bum vs tail what difference

what is difference between bum and tail

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʌm/
  • Rhymes: -ʌm

Etymology 1

Attested since the 1300s, as Middle English bom (found in John Trevisa’s 1387 Translation of the ‘Polychronicon’ of Ranulph Higden, “his bom is oute”), of uncertain origin. Sometimes suggested to a shortening of botme, botom, bottum (bottom), but this is contradicted by the fact that bottom is not attested in reference to the buttocks until the late 1700s. Suggested by some old and modern references to be onomatopoeic. Compare also Old Irish, Scottish Gaelic bun (base, bottom).

Noun

bum (plural bums)

  1. The buttocks.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:buttocks
    • For quotations using this term, see Citations:bum.
  2. (informal, rare) The anus.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:anus
Usage notes
  • In Canada, bum is considered the most appropriate term when speaking to young children, as in Everyone please sit on your bum and we’ll read a story. In the United States, bum is not often used in this sense (though this may vary from dialect to dialect) except in conscious imitation of British English. The term butt is the most common term in North America except in professional contexts such as medical, legal, and scientific where buttocks is generally used or gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, etc. for the muscles specifically. Glutes is often used in sports medicine and bodybuilding. Ass (originally a dialectal variant of arse) is considered vulgar in North America, whereas backside, behind, and bottom are considered to be non-specific terms.
Translations

Verb

bum (third-person singular simple present bums, present participle bumming, simple past and past participle bummed)

  1. (Britain, transitive, colloquial) To sodomize; to engage in anal sex.

Interjection

bum

  1. (Britain) An expression of annoyance.
    • 2010, Jill Mansell, Sheer Mischief:
      Maxine tried hers. ‘Oh bum,’ she said crossly. ‘The sugar isn’t sugar. It’s salt.’

Derived terms

Etymology 2

1864, back-formation from bummer, from German Bummler (loafer), from bummeln (to loaf).

Noun

bum (plural bums)

  1. (US, Canada, colloquial, sometimes derogatory) A homeless person, usually a man.
    Synonyms: tramp, vagrant, wanderer, vagabond; see also Thesaurus:vagabond
  2. (US, Canada, Australia, colloquial) A lazy, incompetent, or annoying person, usually a man.
    Synonyms: loafer, bumpkin, footler; see also Thesaurus:idler
  3. (US, Canada, Australia, colloquial, sports) A player or racer who often performs poorly.
  4. (colloquial) A drinking spree.
    Synonyms: binge, bender
Translations

Verb

bum (third-person singular simple present bums, present participle bumming, simple past and past participle bummed)

  1. (transitive, colloquial) To ask someone to give one (something) for free; to beg for something.
    Synonyms: (British) cadge; see also Thesaurus:scrounge
  2. (intransitive, colloquial) To stay idle and unproductive, like a hobo or vagabond.
    Synonym: loiter
  3. (transitive, slang, Britain) To wet the end of a marijuana cigarette (spliff).
Translations

Adjective

bum (comparative bummer, superlative bummest)

  1. Of poor quality or highly undesirable.
  2. Unfair.
  3. Injured and without the possibility of full repair, defective.
    Synonym: (UK) duff
  4. Unpleasant or unhappy.
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:bum.
Translations

Derived terms

Etymology 3

Back-formation from bum out.

Verb

bum (third-person singular simple present bums, present participle bumming, simple past and past participle bummed)

  1. To depress; to make unhappy.

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “bum”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Etymology 4

See boom.

Noun

bum (plural bums)

  1. (dated) A humming noise.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Verb

bum (third-person singular simple present bums, present participle bumming, simple past and past participle bummed)

  1. (intransitive) To make a murmuring or humming sound.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jamieson to this entry?)

Etymology 5

Abbreviations.

Noun

bum (plural bums)

  1. (obsolete) A bumbailiff.
    • 1705, Bernard Mandeville, The Fable of the Bees:
      About her Chariot, and behind, / Were Sergeants, Bums of every kind, / Tip-staffs, and all those Officers, / That squeeze a Living out of Tears.

References

Anagrams

  • MBU, UMB, umb, umb-

Albanian

Etymology

From English boom with orthographic adaptation.

Noun

bum ?

  1. (economics) boom

Indonesian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbʊm]
  • Hyphenation: bum

Etymology 1

From Dutch slagboom (boom barrier, boom gate) or boom (beam, barrier, tree, pole), from Middle Dutch bôom, from Old Dutch bōm, from Proto-Germanic *baumaz. Doublet of bom.

Noun

bum (first-person possessive bumku, second-person possessive bummu, third-person possessive bumnya)

  1. boom barrier, boom gate
  2. (figuratively) customs.
    Synonyms: duane, pabean

Alternative forms

  • bom

Etymology 2

From English boom, onomatopoeic.

Noun

bum (first-person possessive bumku, second-person possessive bummu, third-person possessive bumnya)

  1. (economics, business) boom: a period of prosperity, growth, progress, or high market activity.

Further reading

  • “bum” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Irish

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

bum m (genitive singular bum, nominative plural bumanna)

  1. (sailing) boom

Declension

Synonyms

  • crann scóide
  • bumaile

Mutation


Mizo

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bum/

Verb

bum

  1. swindle
  2. cheat
  3. trick

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bum/

Interjection

bum

  1. boom! (sound of explosion)
  2. bang! (any brief, sharp, loud noise)

Portuguese

Interjection

bum!

  1. boom (sound of explosion)

Serbo-Croatian

Verb

bum (Cyrillic spelling бум)

  1. (Kajkavian) first-person singular future of biti

Spanish

Etymology

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbum/, [ˈbũm]

Interjection

¡bum!

