bum vs tramp what difference

what is difference between bum and tramp

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʌm/
  • Rhymes: -ʌm

Etymology 1

Attested since the 1300s, as Middle English bom (found in John Trevisa’s 1387 Translation of the ‘Polychronicon’ of Ranulph Higden, “his bom is oute”), of uncertain origin. Sometimes suggested to a shortening of botme, botom, bottum (bottom), but this is contradicted by the fact that bottom is not attested in reference to the buttocks until the late 1700s. Suggested by some old and modern references to be onomatopoeic. Compare also Old Irish, Scottish Gaelic bun (base, bottom).

Noun

bum (plural bums)

  1. The buttocks.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:buttocks
    • For quotations using this term, see Citations:bum.
  2. (informal, rare) The anus.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:anus
Usage notes
  • In Canada, bum is considered the most appropriate term when speaking to young children, as in Everyone please sit on your bum and we’ll read a story. In the United States, bum is not often used in this sense (though this may vary from dialect to dialect) except in conscious imitation of British English. The term butt is the most common term in North America except in professional contexts such as medical, legal, and scientific where buttocks is generally used or gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, etc. for the muscles specifically. Glutes is often used in sports medicine and bodybuilding. Ass (originally a dialectal variant of arse) is considered vulgar in North America, whereas backside, behind, and bottom are considered to be non-specific terms.
Translations

Verb

bum (third-person singular simple present bums, present participle bumming, simple past and past participle bummed)

  1. (Britain, transitive, colloquial) To sodomize; to engage in anal sex.

Interjection

bum

  1. (Britain) An expression of annoyance.
    • 2010, Jill Mansell, Sheer Mischief:
      Maxine tried hers. ‘Oh bum,’ she said crossly. ‘The sugar isn’t sugar. It’s salt.’

Derived terms

Etymology 2

1864, back-formation from bummer, from German Bummler (loafer), from bummeln (to loaf).

Noun

bum (plural bums)

  1. (US, Canada, colloquial, sometimes derogatory) A homeless person, usually a man.
    Synonyms: tramp, vagrant, wanderer, vagabond; see also Thesaurus:vagabond
  2. (US, Canada, Australia, colloquial) A lazy, incompetent, or annoying person, usually a man.
    Synonyms: loafer, bumpkin, footler; see also Thesaurus:idler
  3. (US, Canada, Australia, colloquial, sports) A player or racer who often performs poorly.
  4. (colloquial) A drinking spree.
    Synonyms: binge, bender
Translations

Verb

bum (third-person singular simple present bums, present participle bumming, simple past and past participle bummed)

  1. (transitive, colloquial) To ask someone to give one (something) for free; to beg for something.
    Synonyms: (British) cadge; see also Thesaurus:scrounge
  2. (intransitive, colloquial) To stay idle and unproductive, like a hobo or vagabond.
    Synonym: loiter
  3. (transitive, slang, Britain) To wet the end of a marijuana cigarette (spliff).
Translations

Adjective

bum (comparative bummer, superlative bummest)

  1. Of poor quality or highly undesirable.
  2. Unfair.
  3. Injured and without the possibility of full repair, defective.
    Synonym: (UK) duff
  4. Unpleasant or unhappy.
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:bum.
Translations

Derived terms

Etymology 3

Back-formation from bum out.

Verb

bum (third-person singular simple present bums, present participle bumming, simple past and past participle bummed)

  1. To depress; to make unhappy.

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “bum”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Etymology 4

See boom.

Noun

bum (plural bums)

  1. (dated) A humming noise.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Verb

bum (third-person singular simple present bums, present participle bumming, simple past and past participle bummed)

  1. (intransitive) To make a murmuring or humming sound.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jamieson to this entry?)

Etymology 5

Abbreviations.

Noun

bum (plural bums)

  1. (obsolete) A bumbailiff.
    • 1705, Bernard Mandeville, The Fable of the Bees:
      About her Chariot, and behind, / Were Sergeants, Bums of every kind, / Tip-staffs, and all those Officers, / That squeeze a Living out of Tears.

References

Anagrams

  • MBU, UMB, umb, umb-

Albanian

Etymology

From English boom with orthographic adaptation.

Noun

bum ?

  1. (economics) boom

Indonesian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbʊm]
  • Hyphenation: bum

Etymology 1

From Dutch slagboom (boom barrier, boom gate) or boom (beam, barrier, tree, pole), from Middle Dutch bôom, from Old Dutch bōm, from Proto-Germanic *baumaz. Doublet of bom.

Noun

bum (first-person possessive bumku, second-person possessive bummu, third-person possessive bumnya)

  1. boom barrier, boom gate
  2. (figuratively) customs.
    Synonyms: duane, pabean

Alternative forms

  • bom

Etymology 2

From English boom, onomatopoeic.

Noun

bum (first-person possessive bumku, second-person possessive bummu, third-person possessive bumnya)

  1. (economics, business) boom: a period of prosperity, growth, progress, or high market activity.

Further reading

  • “bum” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Irish

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

bum m (genitive singular bum, nominative plural bumanna)

  1. (sailing) boom

Declension

Synonyms

  • crann scóide
  • bumaile

Mutation


Mizo

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bum/

Verb

bum

  1. swindle
  2. cheat
  3. trick

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bum/

Interjection

bum

  1. boom! (sound of explosion)
  2. bang! (any brief, sharp, loud noise)

Portuguese

Interjection

bum!

  1. boom (sound of explosion)

Serbo-Croatian

Verb

bum (Cyrillic spelling бум)

  1. (Kajkavian) first-person singular future of biti

Spanish

Etymology

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbum/, [ˈbũm]

Interjection

¡bum!

