bully vs tough what difference

what is difference between bully and tough

English

Etymology

From 1530, as a term of endearment, probably a diminutive ( +‎ -y) of Dutch boel (lover; brother), from Middle Dutch boel, boele (brother; lover), from Old Dutch *buolo, from Proto-Germanic *bōlô (compare Middle Low German bôle (brother), Middle High German buole (brother; close relative; close relation) (whence German Buhle (lover)), Old English Bōla, Bōlla (personal name), diminutive of expressive *bō- (brother, father). Compare also Latvian bālinš (brother). More at boy.

The term acquired negative senses during the 17th century; first ‘noisy, blustering fellow’ then ‘a person who is cruel to others’. Possibly influenced by bull (male cattle) or via the ‘prostitute’s minder’ sense. The positive senses are dated, but survive in phrases such as bully pulpit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʊli/
  • Rhymes: -ʊli

Noun

bully (countable and uncountable, plural bullies)

  1. A person who is intentionally physically or emotionally cruel to others, especially to those whom they perceive as being vulnerable or of less power or privilege. [from late 17th c.]
  2. A noisy, blustering, tyrannical person, more insolent than courageous; one who is threatening and quarrelsome.
  3. A hired thug.
    • 1849, John McLean, Notes of a Twenty-Five Years’ Service in the Hudson’s Bay Territory, pp. 42-3:
      Mr. Fisher returned from town… he had learnt that our opponents intended to shift the scene of operations to the Chats… We understood that they had hired two bullies for the purpose of deciding the matter par voie de fait. Mr Fisher hired two of the same description, who were supposed to be more than a match for the opposition party.
    Synonyms: henchman, thug
  4. A sex worker’s minder.
    Synonyms: pimp; see also Thesaurus:pimp
    • 2009, Dan Cruikshank, Secret History of Georgian London, Random House, p. 473:
      The Proclamation Society and the Society for the Suppression of Vice were more concerned with obscene literature […] than with hands-on street battles with prostitutes and their bullies […].
  5. (uncountable) Bully beef.
  6. (obsolete) A brisk, dashing fellow.
  7. The small scrum in the Eton College field game.
  8. Various small freshwater or brackishwater fish of the family Eleotridae; sleeper goby.
  9. (obsolete or dialectal, Ireland and Northern England) An (eldest) brother; a fellow workman; comrade
  10. (dialectal) A companion; mate (male or female).
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:friend
  11. (obsolete) A darling, sweetheart (male or female).
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:sweetheart
  12. (field hockey) A standoff between two players from the opposing teams, who repeatedly hit each other’s hockey sticks and then attempt to acquire the ball, as a method of resuming the game in certain circumstances. Also called bully-off.
  13. (mining) A miner’s hammer.

Translations

Verb

bully (third-person singular simple present bullies, present participle bullying, simple past and past participle bullied)

  1. (transitive) To intimidate (someone) as a bully.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:intimidate
  2. (transitive) To act aggressively towards.
    Synonyms: push around, ride roughshod over

Translations

Adjective

bully (comparative bullier, superlative bulliest)

  1. (US, slang) Very good.
    Synonyms: excellent; see also Thesaurus:excellent
    • 1916, The Independent (volumes 35-36, page 6)
      She is a bully woman, not only a good mother, but a wonderful in-law
  2. (slang, obsolete) Jovial and blustering.
    Synonym: dashing
    • 1597, William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor Act II, scene iii:

Derived terms

  • bully boy
  • bully pulpit

Translations

Interjection

bully

  1. (often followed by for) Well done!
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:well done

Translations

Further reading

  • bully on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References


Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English bully, itself a derivation of Dutch boel (lover; brother).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbu.li/
  • Hyphenation: bul‧ly

Noun

bully m (plural bully’s)

  1. (field hockey) bully (way of resuming the game with a standoff between two opposing players who repeatedly hit each other’s sticks, then try to gain possession of the ball)

Spanish

Noun

bully m (plural bullys or bullies or bully)

  1. bully


English

Etymology

From Middle English tough, towgh, tou, toȝ, from Old English tōh (tough, tenacious, holding fast together; pliant; sticky, glutinous, clammy), from Proto-West Germanic *tą̄h(ī), from Proto-Germanic *tanhuz (fitting; clinging; tenacious; tough), from Proto-Indo-European *denḱ- (to bite).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: tŭf, IPA(key): /tʌf/
  • Rhymes: -ʌf
  • Homophone: tuff

Adjective

tough (comparative tougher, superlative toughest)

  1. Strong and resilient; sturdy.
    The tent, made of tough canvas, held up to many abuses.
  2. (of food) Difficult to cut or chew.
    To soften a tough cut of meat, the recipe suggested simmering it for hours.
  3. Rugged or physically hardy.
    Only a tough species will survive in the desert.
  4. Stubborn.
    He had a reputation as a tough negotiator.
  5. (of weather etc) Harsh or severe.
  6. Rowdy or rough.
    A bunch of the tough boys from the wrong side of the tracks threatened him.
  7. (of questions, etc.) Difficult or demanding.
    This is a tough crowd.
  8. (material science) Undergoing plastic deformation before breaking.

Derived terms

Translations

Interjection

tough

  1. (slang) Used to indicate lack of sympathy
    If you don’t like it, tough!

Translations

Noun

tough (plural toughs)

  1. A person who obtains things by force; a thug or bully.

Translations

Verb

tough (third-person singular simple present toughs, present participle toughing, simple past and past participle toughed)

  1. To endure.
  2. To toughen.

Derived terms

  • tough out

Translations

Anagrams

  • ought

German

Etymology

From English tough; see also German taff.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /taf/

Adjective

tough (comparative tougher, superlative am toughsten or am toughesten)

  1. (slang) Alternative form of taff (tough; robust; assertive and not overly sensitive)

Declension

declension with am toughsten
declension with am toughesten

Further reading

  • “tough” in Duden online

Middle English

Noun

tough

  1. Alternative form of tow

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial