bunch vs clump what difference

what is difference between bunch and clump

English

Etymology

From Middle English bunche, bonche (hump, swelling), of uncertain origin.

Perhaps a variant of *bunge (compare dialectal bung (heap, grape bunch)), from Proto-Germanic *bunkō, *bunkô, *bungǭ (heap, crowd), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰenǵʰ-, *bʰéng̑ʰus (thick, dense, fat). Cognates include Saterland Frisian Bunke (bone), West Frisian bonke (bone, lump, bump), Dutch bonk (lump, bone), Low German Bunk (bone), German Bunge (tuber), Danish bunke (heap, pile), Faroese bunki (heap, pile); Hittite [Term?] (/panku/, total, entire), Tocharian B pkante (volume, fatness), Lithuanian búožė (knob), Ancient Greek παχύς (pakhús, thick), Sanskrit बहु (bahú, thick; much)).

Alternatively, perhaps from a variant or diminutive of bump (compare hump/hunch, lump/lunch, etc.); or from dialectal Old French bonge (bundle) (compare French bongeau, bonjeau, bonjot), from West Flemish bondje, diminutive of West Flemish bond (bundle).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʌntʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌntʃ

Noun

bunch (plural bunches)

  1. A group of similar things, either growing together, or in a cluster or clump, usually fastened together.
  2. (cycling) The peloton; the main group of riders formed during a race.
  3. An informal body of friends.
    • “I don’t mean all of your friends—only a small proportion—which, however, connects your circle with that deadly, idle, brainless bunch—the insolent chatterers at the opera, the gorged dowagers, [], the jewelled animals whose moral code is the code of the barnyard—!”
  4. (US, informal) A considerable amount.
  5. (informal) An unmentioned amount; a number.
  6. (forestry) A group of logs tied together for skidding.
  7. (geology, mining) An unusual concentration of ore in a lode or a small, discontinuous occurrence or patch of ore in the wallrock.
    • 1874, David Page, Economic Geology: Or, Geology in Its Relations to the Arts and Manufactures
      The ore may be disseminated throughout the matrix in minute particles, as gold in quartz; in parallel threads, strings, and plates, as with copper; in irregular pockets or bunches
  8. (textiles) The reserve yarn on the filling bobbin to allow continuous weaving between the time of indication from the midget feeler until a new bobbin is put in the shuttle.
  9. An unfinished cigar, before the wrapper leaf is added.
  10. A protuberance; a hunch; a knob or lump; a hump.

Synonyms

  • (group of similar things): cluster, group
  • (informal body of friends): pack, group, gang, circle
  • (unusual concentration of ore): ore pocket, pocket, pocket of ore, kidney, nest, nest of ore, ore bunch, bunch of ore

Derived terms

  • buncha (bunch of)

Translations

Verb

bunch (third-person singular simple present bunches, present participle bunching, simple past and past participle bunched)

  1. (transitive) To gather into a bunch.
  2. (transitive) To gather fabric into folds.
  3. (intransitive) To form a bunch.
  4. (intransitive) To be gathered together in folds
  5. (intransitive) To protrude or swell
    • 1728, John Woodward, An Attempt towards a Natural History of the Fossils of England
      Bunching out into a large round knob at one end.

Synonyms

  • (form a bunch): cluster, group

Derived terms

  • bunch up

Translations



English

Etymology

From Middle English clompe, from Old English clymppe, a variant of clympre (a lump or mass of metal), from Proto-Germanic *klumpô (mass, lump, clump; clasp), from Proto-Indo-European *glembʰ- (lump, clamp).
Alternatively, possibly from Middle Dutch clompe or Middle Low German klumpe (compare German Klumpen). Cognates include Danish klump (probably from Low German as well). Compare Norwegian Bokmål klump.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /klʌmp/
  • Rhymes: -ʌmp

Noun

clump (plural clumps)

  1. A cluster or lump; an unshaped piece or mass.
  2. A thick group or bunch, especially of bushes or hair.
    • 1954, Lucian Hobart Ryland (translator), Adelaide of Brunswick (originally by Marquis de Sade)
      clump of trees
  3. A dull thud.
  4. The compressed clay of coal strata.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Brande & C to this entry?)
  5. A small group of trees or plants.
  6. (historical) A thick addition to the sole of a shoe.

Derived terms

  • clumpy

Translations

to be checked

Verb

clump (third-person singular simple present clumps, present participle clumping, simple past and past participle clumped)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To form clusters or lumps.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To gather in dense groups.
  3. (intransitive) To walk with heavy footfalls.
  4. (transitive, Britain, regional) To strike; to beat.
    • 1912, Mrs. Coulson Kernahan, The Go-Between (page 79)
      There is his poor little cap hanging up on the door; and there on the table is the knife he chipped a piece out of through not minding the mark on the knife machine, and I clumped his head for him, poor lamb!

Derived terms

  • clump up

Translations

References

Further reading

  • Clump in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

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