bundle vs cluster what difference

what is difference between bundle and cluster

English

Etymology

From Middle English bundel, from Middle Dutch bondel or Old English byndele, byndelle (a binding; tying; fastening with bands); both from Proto-Germanic *bundil-, derivative of *bundą (bundle). Compare also English bindle.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʌnd(ə)l/
  • Hyphenation: bun‧dle
  • Rhymes: -ʌndəl

Noun

bundle (plural bundles)

  1. A group of objects held together by wrapping or tying.
    • 1760, Oliver Goldsmith, On National Concord
      The fable of the rods, which, when united in a bundle, no strength could bend.
  2. A package wrapped or tied up for carrying.
  3. A group of products or services sold together as a unit.
  4. (informal) A large amount, especially of money.
    Synonyms: (informal) mint, (slang) pile, (colloquial) small fortune
  5. (biology) A cluster of closely bound muscle or nerve fibres.
  6. (linguistics, education) A sequence of two or more words that occur in language with high frequency but are not idiomatic; a chunk, cluster, or lexical bundle.
  7. (computing, Mac OS X) A directory containing related resources such as source code; application bundle.
  8. A quantity of paper equal to two reams (1000 sheets).
  9. (law) A court bundle, the assemblage of documentation prepared for, and referred to during, a court case.
  10. (mathematics) Topological space composed of a base space and fibers projected to the base space.
    Meronym: stalk space

Hyponyms

  • (computing): native bundle

Coordinate terms

  • (quantity of paper): bale, quire, ream

Derived terms

Descendants

  • bindle

Translations

See also

  • Units of paper quantity on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References

  • bundle on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Verb

bundle (third-person singular simple present bundles, present participle bundling, simple past and past participle bundled)

  1. (transitive) To tie or wrap together into a bundle.
  2. (transitive) To hustle; to dispatch something or someone quickly.
    • 1835, Theodore Hook, Gilbert Gurney
      They unmercifully bundled me and my gallant second into our own hackney coach.
  3. (intransitive) To prepare for departure; to set off in a hurry or without ceremony; used with away, off, out.
  4. (transitive) To dress someone warmly.
  5. (intransitive) To dress warmly. Usually bundle up
  6. (computing) To sell hardware and software as a single product.
  7. (intransitive) To hurry.
  8. (slang) Synonym of dogpile: to form a pile of people upon a victim.
  9. (transitive) To hastily or clumsily push, put, carry or otherwise send something into a particular place.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 7
      Yes, there is death in this business of whaling—a speechlessly quick chaotic bundling of a man into Eternity.
  10. (dated, intransitive) To sleep on the same bed without undressing.
    • Van Corlear [] [stopped] occasionally in the villages to eat pumpkin pies, dance at country frolics, and bundle with the Yankee lasses.
    • 1991, Stephen King, Needful Things
      They were on the couch for nearly an hour, then in the shower for she didn’t know how long — until the hot water started to fail and drove them out, anyway. Then she took him into her bed, where she lay too exhausted and too content to do anything but bundle.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • bundle off
  • bundle up

Translations

Anagrams

  • unbled


English

Etymology

From Middle English cluster, from Old English cluster, clyster (cluster, bunch, branch), from Proto-Germanic *klus-, *klas- (to clump, lump together) + Proto-Germanic *-þrą (instrumental suffix), related to Low German Kluuster (cluster), dialectal Dutch klister (cluster), Swedish kluster (cluster), Icelandic klasi (cluster; bunch of grapes).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈklʌstə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈklʌstɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌstə(r)

Noun

cluster (plural clusters)

  1. A group or bunch of several discrete items that are close to each other.
    a cluster of islands
    • 1595, Edmund Spenser, Colin Clouts Come Home Againe
      Her deeds were like great clusters of ripe grapes, / Which load the bunches of the fruitful vine.
  2. A number of individuals grouped together or collected in one place; a crowd; a mob.
  3. (astronomy) A group of galaxies or stars that appear near each other.
  4. (linguistics, education) A sequence of two or more words that occur in language with high frequency but are not idiomatic; a chunk, bundle, or lexical bundle.
    examples of clusters would include “in accordance with”, “the results of” and “so far”
  5. (music) A secundal chord of three or more notes.
  6. (phonetics) A group of consonants.
  7. (computing) A group of computers that work together.
  8. (computing) A logical data storage unit containing one or more physical sectors (see block).
  9. (statistics, cluster analysis) A subset of a population whose members are sufficiently similar to each other and distinct from others as to be considered a distinct group; such a grouping in a set of observed data that is statistically significant.
  10. (military) A set of bombs or mines released as part of the same blast.
  11. (army) A small metal design that indicates that a medal has been awarded to the same person before.
  12. (slang, euphemistic) A clusterfuck.
  13. (chemistry) An ensemble of bound atoms or molecules, intermediate in size between a molecule and a bulk solid.

Derived terms

Descendants

Translations

Verb

cluster (third-person singular simple present clusters, present participle clustering, simple past and past participle clustered)

  1. (intransitive) To form a cluster or group.
    The children clustered around the puppy.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Oenone
      His sunny hair / Cluster’d about his temples, like a god’s.
    • the princes of the country [] clustering together
    • 1997, Lynn Keller, Forms of Expansion: Recent Long Poems by Women, University of Chicago Press, →ISBN, chapter 6, 281:
      On the page, “Me” is irregular but—except for a prominent drawing of a two-toned hieroglyphic eye—not radically unusual: the lines are consistently left-justified; their length varies from one to a dozen syllables; they cluster in stanzalike units anywhere from one to six lines long that are separated by consistent spaces.
  2. (transitive) To collect into clusters.
  3. (transitive) To cover with clusters.

Translations

Anagrams

  • culters, curlest, custrel, cutlers, relucts

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English cluster.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈklʏs.tər/
  • Hyphenation: clus‧ter
  • Rhymes: -ʏstər

Noun

cluster f or m or m (plural clusters, diminutive clustertje n)

  1. cluster
  2. (astronomy) star cluster
    Synonyms: sterrencluster, sterrenhoop, sterrenzwerm

Derived terms

  • sterrencluster

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English cluster.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /klœs.tœʁ/, /klys.tœʁ/

Noun

cluster m (plural clusters)

  1. cluster

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English cluster.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈklɐs.teʁ/

Noun

cluster m (plural clusters)

  1. (music) cluster (chord of three or more notes)
  2. (computing) cluster (group of computers working concurrently)

Spanish

Noun

cluster m (plural clusters or cluster)

  1. Alternative spelling of clúster

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