bunch vs lot what difference

what is difference between bunch and lot

English

Etymology

From Middle English bunche, bonche (hump, swelling), of uncertain origin.

Perhaps a variant of *bunge (compare dialectal bung (heap, grape bunch)), from Proto-Germanic *bunkō, *bunkô, *bungǭ (heap, crowd), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰenǵʰ-, *bʰéng̑ʰus (thick, dense, fat). Cognates include Saterland Frisian Bunke (bone), West Frisian bonke (bone, lump, bump), Dutch bonk (lump, bone), Low German Bunk (bone), German Bunge (tuber), Danish bunke (heap, pile), Faroese bunki (heap, pile); Hittite [Term?] (/panku/, total, entire), Tocharian B pkante (volume, fatness), Lithuanian búožė (knob), Ancient Greek παχύς (pakhús, thick), Sanskrit बहु (bahú, thick; much)).

Alternatively, perhaps from a variant or diminutive of bump (compare hump/hunch, lump/lunch, etc.); or from dialectal Old French bonge (bundle) (compare French bongeau, bonjeau, bonjot), from West Flemish bondje, diminutive of West Flemish bond (bundle).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʌntʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌntʃ

Noun

bunch (plural bunches)

  1. A group of similar things, either growing together, or in a cluster or clump, usually fastened together.
  2. (cycling) The peloton; the main group of riders formed during a race.
  3. An informal body of friends.
    • “I don’t mean all of your friends—only a small proportion—which, however, connects your circle with that deadly, idle, brainless bunch—the insolent chatterers at the opera, the gorged dowagers, [], the jewelled animals whose moral code is the code of the barnyard—!”
  4. (US, informal) A considerable amount.
  5. (informal) An unmentioned amount; a number.
  6. (forestry) A group of logs tied together for skidding.
  7. (geology, mining) An unusual concentration of ore in a lode or a small, discontinuous occurrence or patch of ore in the wallrock.
    • 1874, David Page, Economic Geology: Or, Geology in Its Relations to the Arts and Manufactures
      The ore may be disseminated throughout the matrix in minute particles, as gold in quartz; in parallel threads, strings, and plates, as with copper; in irregular pockets or bunches
  8. (textiles) The reserve yarn on the filling bobbin to allow continuous weaving between the time of indication from the midget feeler until a new bobbin is put in the shuttle.
  9. An unfinished cigar, before the wrapper leaf is added.
  10. A protuberance; a hunch; a knob or lump; a hump.

Synonyms

  • (group of similar things): cluster, group
  • (informal body of friends): pack, group, gang, circle
  • (unusual concentration of ore): ore pocket, pocket, pocket of ore, kidney, nest, nest of ore, ore bunch, bunch of ore

Derived terms

  • buncha (bunch of)

Translations

Verb

bunch (third-person singular simple present bunches, present participle bunching, simple past and past participle bunched)

  1. (transitive) To gather into a bunch.
  2. (transitive) To gather fabric into folds.
  3. (intransitive) To form a bunch.
  4. (intransitive) To be gathered together in folds
  5. (intransitive) To protrude or swell
    • 1728, John Woodward, An Attempt towards a Natural History of the Fossils of England
      Bunching out into a large round knob at one end.

Synonyms

  • (form a bunch): cluster, group

Derived terms

  • bunch up

Translations



English

Etymology

From Middle English lot, from Old English hlot (portion, choice, decision), from Proto-Germanic *hlutą. Cognate with North Frisian lod, Saterland Frisian Lot, West Frisian lot, Dutch lot, French lot, German Low German Lott, Middle High German luz. Doublet of lotto. Related also to German Los.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: lŏt, IPA(key): /lɒt/
  • (General American) enPR: lät, IPA(key): /lɑt/
  • (Boston, Western Pennsylvania) IPA(key): /lɔt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒt

Noun

lot (plural lots)

