Old English styrian

Noun

steer

  1. stir

Anagrams

  • Ester, Reset, ester, estre, re-est., reest, reset, retes, seter, stere, terse, trees

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