bum vs sponge what difference

what is difference between bum and sponge

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʌm/
  • Rhymes: -ʌm

Etymology 1

Attested since the 1300s, as Middle English bom (found in John Trevisa’s 1387 Translation of the ‘Polychronicon’ of Ranulph Higden, “his bom is oute”), of uncertain origin. Sometimes suggested to a shortening of botme, botom, bottum (bottom), but this is contradicted by the fact that bottom is not attested in reference to the buttocks until the late 1700s. Suggested by some old and modern references to be onomatopoeic. Compare also Old Irish, Scottish Gaelic bun (base, bottom).

Noun

bum (plural bums)

  1. The buttocks.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:buttocks
    • For quotations using this term, see Citations:bum.
  2. (informal, rare) The anus.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:anus
Usage notes
  • In Canada, bum is considered the most appropriate term when speaking to young children, as in Everyone please sit on your bum and we’ll read a story. In the United States, bum is not often used in this sense (though this may vary from dialect to dialect) except in conscious imitation of British English. The term butt is the most common term in North America except in professional contexts such as medical, legal, and scientific where buttocks is generally used or gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, etc. for the muscles specifically. Glutes is often used in sports medicine and bodybuilding. Ass (originally a dialectal variant of arse) is considered vulgar in North America, whereas backside, behind, and bottom are considered to be non-specific terms.
Translations

Verb

bum (third-person singular simple present bums, present participle bumming, simple past and past participle bummed)

  1. (Britain, transitive, colloquial) To sodomize; to engage in anal sex.

Interjection

bum

  1. (Britain) An expression of annoyance.
    • 2010, Jill Mansell, Sheer Mischief:
      Maxine tried hers. ‘Oh bum,’ she said crossly. ‘The sugar isn’t sugar. It’s salt.’

Derived terms

Etymology 2

1864, back-formation from bummer, from German Bummler (loafer), from bummeln (to loaf).

Noun

bum (plural bums)

  1. (US, Canada, colloquial, sometimes derogatory) A homeless person, usually a man.
    Synonyms: tramp, vagrant, wanderer, vagabond; see also Thesaurus:vagabond
  2. (US, Canada, Australia, colloquial) A lazy, incompetent, or annoying person, usually a man.
    Synonyms: loafer, bumpkin, footler; see also Thesaurus:idler
  3. (US, Canada, Australia, colloquial, sports) A player or racer who often performs poorly.
  4. (colloquial) A drinking spree.
    Synonyms: binge, bender
Translations

Verb

bum (third-person singular simple present bums, present participle bumming, simple past and past participle bummed)

  1. (transitive, colloquial) To ask someone to give one (something) for free; to beg for something.
    Synonyms: (British) cadge; see also Thesaurus:scrounge
  2. (intransitive, colloquial) To stay idle and unproductive, like a hobo or vagabond.
    Synonym: loiter
  3. (transitive, slang, Britain) To wet the end of a marijuana cigarette (spliff).
Translations

Adjective

bum (comparative bummer, superlative bummest)

  1. Of poor quality or highly undesirable.
  2. Unfair.
  3. Injured and without the possibility of full repair, defective.
    Synonym: (UK) duff
  4. Unpleasant or unhappy.
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:bum.
Translations

Derived terms

Etymology 3

Back-formation from bum out.

Verb

bum (third-person singular simple present bums, present participle bumming, simple past and past participle bummed)

  1. To depress; to make unhappy.

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “bum”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Etymology 4

See boom.

Noun

bum (plural bums)

  1. (dated) A humming noise.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Verb

bum (third-person singular simple present bums, present participle bumming, simple past and past participle bummed)

  1. (intransitive) To make a murmuring or humming sound.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jamieson to this entry?)

Etymology 5

Abbreviations.

Noun

bum (plural bums)

  1. (obsolete) A bumbailiff.
    • 1705, Bernard Mandeville, The Fable of the Bees:
      About her Chariot, and behind, / Were Sergeants, Bums of every kind, / Tip-staffs, and all those Officers, / That squeeze a Living out of Tears.

References

Anagrams

  • MBU, UMB, umb, umb-

Albanian

Etymology

From English boom with orthographic adaptation.

Noun

bum ?

  1. (economics) boom

Indonesian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbʊm]
  • Hyphenation: bum

Etymology 1

From Dutch slagboom (boom barrier, boom gate) or boom (beam, barrier, tree, pole), from Middle Dutch bôom, from Old Dutch bōm, from Proto-Germanic *baumaz. Doublet of bom.

Noun

bum (first-person possessive bumku, second-person possessive bummu, third-person possessive bumnya)

  1. boom barrier, boom gate
  2. (figuratively) customs.
    Synonyms: duane, pabean

Alternative forms

  • bom

Etymology 2

From English boom, onomatopoeic.

Noun

bum (first-person possessive bumku, second-person possessive bummu, third-person possessive bumnya)

  1. (economics, business) boom: a period of prosperity, growth, progress, or high market activity.

Further reading

  • “bum” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Irish

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

bum m (genitive singular bum, nominative plural bumanna)

  1. (sailing) boom

Declension

Synonyms

  • crann scóide
  • bumaile

Mutation


Mizo

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bum/

Verb

bum

  1. swindle
  2. cheat
  3. trick

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bum/

Interjection

bum

  1. boom! (sound of explosion)
  2. bang! (any brief, sharp, loud noise)

Portuguese

Interjection

bum!

  1. boom (sound of explosion)

Serbo-Croatian

Verb

bum (Cyrillic spelling бум)

  1. (Kajkavian) first-person singular future of biti

Spanish

Etymology

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbum/, [ˈbũm]

Interjection

¡bum!

  1. boom (used to suggest the sound of an explosion)
  2. boom (used to suggest something happening suddenly and unexpectedly)

See also

  • pum
  • pop

Transylvanian Saxon

Noun

bum m

  1. tree

References

  • Siebenbürger Sachsen

Volapük

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bum/

Noun

bum (nominative plural bums)

  1. act of building

Declension

Derived terms

  • bumäd
  • bumot

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales) IPA(key): /bɨ̞m/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /bɪm/

Numeral

bum

  1. Soft mutation of pum (five).

Mutation


English

Etymology

From Old English spunge, taken from Latin spongia, from Ancient Greek σπογγιά (spongiá), related to σπόγγος (spóngos).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: spŭnj, IPA(key): /spʌnd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌndʒ

Noun

sponge (countable and uncountable, plural sponges)

  1. (countable) Any of various marine invertebrates, mostly of the phylum Porifera, that have a porous skeleton often of silica.
    Synonyms: sea sponge, bath sponge, poriferan, porifer
  2. (countable) A piece of porous material used for washing (originally made from the invertebrates, now often made of plastic).
    Synonym: bath sponge
  3. (uncountable) A porous material such as sponges consist of.
  4. (informal) A heavy drinker.
    Synonyms: souse, swill-pot; see also Thesaurus:drunkard
  5. (countable, uncountable) A type of light cake.
    Synonym: sponge cake
  6. (countable, uncountable, Britain) A type of steamed pudding.
    Synonym: sponge pudding
  7. (slang) A person who takes advantage of the generosity of others (abstractly imagined to absorb or soak up the money or efforts of others like a sponge).
    Synonyms: freeloader, sponger; see also Thesaurus:scrounger
  8. A person who readily absorbs ideas.
    • 2014, Phoeve Hutchison, Are You Listening? Life Is Talking to You! (page 145)
      For this reason, we need to think of our children as sponges of information and watch their sources carefully. We also need to always model appropriate behaviour, as we are a constant source of new information.
  9. (countable) A form of contraception that is inserted vaginally; a contraceptive sponge.
  10. Any sponge-like substance.
    1. (baking) Dough before it is kneaded and formed into loaves, and after it is converted into a light, spongy mass by the agency of the yeast or leaven.
    2. Iron from the puddling furnace, in a pasty condition.
    3. Iron ore, in masses, reduced but not melted or worked.
  11. A mop for cleaning the bore of a cannon after a discharge. It consists of a cylinder of wood, covered with sheepskin with the wool on, or cloth with a heavy looped nap, and having a handle, or staff.
  12. The extremity, or point, of a horseshoe, corresponding to the heel.
  13. (slang) A nuclear power plant worker routinely exposed to radiation.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Hindi: स्पंज (spañj)
  • Japanese: スポンジ (suponji)
  • Korean: 스펀지 (seupeonji)
  • Pashto: سپنج(spanj)
  • Welsh: spynj

Translations

See also

  • foam

Verb

sponge (third-person singular simple present sponges, present participle sponging, simple past and past participle sponged)

  1. (intransitive, slang) To take advantage of the kindness of others.
  2. (transitive, intransitive with on or upon) To get by imposition; to scrounge.
    Synonym: blag
    • July 17 1735, Jonathan Swift, letter to Lord Ornery
      I am an utter stranger to the persons and places, except when half a score come to sponge on me every Sunday evening
  3. (transitive) To deprive (somebody) of something by imposition.
    • How came such multitudes of our nation [] to be sponged of their plate and their money?
  4. To clean, soak up, or dab with a sponge.
  5. To suck in, or imbibe, like a sponge.
  6. To wipe out with a sponge, as letters or writing; to efface; to destroy all trace of.
    • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
      Lett the eyes which have looked on Idols, sponge out their unlawfull acts
  7. (intransitive, baking) To be converted, as dough, into a light, spongy mass by the agency of yeast or leaven.
  8. (marine biology, of dolphins) To use a piece of wild sponge as a tool when foraging for food.

Translations

Further reading

  • sponge on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • pengos, pengős

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