Bungalow vs Duplex what difference

what is difference between Bungalow and Duplex

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Hindi बंगला (baṅglā, Bengali), referring to the Bengali-style house. Compare Gujarati બંગલો (baṅglo) and Bengali বাংলা (baṅla). Doublet of bangalo.

Noun

bungalow (plural bungalows)

  1. A single-storey house, typically with rooms all on one level, or sometimes also with upper rooms set into the roof space.
    My aunt can’t manage the stairs any more, so she’s moving to a bungalow.
  2. A thatched or tiled one-story house in India surrounded by a wide verandah

Translations

References

  • “bungalow”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • “bungalow” in TheFreeDictionary.com, Huntingdon Valley, Pa.: Farlex, Inc., 2003–2021.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English bungalow, from Hindi बंगला (baṅglā).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʏŋ.ɡə.loː/, /ˈbʏŋ.ɡaː.loː/
  • Hyphenation: bun‧ga‧low

Noun

bungalow m (plural bungalows, diminutive bungalowtje n)

  1. A bungalow (small holiday home, usually single-storey).

Derived terms

  • bungalowpark

Finnish

Noun

bungalow

  1. bungalow (one-story house in India surrounded by a verandah)

Declension


French

Pronunciation

  • (France, Belgium, Switzerland) IPA(key): /bœ̃.ɡa.lo/
  • (Quebec) IPA(key): /bɔŋ.ɡa.lo/

Noun

bungalow m (plural bungalows)

  1. bungalow

Further reading

  • “bungalow” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Spanish

Alternative forms

  • bungaló

Etymology

From English bungalow.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bunɡaˈlo/, [bũŋ.ɡaˈlo]

Noun

bungalow m (plural bungalows)

  1. bungalow

Further reading

  • “bungalow” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin duplex (double, two-fold), from duo (two) + plico (fold together); compare πλέκω (plékō, twist, braid).

Pronunciation

  • (US) enPR: do͞o’plĕks, IPA(key): /ˈduplɛks/

Adjective

duplex (not comparable)

  1. Double, made up of two parts.
  2. (telecommunications) Bidirectional (in two directions).
    duplex telegraphy
  3. (soil science) Having horizons with contrasting textures.
    • 1977, Australian Journal of Botany (volume 25, page 462)
      Soils are duplex, sandy and solodic. The dominant trees are the stringybark eucalypts []

Antonyms

  • (bidirectional): simplex (unidirectional)

Hyponyms

(bidirectional):

  • full duplex
  • half-duplex
  • semiduplex

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Noun

duplex (plural duplexes)

  1. (US) A house made up of two dwelling units.
  2. (philately) A cancellation combining a numerical cancellation with a second mark showing time, date, and place of posting.
  3. (juggling) A throwing motion where two balls are thrown with one hand at the same time.
  4. (biochemistry) A double-stranded polynucleotide.
  5. (geology) A system of multiple thrust faults bounded above and below by a roof thrust and floor thrust.
    • 1993, David J. Lidke, Jack Burton Epstein, Chester A. Wallace, U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin (page 16)
      In contrast, the folds in the overlying lithotectonic unit 4 are larger and are cut by a series of faults in a duplex.
    • 1995, Robert D. Hatcher, Structural Geology: Principles, Concepts, and Problems (page 211)
      It has been noted, using a combination of surface geologic and seismic reflection data, that a duplex, although formed in response to movement of a thrust sheet, frequently arches the thrust sheet as the duplex is built by duplication of rocks beneath it []

Related terms

Translations

See also

Verb

duplex (third-person singular simple present duplexes, present participle duplexing, simple past and past participle duplexed)

  1. To make duplex.
  2. To make into a duplex.
  3. (juggling) To make a series of duplex throws.

Related terms


French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin duplex, see above.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dy.plɛks/

Noun

duplex m (plural duplex)

  1. a link between two points, such as a cable or a wire
  2. duplex, maisonette (dwelling)

Derived terms

  • duplexer

Further reading

  • “duplex” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin duplex.

Noun

duplex m (invariable)

  1. party line

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *dwipleks, formed from duo (two) and plec-, from the root of plicō (fold); cf. also plectō, plexum.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈdu.pleks/, [ˈd̪ʊpɫ̪ɛks̠] or IPA(key): /ˈdup.leks/, [ˈd̪ʊpɫ̪ɛks̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈdu.pleks/, [ˈd̪uːplɛks] or IPA(key): /ˈdup.leks/, [ˈd̪uplɛks]

Adjective

duplex (genitive duplicis, adverb dupliciter); third-declension one-termination adjective

  1. twofold, double
  2. bipartite, cloven
  3. ambiguous

Declension

Third-declension one-termination adjective.

  • Sg.Abl. sometimes duplice.

Descendants

  • English: duplex
  • French: duplex
  • Galician: dobre (possibly)
  • Italian: duplice, duplex
  • Spanish: doble (possibly), dúplex

References

  • duplex in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • duplex in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • duplex in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • duplex in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

Romanian

Etymology

From French duplex

Noun

duplex n (plural duplexuri)

  1. duplex

Declension


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