bumpkin vs hick what difference

what is difference between bumpkin and hick

English

Etymology

From Dutch boomken (shrub, little tree), equivalent to boom +‎ -kin. Note that the English word boom is etymologically related to the aforementioned in the sense of “large stem”, or “big tree”. Compare German Baumke, Bäumchen.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʌmpkɪn/
  • Hyphenation: bump‧kin

Noun

bumpkin (plural bumpkins)

  1. A clumsy, unsophisticated person; a yokel.
  2. (nautical) A short boom or spar used to extend a sail or secure a stay.
  3. Dance, a series of reels, Scottish.
    • 1836, Joanna Baillie, The Phantom, Act 1.
      They mix with Dancers, who now advance to the front, where a bumpkin, or dance of many interwoven reels, is performed; after which the Bride is led to a seat, and some of her Maidens sit by her.

Derived terms

  • country bumpkin
  • joskin

Translations



English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɪk/
  • Homophone: hic
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Etymology 1

From Hick (pet form of Richard).

Noun

hick (plural hicks)

  1. (derogatory) An awkward, naive, clumsy and/or rude country person. [from early 18th c.]
Synonyms
  • boer, boor
  • country bumpkin
  • churl
  • hillbilly
  • lob
  • redneck
  • rustic
  • yokel
Translations

Etymology 2

Onomatopoeic.

Verb

hick (third-person singular simple present hicks, present participle hicking, simple past and past participle hicked)

  1. to hiccup
Translations

References

  • Webster’s Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

Luxembourgish

Verb

hick

  1. second-person singular imperative of hicken

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