bundle vs pile what difference

what is difference between bundle and pile

English

Etymology

From Middle English bundel, from Middle Dutch bondel or Old English byndele, byndelle (a binding; tying; fastening with bands); both from Proto-Germanic *bundil-, derivative of *bundą (bundle). Compare also English bindle.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʌnd(ə)l/
  • Hyphenation: bun‧dle
  • Rhymes: -ʌndəl

Noun

bundle (plural bundles)

  1. A group of objects held together by wrapping or tying.
    • 1760, Oliver Goldsmith, On National Concord
      The fable of the rods, which, when united in a bundle, no strength could bend.
  2. A package wrapped or tied up for carrying.
  3. A group of products or services sold together as a unit.
  4. (informal) A large amount, especially of money.
    Synonyms: (informal) mint, (slang) pile, (colloquial) small fortune
  5. (biology) A cluster of closely bound muscle or nerve fibres.
  6. (linguistics, education) A sequence of two or more words that occur in language with high frequency but are not idiomatic; a chunk, cluster, or lexical bundle.
  7. (computing, Mac OS X) A directory containing related resources such as source code; application bundle.
  8. A quantity of paper equal to two reams (1000 sheets).
  9. (law) A court bundle, the assemblage of documentation prepared for, and referred to during, a court case.
  10. (mathematics) Topological space composed of a base space and fibers projected to the base space.
    Meronym: stalk space

Hyponyms

  • (computing): native bundle

Coordinate terms

  • (quantity of paper): bale, quire, ream

Derived terms

Descendants

  • bindle

Translations

See also

  • Units of paper quantity on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References

  • bundle on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Verb

bundle (third-person singular simple present bundles, present participle bundling, simple past and past participle bundled)

  1. (transitive) To tie or wrap together into a bundle.
  2. (transitive) To hustle; to dispatch something or someone quickly.
    • 1835, Theodore Hook, Gilbert Gurney
      They unmercifully bundled me and my gallant second into our own hackney coach.
  3. (intransitive) To prepare for departure; to set off in a hurry or without ceremony; used with away, off, out.
  4. (transitive) To dress someone warmly.
  5. (intransitive) To dress warmly. Usually bundle up
  6. (computing) To sell hardware and software as a single product.
  7. (intransitive) To hurry.
  8. (slang) Synonym of dogpile: to form a pile of people upon a victim.
  9. (transitive) To hastily or clumsily push, put, carry or otherwise send something into a particular place.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 7
      Yes, there is death in this business of whaling—a speechlessly quick chaotic bundling of a man into Eternity.
  10. (dated, intransitive) To sleep on the same bed without undressing.
    • Van Corlear [] [stopped] occasionally in the villages to eat pumpkin pies, dance at country frolics, and bundle with the Yankee lasses.
    • 1991, Stephen King, Needful Things
      They were on the couch for nearly an hour, then in the shower for she didn’t know how long — until the hot water started to fail and drove them out, anyway. Then she took him into her bed, where she lay too exhausted and too content to do anything but bundle.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • bundle off
  • bundle up

Translations

Anagrams

  • unbled


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /paɪl/
  • Rhymes: -aɪl

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Middle French pile, pille, from Latin pīla (pillar, pier).

Noun

pile (plural piles)

  1. A mass of things heaped together; a heap.
  2. (figuratively, informal) A group or list of related items up for consideration, especially in some kind of selection process.
  3. A mass formed in layers.
  4. A funeral pile; a pyre.
  5. (slang) A large amount of money.
    Synonyms: bundle, (both informal) mint, (colloquial) small fortune
  6. A large building, or mass of buildings.
    • 1817, Walter Scott, Rob Roy, II.2:
      The pile is of a gloomy and massive, rather than of an elegant, style of Gothic architecture []
    • 1697, John Dryden, The Aeneid
      The pile o’erlooked the town and drew the fight.
    • 1892, Thomas Hardy, The Well-Beloved
      It was dark when the four-wheeled cab wherein he had brought Avice from the station stood at the entrance to the pile of flats of which Pierston occupied one floor []
  7. A bundle of pieces of wrought iron to be worked over into bars or other shapes by rolling or hammering at a welding heat; a fagot.
  8. A vertical series of alternate disks of two dissimilar metals (especially copper and zinc), laid up with disks of cloth or paper moistened with acid water between them, for producing a current of electricity; a voltaic pile, or galvanic pile.
  9. (architecture, civil engineering) A beam, pole, or pillar, driven completely into the ground.
    Hyponyms: friction pile, bearing pile, end bearing pile
    Coordinate terms: pile driver, pile foundation
  10. An atomic pile; an early form of nuclear reactor.
  11. (obsolete) The reverse (or tails) of a coin.
  12. (figuratively) A list or league
    • Watch Harlequins train and you get some idea of why they are back on top of the pile going into Saturday’s rerun of last season’s grand final against Leicester.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:lot
Translations