  1. boom (used to suggest the sound of an explosion)
  2. boom (used to suggest something happening suddenly and unexpectedly)

See also

  • pum
  • pop

Transylvanian Saxon

Noun

bum m

  1. tree

References

  • Siebenbürger Sachsen

Volapük

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bum/

Noun

bum (nominative plural bums)

  1. act of building

Declension

Derived terms

  • bumäd
  • bumot

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales) IPA(key): /bɨ̞m/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /bɪm/

Numeral

bum

  1. Soft mutation of pum (five).

Mutation


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: tāl, IPA(key): /teɪl/
  • Homophones: tale, tael
  • Rhymes: -eɪl

Etymology 1

From Middle English tail, tayl, teil, from Old English tæġl (tail), from Proto-Germanic *taglaz, *taglą (hair, fiber; hair of a tail), from Proto-Indo-European *doḱ- (hair of the tail), from Proto-Indo-European *deḱ- (to tear, fray, shred). Cognate with Scots tail (tail), Dutch teil (tail, haulm, blade), Low German Tagel (twisted scourge, whip of thongs and ropes; end of a rope), German Zagel (tail), dialectal Danish tavl (hair of the tail), Swedish tagel (hair of the tail, horsehair), Norwegian tagl (tail), Icelandic tagl (tail, horsetail, ponytail), Gothic ???????????????? (tagl, hair). In some senses, apparently by a generalization of the usual opposition between head and tail.

Noun

tail (plural tails)

  1. (anatomy) The caudal appendage of an animal that is attached to its posterior and near the anus.
  2. An object or part of an object resembling a tail in shape, such as the thongs on a cat-o’-nine-tails.
  3. The back, last, lower, or inferior part of anything.
  4. The feathers attached to the pygostyle of a bird.
  5. The tail-end of an object, e.g. the rear of an aircraft’s fuselage, containing the tailfin.
    • 1862, Ballou’s Dollar Monthly Magazine (volume 16, page 83)
      It was soon over, and the unmoved magistrate calmly ordained that Deborah Williams, Elizabeth and Faith Wilson, should be tied to a cart’s tail, and thus led through the principal streets of the town, receiving during their progress twenty lashes each, well laid on, upon the naked back.
  6. The rear structure of an aircraft, the empennage.
  7. (astronomy) The visible stream of dust and gases blown from a comet by the solar wind.
  8. The latter part of a time period or event, or (collectively) persons or objects represented in this part.
  9. (statistics) The part of a distribution most distant from the mode; as, a long tail.
  10. One who surreptitiously follows another.
  11. (cricket) The lower order of batsmen in the batting order, usually specialist bowlers.
  12. (typography) The lower loop of the letters in the Roman alphabet, as in g, q or y.
    Synonym: descender
  13. (chiefly in the plural) The side of a coin not bearing the head; normally the side on which the monetary value of the coin is indicated; the reverse.
  14. (mathematics) All the last terms of a sequence, from some term on.
  15. (now colloquial, chiefly US) The buttocks or backside.
    • 1499, John Skelton, The Bowge of Courte:
      By Goddis sydes, syns I her thyder broughte, / She hath gote me more money with her tayle / Than hath some shyppe that into Bordews sayle.
  16. (slang) The penis of a person or animal.
  17. (slang, uncountable) Sexual intercourse.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:copulation
  18. (kayaking) The stern; the back of the kayak.
  19. A train or company of attendants; a retinue.
  20. (anatomy) The distal tendon of a muscle.
  21. (entomology) A filamentous projection on the tornal section of each hind wing of certain butterflies.
  22. A downy or feathery appendage of certain achens, formed of the permanent elongated style.
  23. (surgery) A portion of an incision, at its beginning or end, which does not go through the whole thickness of the skin, and is more painful than a complete incision; called also tailing.
  24. One of the strips at the end of a bandage formed by splitting the bandage one or more times.
  25. (nautical) A rope spliced to the strap of a block, by which it may be lashed to anything.
  26. (music) The part of a note which runs perpendicularly upward or downward from the head; the stem.
  27. (mining) A tailing.
  28. (architecture) The bottom or lower portion of a member or part such as a slate or tile.
  29. (colloquial, dated) A tailcoat.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations
See also
  • caudal

Verb

tail (third-person singular simple present tails, present participle tailing, simple past and past participle tailed)

  1. (transitive) To follow and observe surreptitiously.
    Tail that car!
  2. (architecture) To hold by the end; said of a timber when it rests upon a wall or other support; with in or into
  3. (nautical) To swing with the stern in a certain direction; said of a vessel at anchor.
    This vessel tails downstream.
  4. To follow or hang to, like a tail; to be attached closely to, as that which can not be evaded.
    • Nevertheless his bond of two thousand pounds, wherewith he was tailed, continued uncancelled.
  5. To pull or draw by the tail.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Anglo-Norman, probably from a shortened form of entail.

Adjective

tail

  1. (law) Limited; abridged; reduced; curtailed.
    estate tail

Noun

tail

  1. (law) Limitation of inheritance to certain heirs.
    tail male — limitation to male heirs
    in tail — subject to such a limitation

Related terms

  • entail

References

Anagrams

  • ATLI, Ital, Ital., LIAT, LITA, Lita, TILA, Ta-li, Tila, alit, alti, ital, ital., lait, tali

Middle English

Noun

tail

  1. Alternative form of tayl

Welsh

Noun

tail m (plural teiliau)

  1. shit, dung

Derived terms

  • maer biswail

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