  1. boom (used to suggest the sound of an explosion)
  2. boom (used to suggest something happening suddenly and unexpectedly)

See also

  • pum
  • pop

Transylvanian Saxon

Noun

bum m

  1. tree

References

  • Siebenbürger Sachsen

Volapük

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bum/

Noun

bum (nominative plural bums)

  1. act of building

Declension

Derived terms

  • bumäd
  • bumot

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales) IPA(key): /bɨ̞m/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /bɪm/

Numeral

bum

  1. Soft mutation of pum (five).

Mutation


English

Etymology

From Middle English trampen (to walk heavily), from Middle Low German trampen (to stamp) (trampeln (to walk with heavy steps), see trample), or Middle Dutch trampen (to stamp), from Proto-West Germanic *trampan (to step), from an extension of Proto-Indo-European *dr-, *drem-, *dreh₂-. Doublet of tremp.

The noun sense “vagabond” evolved from the sense “one who tramps”, from 1664. The sense “ship” is from about 1880, sense “promiscuous woman” is from 1922.

Cognate to Dutch trampen (to stamp, kick, step), dialectal German trampen (to step, walk, tread), whence commoner German trampeln (to trample). Probably related to trap.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: trămp, IPA(key): /tɹæmp/
  • Rhymes: -æmp

Noun

tramp (plural tramps)

  1. (sometimes derogatory) A homeless person; a vagabond.
    • [S]he had thought to discover a burglar of one or another accepted type—either a dashing cracksman in full-blown evening dress, lithe, polished, pantherish, or a common yegg, a red-eyed, unshaven burly brute in the rags and tatters of a tramp.
    Synonyms: bum, hobo, vagabond

    See also Thesaurus:vagabond
  2. (derogatory) A disreputable, promiscuous woman; a slut.
    See also Thesaurus:promiscuous woman
  3. Any ship which does not have a fixed schedule or published ports of call.
    • 1888, Robert Louis Stevenson, The Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson; Volume 2, chapter 9:
      I was so happy on board that ship, I could not have believed it possible. We had the beastliest weather, and many discomforts; but the mere fact of its being a tramp-ship gave us many comforts; we could cut about with the men and officers, stay in the wheel-house, discuss all manner of things, and really be a little at sea.
    • 1919, Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, chapter 10:
      Then I think I conceive of other worlds and vast structures that pass us by, within a few miles, without the slightest desire to communicate, quite as tramp vessels pass many islands without particularizing one from another.
    • 1924, George Sutherland, Texas Transport Terminal Company v. New Orleans: Dissent Brandeis:
      Some of these are regular ocean liners; others are casual tramp ships.
    • 1960, Lobsang Rampa, The Rampa Story, chapter Six:
      “Hrrumph,” said the Mate. “Get into uniform right away, we must have discipline here.” With that he stalked off as if he were First Mate on one of the Queens instead of just on a dirty, rusty old tramp ship.
    see Wikipedia:tramp steamer
  4. (Australia, New Zealand) A long walk, possibly of more than one day, in a scenic or wilderness area.
    • 1968, John W. Allen, It Happened in Southern Illinois, page 75:
      The starting place for the tramp is reached over a gravel road that begins on Route 3 about a mile south of Gorham spur.
    • 2005, Paul Smitz, Australia & New Zealand on a Shoestring, Lonely Planet, page 734:
      Speaking of knockout panoramas, if you′re fit then consider doing the taxing, winding, 8km tramp up Mt Roy (1578m; five to six hours return), start 6km from Wanaka on Mt Aspiring Rd.
    • 2006, Marc Llewellyn, Lee Mylne, Frommer′s Australia from $60 a Day, page 186:
      The 1½-hour tramp passes through banksia, gum, and wattle forests, with spectacular views of peaks and valleys.
    Synonyms: bushwalk, hike, ramble, trek
  5. Clipping of trampoline, especially a very small one.
  6. (in apposition) Of objects, stray and intrusive and unwanted
    • “Your last delivery of copper ore contained half a hundredweight of tramp metal.”
  7. A metal plate worn by diggers under the hollow of the foot to save the shoe.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

tramp (third-person singular simple present tramps, present participle tramping, simple past and past participle tramped)

  1. To walk with heavy footsteps.
  2. To walk for a long time (usually through difficult terrain).
    We tramped through the woods for hours before we found the main path again.
  3. To hitchhike.
  4. (transitive) To tread upon forcibly and repeatedly; to trample.
  5. (transitive) To travel or wander through.
    to tramp the country
  6. (transitive, Scotland) To cleanse, as clothes, by treading upon them in water.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jamieson to this entry?)

Derived terms

  • trample
  • tromp

Translations

References

  • tramp in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

tramp

  1. imperative of trampe

Polish

Etymology

From English tramp.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tramp/

Noun

tramp m pers

  1. tramp
    Synonyms: wędrowiec, włóczykij, obieżyświat

Declension

Derived terms

  • (noun) trampek

Noun

tramp m inan

  1. (nautical) tramp steamer

Declension

Derived terms

  • (adjectives) trampowy, trampowski

Related terms

  • (noun) tramping
  • (adjective) trampingowy

Further reading

  • tramp in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • tramp in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle Low German trampen, from Old Saxon *trampan, from Proto-West Germanic *trampan (to step).

Noun

tramp c or n

  1. a step, a footprint n
  2. (uncountable) the sound of feet (boots, shoes, hooves) walking n
    först då blir lyckan riktigt stor, när trampet hörs av små, små skor

    at last your luck will be complete, when you hear the tripping of tiny shoes (traditional wedding congratulation telegram)
  3. a tramp, a cargo ship without fixed routes c

Declension

Related terms

  • (steps, walking): stöveltramp, trampa
  • (ship): trampfartyg

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