Verb

pile (third-person singular simple present piles, present participle piling, simple past and past participle piled)

  1. (transitive, often used with the preposition “up”) To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate
  2. (transitive) To cover with heaps; or in great abundance; to fill or overfill; to load.
  3. (transitive) To add something to a great number.
  4. (transitive) (of vehicles) To create a hold-up.
  5. (transitive, military) To place (guns, muskets, etc.) together in threes so that they can stand upright, supporting each other.
Synonyms
  • (lay or throw into a pile): heap, pile up; see also Thesaurus:pile up
Translations

Related terms

Etymology 2

From Old English pīl, from Latin pīlum (heavy javelin). Cognate with Dutch pijl, German Pfeil. Doublet of pilum.

Noun

pile (plural piles)

  1. (obsolete) A dart; an arrow.
  2. The head of an arrow or spear.
  3. A large stake, or piece of pointed timber, steel etc., driven into the earth or sea-bed for the support of a building, a pier, or other superstructure, or to form a cofferdam, etc.
  4. (heraldry) One of the ordinaries or subordinaries having the form of a wedge, usually placed palewise, with the broadest end uppermost.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

pile (third-person singular simple present piles, present participle piling, simple past and past participle piled)

  1. (transitive) To drive piles into; to fill with piles; to strengthen with piles.
Translations

Etymology 3

Apparently from Late Latin pilus.

Noun

pile (plural piles)

  1. (usually in the plural) A hemorrhoid.
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English pile, partly from Anglo-Norman pil (a variant of peil, poil (hair)) and partly from its source, Latin pilus (hair). Doublet of pilus.

Noun

pile (countable and uncountable, plural piles)

  1. Hair, especially when very fine or short; the fine underfur of certain animals. (Formerly countable, now treated as a collective singular.)
  2. The raised hairs, loops or strands of a fabric; the nap of a cloth.
    • 1785, William Cowper, The Task
      Velvet soft, or plush with shaggy pile.
Translations

Verb

pile (third-person singular simple present piles, present participle piling, simple past and past participle piled)

  1. (transitive) To give a pile to; to make shaggy.

Anagrams

  • Lipe, Peil, Piel, plie, plié

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /piːlə/, [ˈpʰiːlə]

Noun

pile c

  1. indefinite plural of pil

French

Etymology

From Old French, from Latin pīla (through Italian pila for the “battery” sense). The “tail of a coin” sense is probably derived from previous senses, but it’s not known for sure.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pil/

Noun

pile f (plural piles)

  1. heap, stack
  2. pillar
  3. battery
  4. tails
  5. (heraldry) pile

Derived terms

  • pile ou face

Descendants

  • Haitian Creole: anpil
  • Khmer: ពិល (pɨl)
  • Malagasy: pila
  • Rade: pil
  • Turkish: pil
  • Vietnamese: pin

Adverb

pile

  1. (colloquial) just, exactly
  2. (colloquial) dead (of stopping etc.); on the dot, sharp (of time), smack

Derived terms

  • pile-poil

Further reading

  • “pile” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • plie, plié

Friulian

Etymology 1

From Latin pīla (mortar).

Noun

pile f (plural pilis)

  1. basin
  2. mortar (vessel used to grind things)

Synonyms

  • (basin): vâs
  • (mortar): mortâr

Etymology 2

From Latin pīla (pillar).

Noun

pile f (plural pilis)

  1. pile (architecture)

Italian

Etymology

Pseudo-anglicism, from English pile (textile).

Noun

pile m (invariable)

  1. polar fleece, fleece

Noun

pile f

  1. plural of pila

Anagrams

  • peli, plié

Latin

Noun

pile

  1. vocative singular of pilus

Latvian

Noun

pile f (5th declension)

  1. drip
  2. dribble (a small amount of a liquid)
  3. drop

Declension


Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpʲilɛ/, [ˈpʲilə]

Noun

pile

  1. inflection of piła:
    1. dative/locative singular
    2. nominative/accusative dual

Middle English

Noun

pile

  1. Alternative form of pilwe

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpʲi.lɛ/

Noun

pile f

  1. dative/locative singular of piła

Portuguese

Verb

pile

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of pilar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of pilar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of pilar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of pilar

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *pilę (chick); but also a *pisklę is reconstructed related to *piskati (to utter shrilly).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pîle/
  • Hyphenation: pi‧le

Noun

pȉle n (Cyrillic spelling пи̏ле)

  1. chick

Declension

See also

  • kokoš
  • pijevac / pevac
  • pileći gulaš

Verb

pile (Cyrillic spelling пиле)

  1. third-person plural present of piliti

Spanish

Verb

pile

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of pilar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of pilar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of pilar.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial