bunk vs bunkum what difference

what is difference between bunk and bunkum

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bŭngk, IPA(key): /bʌŋk/
  • Rhymes: -ʌŋk

Etymology 1

Sense of sleeping berth possibly from Scottish English bunker (seat, bench), origin is uncertain but possibly Scandinavian.
Confer Old Swedish bunke (boards used to protect the cargo of a ship).
See also boarding, flooring and confer bunch.

Noun

bunk (plural bunks)

  1. One of a series of berths or beds placed in tiers.
  2. (nautical) A built-in bed on board ship, often erected in tiers one above the other.
  3. (military) A cot.
  4. (US) A wooden case or box, which serves for a seat in the daytime and for a bed at night.
  5. (US, dialect) A piece of wood placed on a lumberman’s sled to sustain the end of heavy timbers.
Derived terms
  • bunk bed, bunkbed
  • bunkhouse
  • bunkmate
  • bunkspace
Translations

Verb

bunk (third-person singular simple present bunks, present participle bunking, simple past and past participle bunked)

  1. To occupy a bunk.
  2. To provide a bunk.

Derived terms

  • bunk up
Translations

Etymology 2

Shortened from bunkum, a variant of buncombe, from Buncombe County, North Carolina. See bunkum for more.

Noun

bunk (uncountable)

  1. (slang) Bunkum; senseless talk, nonsense.

Adjective

bunk (not comparable)

  1. (slang) defective, broken, not functioning properly
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:nonsense
Derived terms
  • debunk
Translations

Etymology 3

19th century, of uncertain origin; perhaps from previous “to occupy a bunk” meaning, with connotations of a hurried departure, as if on a ship.

Verb

bunk (third-person singular simple present bunks, present participle bunking, simple past and past participle bunked)

  1. (Britain) To fail to attend school or work without permission; to play truant (usually as in ‘to bunk off’).
  2. (dated) To expel from a school.
Translations

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “bunk”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  • Webster’s Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967
  • bunk in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • knub


English

Alternative forms

  • buncombe

Etymology

From buncombe, from “speaking to (or for) Buncombe County, North Carolina”, a county in North Carolina named for Edward Buncombe. In 1820, Felix Walker, who represented the county in the U.S. House of Representatives, rose to address the question of admitting Missouri as a free or slave state, his first attempt to speak on the subject after nearly a month of solid debate, right before the vote was to be called. To the exasperation of colleagues, he began a long and wearisome speech, explaining that he was speaking not to Congress but “to Buncombe.” He was ultimately shouted down by his colleagues, though his speech was published in a Washington paper and his persistence made “buncombe” (later respelled “bunkum”) a synonym for meaningless political claptrap and later for any kind of nonsense, at first only in the jargon of Washington and then in common usage (see discussion on talk page).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʌŋkəm/
  • Homophone: buncombe
  • Hyphenation: bunk‧um

Noun

bunkum (countable and uncountable, plural bunkums)

  1. (slang, countable) Senseless talk; nonsense; a piece of nonsense.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:nonsense
  2. (politics) Bombastic political posturing or oratorical display designed only for show or public applause. [1820s]

Derived terms

  • bunk
  • debunk
  • hokum

References


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