bump vs find what difference

what is difference between bump and find

English

Etymology

From Early Modern English bump (a shock, blow from a collision”, also “to make a heavy, hollow sound, boom), probably of North Germanic origin. Compare Danish bump (a thump), Danish bumpe (to thump), Old Danish bumpe (to strike with a clenched fist). Apparently related to Middle English bumben, bummen (to make a hollow noise), Dutch bommen (to hum, buzz), German bummen (to hum, buzz), Icelandic bumba (drum), probably of imitative origin. More at bum, bumble. Compare also bomb.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʌmp/
  • Rhymes: -ʌmp

Noun

bump (countable and uncountable, plural bumps)

  1. A light blow or jolting collision.
  2. The sound of such a collision.
  3. A protuberance on a level surface.
  4. A swelling on the skin caused by illness or injury.
  5. (obsolete) One of the protuberances on the cranium which, in phrenology, are associated with distinct faculties or affections of the mind. Also (dated, metonymically) the faculty itself
    • c.1845 Thomas MacNevin, cited in Charles Gavan Duffy (1896) Young Ireland: A Fragment of Irish History, 1840-45; final revision (London: T.F. Unwin) Vol.II p.100:
      Our task is to elevate the character of the people, raising up, in fact, their bump of self-esteem and suppressing the bumps of servility and fury.
  6. (rowing) The point, in a race in which boats are spaced apart at the start, at which a boat begins to overtake the boat ahead.
  7. The swollen abdomen of a pregnant woman.
  8. (Internet) A post in an Internet forum thread made in order to raise the thread’s profile by returning it to the top of the list of active threads.
  9. A temporary increase in a quantity, as shown in a graph.
  10. (slang) A dose of a drug such as ketamine or cocaine, when snorted recreationally.
  11. The noise made by the bittern; a boom.
  12. (preceded by definite article) A disco dance in which partners rhythmically bump each other’s hips together.
  13. In skipping, a single jump over two consecutive turns of the rope.
  14. (uncountable) A coarse cotton fabric.
  15. A training match for a fighting dog.
  16. (snooker, slang) The jaw of either of the middle pockets.
  17. (US, slang, uncountable) Music, especially played over speakers at loud volume with strong bass frequency response.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

bump (third-person singular simple present bumps, present participle bumping, simple past and past participle bumped)

  1. To knock against or run into with a jolt.
  2. To move up or down by a step; displace.
  3. (Internet) To post in an Internet forum thread in order to raise the thread’s profile by returning it to the top of the list of active threads.
  4. (chemistry, of a superheated liquid) To suddenly boil, causing movement of the vessel and loss of liquid.
  5. (transitive) To move (a booked passenger) to a later flight because of earlier delays or cancellations.
    • 2005, Lois Jones, EasyJet: the story of Britain’s biggest low-cost airline (page 192)
      Easyjet said the compensation package for passengers bumped off flights was ‘probably the most flawed piece of European legislation in recent years’ []
  6. (transitive) To move the time of (a scheduled event).
    • 2010, Nancy Conner, Matthew MacDonald, Office 2010: The Missing Manual, p. 332:
      A colleague emails with news that her 4:30 meeting got bumped to 3:30.
  7. (transitive) To pick (a lock) with a repeated striking motion that dislodges the pins.
  8. (intransitive, archaic) To make a loud, heavy, or hollow noise; to boom.
    • as a bittern bumps within a reed
  9. (printing, dated) To spread out material so as to fill any desired number of pages.
  10. (slang, transitive) To assassinate; to bump off.
    • 1944, William Faulkner, Leigh Brackett, Jules Furthman, The Big Sleep (screenplay)
      You know about the night the kid bumped Brody?

Derived terms

Translations

Interjection

bump

  1. (Internet) Posted in an Internet forum thread in order to raise the thread’s profile by returning it to the top of the list of active threads.

Danish

Etymology

Onomatopoeic, compare English bump.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bomˀp/, [ˈb̥ɔmˀb̥]
  • Homophone: bomb

Noun

bump n (singular definite bumpet, plural indefinite bump)

  1. thud
  2. jolt
  3. road hump

Inflection

Derived terms

  • vejbump
  • bumpe

Verb

bump (form)

  1. imperative of bumpe

Welsh

Numeral

bump

  1. Soft mutation of pump (five).

Mutation


English

Etymology

From Middle English finden, from Old English findan, from Proto-West Germanic *finþan, from Proto-Germanic *finþaną (compare West Frisian fine, Low German finden, Dutch vinden, German finden, Danish finde, Norwegian Bokmål finne, Norwegian Nynorsk and Swedish finna), a secondary verb from Proto-Indo-European *pent- (to go, pass; path bridge), *póntoh₁s (compare English path, Old Irish étain (I find), áitt (place), Latin pōns (bridge), Ancient Greek πόντος (póntos, sea), Old Armenian հուն (hun, ford), Avestan ????????????????????(paṇtā̊), Sanskrit पथ (pathá, path)), Proto-Slavic *pǫtь.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fīnd, IPA(key): /faɪnd/
  • Rhymes: -aɪnd
  • Homophone: fined

Verb

find (third-person singular simple present finds, present participle finding, simple past found or (dialectal) fand, past participle found or (archaic) founden)

  1. (transitive) To encounter or discover by accident; to happen upon.
    • a. 1667, Abraham Cowley, The Request
      Among the Woods and Forests thou art found.
  2. (transitive) To encounter or discover something being searched for; to locate.
  3. (ditransitive) To discover by study or experiment direct to an object or end.
  4. (transitive) To gain, as the object of desire or effort.
  5. (transitive) To attain to; to arrive at; to acquire.
  6. (transitive) To point out.
  7. (ditransitive) To decide that, to discover that, to form the opinion that.
    • 1647, Abraham Cowley, The Request
      The torrid zone is now found habitable.
  8. (transitive) To arrive at, as a conclusion; to determine as true; to establish.
  9. (transitive, archaic) To supply; to furnish.
  10. (transitive, archaic) To provide for
    • 1871, Charles Kingsley, At Last: a Christmas in the West Indies
      Nothing a day and find yourself.
    • 1892, W. E. Swanton, Notes on New Zealand
      the pay is good, the musterer receiving ten shillings a day, and all found, all the time he is engaged on the “run,” even should he be compelled to remain idle on account of rain or mist.
  11. (intransitive, law) To determine or judge.
  12. (intransitive, hunting) To discover game.
    • 1945, Nancy Mitford, The Pursuit of Love, Penguin 2010, page 57:
      They found at once, and there was a short sharp run, during which Linda and Tony, both in a somewhat showing-off mood, rode side by side over the stone walls.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:deem

Antonyms

  • lose

Derived terms

  • befind
  • findable
  • finder
  • hard-to-find
  • viewfinder
  • unfindable

Related terms

See also finding and found

Translations

Noun

find (plural finds)

  1. Anything that is found (usually valuable), as objects on an archeological site or a person with talent.
  2. The act of finding.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Synonyms

  • (anything found): discovery, catch

Translations

Further reading

  • find in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • find in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • NFID

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fend/, [fenˀ]
  • Rhymes: -end

Verb

find

  1. imperative of finde

Middle English

Noun

find (plural findes)

  1. Alternative form of feend

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