  1. A large quantity or number; a great deal.
    Synonyms: load, mass, pile
  2. A separate portion; a number of things taken collectively.
    Synonyms: batch, collection, group, set
  3. One or more items auctioned or sold as a unit, separate from other items.
  4. (informal) A number of people taken collectively.
    Synonyms: crowd, gang, group
  5. A distinct portion or plot of land, usually smaller than a field.
    Synonyms: allotment, parcel, plot
  6. That which happens without human design or forethought.
    Synonyms: chance, accident, destiny, fate, fortune
  7. Anything (as a die, pebble, ball, or slip of paper) used in determining a question by chance, or without human choice or will.
    • The lot is cast into the lap, but the whole disposing thereof is of the Lord.
  8. The part, or fate, that falls to one, as it were, by chance, or without his planning.
    • 1977, C-3PO in Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope.
      We seem to be made to suffer. It’s our lot in life.
  9. A prize in a lottery.
    Synonym: prize
  10. Allotment; lottery.
    • 1990: Donald Kagan, Pericles of Athens and the Birth of Democracy, chapter 2: “Politician”, page 40 (Guild Publishing; CN 2239)
      Archons served only for one year and, since 487/6, they were chosen by lot. Generals, on the other hand, were chosen by direct election and could be reelected without limit.
  11. (definite, the lot) All members of a set; everything.
  12. (historical) An old unit of weight used in many European countries from the Middle Ages, often defined as 1/30 or 1/32 of a (local) pound.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:lot

Derived terms

  • a lot

Translations

Verb

lot (third-person singular simple present lots, present participle lotting, simple past and past participle lotted)

  1. (transitive, dated) To allot; to sort; to apportion.
  2. (US, informal, dated) To count or reckon (on or upon).

Anagrams

  • LTO, OTL, tol, tol’

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *lā(i)ta, and adjective in *-to-, from Proto-Indo-European *lēy- (to pour).

Noun

lot m (indefinite plural lot, definite singular loti, definite plural lotët)

  1. tear (from the eye)
    Gjak, djersë dhe lotBlood, sweat and tears

Declension

Derived terms

  • losh
  • loc
  • loçkë
  • loke

References


Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch lot. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɔt/
  • Hyphenation: lot
  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Noun

lot n (plural loten, diminutive lootje n)

  1. destiny, fate, lot
  2. lottery ticket
  3. (archaic) lot, allotment (that which has been apportioned to a party)

Related terms

  • loten

Descendants

  • Negerhollands: loot, lot
  • Indonesian: lot
  • Papiamentu: lòt, lot

Anagrams

  • tol

French

Etymology

From Middle French lot, from Old French loz, los, from Frankish *lot, from Proto-Germanic *hlutą. Cognate with English lot.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lo/

Noun

lot m (plural lots)

  1. share (of inheritance)
  2. plot (of land)
  3. batch (of goods for sale)
  4. lot (at auction)
  5. prize (in lottery)
  6. lot, fate
  7. (slang) babe

Derived terms

  • gros lot
  • lot de consolation
  • sortir du lot

Further reading

  • “lot” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch lot, from Proto-Germanic *hlutą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlɔt]
  • Hyphenation: lot

Noun

lot (first-person possessive lotku, second-person possessive lotmu, third-person possessive lotnya)

  1. lot,
    1. (manufacturing) a separate portion; a number of things taken collectively.
    2. (colloquial) lottery
      Synonyms: lotre, undian
    3. (finance) allotment

Further reading

  • “lot” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Norman

Etymology

From Frankish *lot, from Proto-Germanic *hlutą.

Noun

lot m (plural lots)

  1. (Guernsey) lot (at auction)

Northern Kurdish

Noun

lot ?

  1. jump

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

lot

  1. simple past of la (Etymology 1)
  2. simple past of late

Polish

Etymology

Compare Czech let and Russian полёт (poljót).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɔt/

Noun

lot m inan

  1. flight

Declension

Synonyms

  • latanie, fruwanie

Related terms

  • (adjectives) lotniczy, lotny, nielotny
  • (adverbs) lotniczo, lotnie
  • (nouns) lotka, lotnictwo, lotniczka, lotnik, lotnisko, lotniskowiec, nalot, odlot, przylot, ulotka, wylot, latawiec, polatucha, podlotek, przelot
  • (verbs) latać, lecieć, odlatywać, odlecieć, podlatywać, podlecieć, polatać, polecieć, przylatywać, przylecieć, ulatywać, ulecieć, wylatać, wylecieć, wzlatywać, zlatywać, zlecieć

Further reading

  • lot in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • lot in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scottish Gaelic

Noun

lot m (gen lota, pl lotan)

  1. sore, wound
  2. sting

Tatar

Noun

lot

  1. A unit of weight: 1 lot = 3 mısqal = 12.797 g (archaic) [2]

Declension


West Frisian

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

lot n (plural lotten, diminutive lotsje)

  1. lottery ticket
  2. fate, destiny

Further reading

  • “lot (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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